Team 75 My Tho

MACV Team 75 – My Tho.

This Page is intended for the discussion of the Military Assistance Command Vietnam Team 75 located in My Tho.

259 thoughts on “Team 75 My Tho

    • I was with 3-10 7th division in Ben Tre from Spring 67 through July 68. Do you have that list?
      Major Shipman, Captain Haywood, Lt Smith, etc.
      Thanks
      Chuck Cohen SGT

  1. i was at My Tho From Oct 1967 to Mar 1968. I worked as an intelligence analyst (96 B) I don’t really recall where I lived except it was a villa compound down the road from a Vietnamese Ranger unit and up the road from, I think, 7th ARVN Div HQ.

  2. My Father Dr Ralph G Leighty volunteered under the AMA program and worked in the orphanage I believe in 68 or 69

  3. I was a member of the team in 67-68 Does anyone know capt brandenburg with 12 Batalion 7th ARVN. I would like to reconnect with him and also Capt MacCarthy

    • I am the dumb squid that LTC Scholwalter left with the USAID Nurses at the Provincial Hospital. I am trying to find out what was happening around us that day. To be honest, by all rights none of us should have survived. Do you have any input on what was happening around the 7th ARVN HQ that first day?

      Jon

      • I remember a Captain McCarthy (MacCarthy?) who was part of Team 75 in 1967 or 1968. I think he was from Sioux Falls, South Dakota. I also remember a Captain Brandenburg, who I think was a former West Point football player (All American I seem to remember). I don’t know what happened to either of these two guys but this information may help in tracking them down.

  4. I was in MyTho for a month in 1963. USAF Advisor providing Weather Support at the Tan Hiep Airstrip. An Army Major gave me a ride to Tan Son Nhut so I could get paid. The sign above the gate to the compound read > Through these gates pass the best advisors in Vietnam. I am wondering if that is the same Major and if he would remember me. Thanks for your service ! Rich

  5. I was assigned to Kien Hoa in August 1962. When I got to Viet Nam there was one house in Ben Tre and not enough room for three of us who were going to Kien Hoa. We had to wait about two months in My Tho at the seminary before a contract was let for a second house. When my wife and I visited Ben Tre several years ago, we were not able to find our old house–it was on a side street not next to the Provence Chief’s House. We visited just after they had opened the bridge from My Tho to Ben Tre.

    I never heard back from Major Ames, but I hope he is well.

  6. I was at My Tho in mid 1968 as a civilian visiting my friend Sp/4 David G. Knowles MACV. My question is, I lost track of my friend Sp/4 Knowles. Can anyone tell me what became of him? Also, we got some Coors beer from the world, and several people took pictures of us drinking it. Anyone happen to have a picture of him and a civilian in mis- matched fatigues drinking a couple 16oz Coors beers?

  7. I just found a couple pictures of a Dust Off landing on the volley ball court to evacuate a WIA. As I recall, it was shortly after the Tet Offensive. If anyone wants them, let me know.

  8. I was at the compound in 1963 for a month as Weather Support at the Tan Hiep Airstrip. Do not remember what month it was but heard that the VC attacked the front gate area a couple of weeks after I left back to Tan Son Nhut & DaNang.

  9. I am the sailor from the River Group stationed in My Tho, and was stranded at the hospital with the USAID Nurses. There was a LTC Schowalter present for awhile.

    If interested in the full story, provide a means to contact you directly

  10. I am trying to locate anyone that was in My Tho for TET. Specifically anyone that remember the events at the Provincial Hospital, and the evacuation of President Thieu

      • For Bob Frank: I was left with the USAID Nurses at the Provincial Hospital by LTC Schowalter. I was told to keep them safe and he would send transports to evacuate them. That never happened.
        I kept them safe but to this day I need, really need to know what happened.
        they were five of most loving ladies it has been my privilege to have ever know. I took a bayonet defending them. All I want to know is what happened, and why no one seemed to care, no one.

      • Bob
        My name is Jon
        I was at the hospital with the Nurses from before supper until sometime the next afternoon. For awhile LTC Schowalter was there with us.
        I am trying to fill in the blanks on what was happening around us, can you help?

  11. Major (Lt Col) Ames,

    It is good to hear from you. I left the military in Feb 1964, got married and moved to Connecticut where our three kids were born. After 8 1/2 years of cold weather, I found a job with Arizona Public Service Co that was almost as exciting as work advising ARVN in Kien Hoa. A few years ago, my wife and I did a Cambodia/Vietnam river cruise with Elderhostel (now Road Scholar). We stopped for an evening at My Tho and the American who led the cruise for Elderhostel arranged for a taxi over the new bridge from My Tho to Ben Tre. No more ferries and a new road too. Ben Tre has changed greatly and we couldn’t find our Advisor Quarters when we got there. There were building all around the lake and the market was quite crowded. So my wife didn’t really get the feel of how it was in 1962 and 1963 when we were there. But we were happy we got there and she could see the town where I wrote many letters to her.

    Our three grown kids and five grandkids are all live within 30 minutes of where we live in Tempe.

    I always enjoyed you and respected your leadership and when I think of the people I worked for over the years, you are tops. I hope you are doing well. Thank you for putting a comment on this site.

    Carter Rogers

    • I was at the old MACV Team 93 later 88 area yesterday. In Saigon today. The only building from those days left is the old Province Chief Chief’s House/Hq. The MACV Team was right next door with both gates opening onto a road paralleling the Ben Tre River. Like most previous Province Hq, the current guys made it a museum. Down the road a piece is a pretty good size Hotel, the Vietnam-Australian Hotel. You can still see the province Hq on Google Earth and there are photos of the museum building. You must have gotten assigned to Ben Tre right after they established provincial teams.

  12. I was TDY at the 7th compound in MyTho for a month in 1963. I was providing Weather Support at the TanHiep Airstrip. I was the only AF guy in the compound. We were not allowed to head out to the strip until the sun came up and had to leave when the sun went down, because of VC in the area. Any one else stationed there during that time period. An Army Major took me up ShotGun Alley so that I could get paid at TanSon Nhut. One helluva ride that was !

  13. I was with the 4/11at the time of the fire at the Seminary and only remember the aftermath of the burned out area. John, my counterpart with the 11th Recon Co. was 1lLT Thuan. I would be very interested in any ARVN soldier’s you may find. I’m leading a tour to Vietnam with a small company named Dog Tag Tours. Thanks.

  14. I was in the Seminary during the Tet Offensive but I don’t recall anyone being killed as you have described. However, I do remember someone being wounded who was evacuated in the days following — sometime during February 1968. I remember a Dust Off landed on the basketball court to pick up the WIA. I vividly recall that the landing and the take-off were straight up and down so that the rotor would miss the surrounding obstacles. However, my understanding at the time was that it was not an American who had been wounded; rather, it was an ARVN or someone else who merited that kind of attention. I also remember the medical officer telling me that the WIA had been treated in the dispensary prior to evacuation and that he had lost his testicles.
    Also, I am going back to Viet Nam this Fall and am planning a side trip to My Tho on November 3. I am particularly interested in connecting with any former VC who were active in the Delta or ARVN officers from the 7th Division. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Specifically, I have been told that there is a former ARVN officer from the 7th Division (amazing that he is still alive) who is hosting tourists in the Ben Tre area. Does anyone know how to contact him?

    • I was an Intelligence analyst for Team 75, attached to the 7th ARVN Div and stationed at the Seminary. I was assigned to bunker B2 for guard duty assignments during night hours. Maybe the WIA you’re referring to was the American who was wounded in bunker B2 one night when a rocket landed in the bunker. The two soldiers in the bunker were wounded that night. One was walking around the next day with stiches in his head but the other was hurt badly enough to be evacuated. I never heard what had happened to him and have always wondered. I was in the bunker also that night, but I was assigned to the bottom (street level) and was unharmed. The two wounded were “upstairs”. I don’t remember the date, but I served there from Jul ’67 to Jul ’68. Despite Intelligence reports, we were not attacked during TET. What a relieve that was because we had reason to believe we were doomed.

    • Hi John,

      I was with River Division 533 and we were in My Tho during the ’68 Tet attack.

      There were no “in-town” Navy casualties, (PBR crew, SEALs or NSA personnel ) for actions “in-town” or the immediate surrounding area for that first week. I am unaware of any Navy casualties in J.C. Fisher’s unit though.

      On that particular morning, three fellow PBR sailors and I were patrolling town in a ‘borrowed’ Jeep and a pick-up and some time during that afternoon, we saw an Army Jeep at the soccer field. We pulled up to find out they were awaiting a Dustoff to evacuate an American soldier, but didn’t get the rest of the info as the situation was still pretty fluid.

      We hung around to see if our help was needed and in short time, we heard that familiar sound only a Huey has.

      As it was making its approach, the shutters in the announcer’s booth across the field flung open and not wanting to take any chances, we took the windows under fire.

      While that was happening, the Army NCOIC ran out onto the field to waive the off the Dustoff.

      We escorted the Jeep back to the docks and one of our boats took the WIA to Dong Tam.

      Ken Delfino United States Navy (Ret) RivDiv 533, TF-116 (10/66-7/68)

    • John, it’s been 49 years, but I do remember you. Did you ever make contact with any of our ARVN counterparts? Would enjoy hearing from you.

  15. I was a 1LT advisor and knew people who served at 7th Div HQ. It’s very likely that we met at the Seminary. I do remember the Yossarian jeep.

  16. You may remember the jeep that I rebuilt and had the name, Yossarian, painted on the windshield. When I rotated in January 1969, I left it behind. I’m going back this November to see if any of the whorehouses are still there.

  17. I served with 4/11, 32nd BDQ, and 11th Recon Co. during Sep 68 – Sep 69. Interested in sharing stories, photos, lies, etc. with others who were on Team 75 during that time. The name of Maj Marlow is familiar as we called him Major Major.

    • Jim
      I came after you at the end of November 1969 and was assigned to the 2/11 as the rebuilt and was later assigned to the division recon company. Did you meet your replacement in the 11th recon company and keep in touch with him? . I believe it was either Lt Welborn (Welbourn) or Lt Whitteker. I would like to contact either of them if anyone has any information. I am also looking for information on my RTO Sgt. Brewer, from Kentucky.

    • I servered in the comm. center inside the seminary at the 7th ARVN unit. 68-69
      Our XO was Lt. Haley dnk first name.
      Went tdy to dong tam got hit by shrapnal from a mortor.
      Haley wouldn’t approve my purple heart papers from the Mash unit.
      It sure has been.a long time…..

  18. Team 75
    LET US ALWAYS REMEMBER THE FALLEN
    in 2014, prior to my return visit to Vietnam, I spent two days at the national archives in Maryland searching for and reviewing operational records of my two units (2/11 and the Division Reconnaissance Company) for 1969 and 1970. Unfortunately, many of the records during 1970 were missing from the archives. The military assistants in the archives were extremely helpful, trying to locate records. One of the assistants provided a casualty list for team 75. I wanted to share the list so we could honor and remember their dedication, professionalism and sacrifice.

    Name RNK GR MOS D DATE
    MC PHERSON, WILLIAM RICHARD CPT 03 1542 3-Dec-65

    FRALEY, WILLIAM CLIFFORD SFC E7 11F40 6-Jul-66

    LEE, JOHN F 1LT 02 6-Jul-66

    LEONARDI, JERRY LEE SFC E7 11B4H 10-Jul-66

    ‘BROWN, SHERRILL VANCE CPT 03 82162 10-Jul-66

    MAHONEY, HARRY CURTIS JR MSG E8 11B4H 21-Jan-67

    PEEPLES, HARDY WINSTON CPT 03 81542 21-Jan-67

    TRIZZA, SAM RICHARD JR 1LT 02 81542 2-Jun-67

    BILLS, RUFUS WILSON SFC E7 11C4H 3-Aug-67

    VAN LONE, MURRAY WAYNE SR SSG E6 11E4H 20-Jan-68

    WILLIAMS, HOWARD SSG E6 11B4H 20-Feb-68

    POPE, ROBERT DALE 1LT 02 81542 26-Mar-68

    HOFFNER, WAYNE HENRY SFC E7 11B4H 26-Apr-68

    DAMMER, WILHELM KARL SSG E6 11 E40 5-May-68

    BELLAMY, ANTHONY RODNEY MAJ + 03 1204 5-May-68

    RICH, JOSEPH WALTER SSG E6 11C40 17-Jun-68

    JONES, CHARLES ALEXANDER SFC E7 11B4H 22-May-69

    CASTLEBERRY, JIMMIE LYNN SP4 E4 05B40 14-Oct-69

    KIRCHMAYER ANDREW GREGORY CPT 03 1542 18-Nov-69

    YOSHINO, KANJI SFC E7 11B4H 18-Nov-69

    GREEN, JOE WORTH MAJ + 03 G1542 1-Apr-70

    GUERRERO, FRANK ROBERT SP4 11B20 3-Jun-70

    • This is John Rowe. I served with SFC Chuck Jones in Ben Tre with the 10th Reg. He was the senior NCO advisor to the 1/10, and I was the battalion advisor to the 2/10. Chuck was a great guy, a great soldier, and a great American. His death was both a huge and sad loss to us with the 10 Reg. I think about him often.

    • The list isn’t complete. Cpt. Gary M. Clements was killed Aug. 6. 1969. He was my replacement when I went on R&R. When I returned, I recovered his body.

      • John
        First of all, I can’t imagine a worse set of circumstances as you returned from R&R . As I said, due to the volume of missing records,I do not have any confidence the list the National Archives provided was complete. I would like to ensure the list is as complete as possible to honor the fallen. I can reissue the list, adding Capt. Clements, citing your addition or letting your reply stand on it’s own. If we accept the latter, Capt. Clements might be lost because your reply is separated by several comments from the original post. What are your thoughts?

    • I recall three advisors all officers KIA during my tour in My Tho Last names Pease , Peoples and Pope. Peoples and Sgt Mahoney were in a Jeep which ran over a mine. I recall the small memory board listing KIA from Mo Cay- Kien Hoa prov in 1963. By the way I have complete list of all advisors assigned to Seminary date spring 1967 includes Air Force

  19. Disregard the above post at this time. I was preparing a list of the members of team 75 killed in action and this was inadvertently posted prematurely. Prior to my return to Vietnam I Spent two days Researching records at the national archives in Maryland. Unfortunately, many of the records during the 1970 era were missing.The research assistants were quite helpful and I was able to piece together some records. One of the assistance provided a list of team members killed in action. I wanted to share this list but was having formatting problems on the website and the above post was accidentally submitted. When I work out the formatting problems I will resubmit the list. I apologize for the potential confusion

    • From rkercull@gmail.com. I was at the seminary from Sept 66 thru late Aug 67. I recall several members KIA- officers Pease, Pope and Hardy Peeples. Sgt Mahoney was killed in jeep with Hardy Peeples when jeep ran over a mine. In 1963 two advisors were killed in subsector Mo Cay but I lost their names. Seminary attacked from the rear canal June 1966 and killed Fraley- I think the date 6 July 66 is wrong. I don’t remember Lt Sam Trizza KIA during my tour

    • There were two advisors killed in Mo Cay subsector either in 63 or 64. Between Sept 66 and Sept 67 officers KIA from AT 75 were Peeples, Pope and Pease. Sgt Mahoney was Killed with Peeples jan 67 when Jeep was blown while on road AM Jan 21st.Pope was assigned to subsector in Kien Hoa since I placed him a body bag. The year I was assigned to HQ in My Tho at the seminary we had other enlisted men killed but I never kept a log. There was a small plaque on the wall where the AOD sat that had all advisors listed who were KIA but I never took a [icture of it as it would be helpful

  20. For John Head—-when I moved to Morgan Hill CA i went next door to meet the neighbors. It was a Vietnamese Family. The wife was (is) a Pharmacist in Saratoga, CA. The husband—-Dr Vu or Vo was the Division Surgeon for 7th ARVN. They were very nice people but moved to Saratoga wihin a year of our arrival. I had flown in many times with the CG of IV Corps and the DSA between Jan-Jun 68 while assigned to Team 96. After that I spent a year based out of Cao Lanh with either Team 50 or 41st BDQ. Hard to imagine Dr. Vu is still alive. I am 68 and would guess he would be in his mid 80’s now.

  21. I am planning a trip to Viet Nam in November 2016, with a side trip to My Tho. Any suggestions? I am particularly interested in finding an English-speaking guide who is familiar with any surviving officers of the Seventh ARVN Division, members of the Viet Cong battalions we were operating against, as well as a arranging a visit to the Seminary.

    • I was assigned to Team 75 from November 1969 through November 1970. I spent my first 10 months in the field as an advisor first to the 2/11 and then the Division Recon Company. I spent my last two months running the PX at Dong Tam.

      My wife and I went back to Vietnam and Cambodia in March 2014 and I hired a guide through the Hotel in Saigon.Since we were married during my tour, it was interesting to see her visualize what she had only imagined before. I returned to My Tho and found it to be much more built-up than I remembered. The seminary is now a police station and Dong Tam is a Vietnamese military base however part of it has been converted to a snake farm opened to the public. Most of the wooden barracks had been torn down and replaced. I tried to get permission to enter both the seminary and Dong Tam but the police and military refused my request. My Tho still has some very good restaurants and the food was excellent.

      We looked for some of the Vietnamese I served with. Unfortunately, I was unable to locate any and hope you have better luck. I returned to some of the areas we operated in and was amazed how little had changed in some of the smaller villages in the rice patties and coconut groves. I brought back many memories, some good and some not so good.

      Overall it was a good trip the and I think I resolved some issues. My email is rlee343@comcast.net if you have any questions before you leave.

    • The seminary is new a police station and difficult to get inside. The location is easy to find as it sits on the north side of the old route 4. and is where the old dirt road forked off to the airfield. The fork in the road if you have and old map is approx 200 ft on the south side of the original hwy 4 from the seminary entrance. everything will look different after 50 yrs

  22. his wife’s sisters house was just south of the reservoir where he was staying. he arrived in My Tho on January 29 unannounced and with only his normal 6 man protective detail. I was at the hospital with the USAID Nurses when a CIA guy came by and went to 7th ARVN HQ, the next thing I knew the ARVN company assigned to the hospital was stripped and sent to the house. One sailor and five nurses left completely alone.

  23. Mike
    I was assigned to River Section 532. for TET I was the guy that stayed at the Provincial Hospital with the USAID nurses.

  24. I had a brother that was assigned to MACV Team 75. He was Captain Rubin Bradley. He was there Nov. 64 – Jun 65. He was KIA June 28, 1965. He was a Army Special Forces Advisor. I was wondering if anyone knew him or ever meet him.
    Thanks
    Neal Bradley

    • sir, my name is Jack Cook and I was assigned to Team 75, as a E-5 from Oct 64 until Oct 65 and I never knew or hear the name of
      CPT Bradley. I returned again in Aug 68 as a CPT with Special Forces at Can Tho, and operated in some of the same areas as my first tour……smiles….Cpt Cook

  25. Sam, Thanks for your note. Not many people on this site from the ’62 to’63 time frame. Air support for IV Corps during that time frame was provided by TDY fighter pilots who kept the L19 (I think that the designations of these Cessna airplanes while I was there) in Kien Hoa Province near Ben Tre. The pilots were TDY from Okinawa and were used to ferry the IV Corps General to various locations and/or to observe ground operations. During Ap Bac, General Vann made observations from the plane and tried to assist the troops on the ground via the advisors. The TDY Air Force pilots stayed with us in Ben Tre. I don’t remember their names. When the L19 was in Saigon for maintenance in the fall of 1963, the pilot went out on an operation with the ground troops and got shot. He was evacuated back to the States.

    • The pilot was Lt. Gray, he was on an operation with the ground units Captain J. L. Smith our S2 was with him at the time. Lt. Grey had an AR15 one of the early ones and was eager to use it in combat, and did. Gray was sent to Saigon, then to Clark Field, the last I heard from him, was a wedding invitation, one of the nurses who treated him at Clark. I am John Ames, I was senior advisor for Ben Tre, 1963-64

    • Michael. I think we met once or twice during our tour. I was with the 2/11 from November 28, 1969 (about a week after they were ambushed and suffered extensive casualties) until February 1970 when I took over as the senior advisor to the division recon company. My last two months in country, I ran the PX at dong Tam. I don’t think our time overlapped with the 2/11 but must have met at dong Tam. My RTO was a Sergeant Brewer from Kentucky. Do you remember him as I had been trying to locate him.

      bob

    • Tell your uncle Les Weisenhorn hello for me. I haven’t seen him for several years. The last time I saw him he was bitching about the birds eating up whatever he was growing out by Lamar. And I fondly remember him from reassembling the jeep that I had.

  26. I was CO of the 61st Medical Detachment (Preventive Medicine) at Dong Tam. Headed back to VN next month in an effort to locate Vietnamese friends after 48 years.

    • David.
      I was an adviser to the 2/11 and the division reconnaissance company from November 1969 Through 1970. My wife and I took a two week tour of Vietnam and Cambodia last year. The last five or six days was on a Viking River cruise from Phnom Penh to My Tho on the Mekong River. Following the tour I hired a private guide and returned to My Tho for two or three days to look for some of the Vietnamese I served with. Unfortunately I was unable to locate any and hope you have better luck.I returned to some of the areas we operate in and was amazed how little some of the smaller villages and rice patties had changed.

      There have been many changes as you can imagine. The seminary is now a police station and Dong Tam is a Vietnamese military base however part of it has been converted to a snake farm. Most of the wooden barracks had been torn down and replaced. I tried to get permission to enter both the seminary and Dong Tam but the police and military refused my request.

      This was a good trip the and I think I resolved some issues. I hope You have a good trip. My email is rlee343@comcast.net if you have any questions before you leave. I would also like to hear how your visit was when you return.
      Best Regards
      Bob

    • David

      My reply to your post got attached to Kurt Rindy’s note below. (Blame it on old age and operator error.) If you were at the seminary before dong Tam, I remember eating lunch with you one Monday after you completed the physical exams of the people the MPs brought in.

      Bob Lee

    • Morning, I am looking for anyone that was in My Tho around TET that remembers what happened at the Provincial Hospital and the Orphanage. I spent the night at the hospital with LTC Schowalter before he left to get back to the CP.

  27. This is John Rowe. I served with MACV Team 75 from August 1968 to August 1969. COL Hubert Tansey (West Point ’43) was the CO of Team 75 and the advisor to the Vietnamese general who commanded the 7th ARVN Division. I was a Captain then, and I was the battalion advisor to the Second Battalion of the 10 Regiment (2/10) that was operating out of Ben Tre when I came in-country. In addition to me, our 2/10 advisory team consisted of 1LT Robert Buck, SFC Carvelho, and SFC Bobby Garris. I replaced CPT Willard McLean. When I reported to the 10th Regiment, Major Bert Esworthy was the advisor to the Vietnamese commanding officer of the 10th Regiment, COL Kim. Major Jim Garvey (West Point Class of 1960) replaced MAJ Esworthy about the end of calendar year 1968. In 1968-69, the 10th Regiment had four battalions – two that operated out of Ben Tre and two that operated out of Ba Tri which was South of Ben Tre. COL Kim coordinated the combat operations of the two battalions that operated out of Ben Tre, and the Vietnamese Regimental XO, Major An, coordinated the combat operations of the two battalion that operated out of Ba Tri. In the late spring of 1969, I became the advisor to Major An. I have kept up with COL Kim through his son Long Pham who now lives in Georgia; COL Kim died earlier this summer (2015) in Vietnam. Jim Garvey died in 2002, and I think that Bobby Garris died in 2003. Does anyone know the whereabouts of LT Buck or SFC Carvelho? Thanks.

  28. Was TDY to MyTho/Tan Hiep for a month in “63” . The only thing at the Airstrip was a sign and a tent with sandbags around it. Was not allowed at the strip before sunrise or after sunset.

  29. Hi Michael Glatz here. While in RVN from 1970-1971, I served as an Advisor at the Basic Training School for RVN Soldiers and then later with the 1/11 7th ARVN. Would like to make contact with anyone that remembers me. Particulary interested in finding Sgt Vargas, Sgt Soto and or Capt Lee

  30. In seeing your comments on Sp/4 Frank Gurrero our mail man at that, I am wondering if anyone can remember me. I was one of the radio operator at 9th ID. My time with Ad Tm 75 was from Feb 70 to Jun 70, also 7th ARVN ID. If you can help, let me know. Thanks in advance.

  31. After spending 10 months in the field as an advisor, I was reassigned to the PX at Dong Tam. During September or October 1970 there was a MPC swap. The gates at Dong Tam were locked and all of team 75’s MPC was collected that night and given to me to take to Saigon. The next morning, my Sgt. and I drove to MACV Headquarters in Saigon with $300,000-$350,000 in MPC currency.
    Although we arrived early, there were several units ahead of us. It took hours for our bag of money to be counted, verified and the appropriate paperwork completed. The MPC had to be replaced with the exact number of each denomination turned in so it could be returned to the troops in the same denominations that were taken from them. At about 4:30 or 5:00 PM we received our money and told we needed to sign a receipt after we verified the count. After looking at our watch and anticipating the drive back to My Tho and Dong Tam on “Shotgun Alley” through Tan An we opted to sign the receipt, pray that it was right and try to get back before dark. Needless to say it was a very quick ride back. I don’t think either of us slept well that night. We were both relieved the next morning when we learned the count was right and everyone was reimbursed

    • Good to hear about someone else running down “Shotgun Alley” ! That damn Jeep wouldn’t go fast enough for me !

    • Im Rodney Jones. I was with 1/11th,7th Infantry Advisory team75 from 1969 thru 1970. I served as RTO/Light weapons advisor.Ive been looking for pictures from that tour. All my pics were stolen at out processing In the states. I don’t remember any names except a guy named Vargas. My Captain was on his second tour and was flown out in a straightjacket while we were back at Dong Tam. We very rarely got back to Dong Tam and usually stayed with our ARVN unit based between Dong Tam and My Tho.The who time there was like the wild wild west and extended my tour 3 months so I wouldn’t have to pull stateside duty, when I did this they put me in the PX at Dong Tam. I went weekly from Dong Tam to Saigon for the PX.

      • Rodney sorry to hear you lost your photographs. I have posted mine on Flickr were we at the PX to gather. After 10 months in the field I spent October and November 1970 at the PX at dong Tam. Were you the driver involved in an attempted hijacking by a Vietnamese gang in Saigon as the truck returned to dong Tam loaded with electronics cigarettes etc.?I think I have additional photographs of some of the Vietnamese employees at the PX. I will try to find them and send them to you. My email address is rlee343@comcast.net

        Bob Lee

  32. I wish I had a map that showed exactly where the Army Compound was and where the airstrip was in relation to it, as I don’t remember since it has been 50 some odd yeas ago!(TanHiep)
    I remember being sunning up on the roof behind a sandbag bunker. and later ,watching a VC flag go up across the canal before dark. We weren’t allowed out of the compound after sunset or before sunrise. Same with the airstrip. A Caribou had it’s landing gear blown off by a landmine earlier so when we got to the strip after sunrise we would run the perimeter of the landing area in a jeep looking for fresh dirt.
    Was the only AF guy at the time and did not get paid so the Army Major took me up to Ton Son Nhut to the AF Paymaster. Up Shotgun Alley, we were run off the road by 3 deuce & a halfs coming at us, supposedly ARVN but the center truck almost took us over a rice paddy dike.
    The VC had already infiltrated the SVN ranks. I still see the grin on his face as he whizzed by. Don’t remember the rest of the trip up or back ! Scary times !

  33. I was the District Senior Advisor in Cho Gao just east of My Tho and remember the June 9, 1966 attack on the Seminary as we monitored the Team 75 radio at night in case they sent us late operation requirements for the next day. It was quite a hulabaloo over the radio but we mustered the entire district compound to the walls in case we were a secondary target–all was quiet through the night. My jeep was blown off the road the next day by a sapper team but no Americans were in it–my driver was uninjured along with a couple of PFs. That same day, Captain Ted Cuzick from the 7th ARVN Advisory Team came out to pay us and tend to our medical ills (mainly crotch rot from the paddy ops) and told us of the attack–mainly recoilless rifle and mortar fire as I recall his words. I think a special forces sergeant was killed standing on a small balcony going out to observe the attack–mortar hit the small roof above him–guess he was just visiting from one of the camps–probably My Dien camp northwest in Long Dinh District–bad luck. This might have been in another incident rather than that night. Any body recall any casualties that night. I had many good contacts with Col. Sid Berry thereafter–he helped me to get into grad school for the Foreign Area Officer program. He died from severe Parkinson’s Disease–a good officer and commander. +RIP+

    • I wasn’t at the Seminary during that attack, but I remember those that were saying that someone died crossing the basketball court. Those walls were a patched up mess when I arrived in Mar 67 and stayed till May 69. I was mail clerk the first year and clerked the mess assoc the second. Was the only guy left on the mortar team after everyone rotated for home just as TET started. Got to shoot HE anywhere I wanted every hour all night long for a while.

      • Hello Craig, my name is Joe Abarno.I was stationed at the Seminary, My Tho in 68/69. During that time the building was attacked and our bunk arears were destroyed by fire. For some time we had no uniforms and when we got replacements we had no patches which got us in trouble when we went into town. Drove on Shotgun alley many times to go to and from Dong Tam for tdy.
        I was in the signal corp and reported to a Lt. Healy (first name unrecalled).
        I , just wanted to say hello. If you have time drop me an email at: area51jma@aol.com
        It would be nice to hear from someone else that was there.
        Joe

  34. I was stationed at the Seminary in My Tho from Jan 66 thru Feb 67. I was an enlisted man working for Col Sidney B Berry Jr and later Col John E Lance Jr. Does anyone remember the attack on the Seminary on June 9, 1966? Couldn’t find my pants in the dark. Myself and a security guard who arrived that morning defended the bunker on the far north end. Col Lance informed me that I was out of uniform because I was wearing jockey shorts instead of Army issue boxers. He was dressed the same way.

    • I was stationed in My Tho from January ’66 to October ’66. I remember well the attack on June 9th. I was with the 581st signal group there. I was an unassigned guy that went to the mess hall on the alerts at the time. Usually there were about 15 to 20 of us in there but that night there were only two of us. The guy came next to me when he came in and a minute or two later the back wall was hit and came in on us. An officer came in to see who was there. We were alright, just covered with debris and scared. He needed someone for the bunker on the ARVN barn side. The other guy had his weapon but no ammo. I gave him a clip but he had a white t-shirt on and I was dressed fully so I was the one sent to the bunker. A week or so later I was assigned to the concrete bunker near the RTT hut and responsible for the BAR. I’ll never forget that night as they walked the mortars all around the building and set up inside the Vietnamese Rangers billet next to us. They were also in the “White Mice” hut across the highway in front. We had the two mortar pits in the back but never got a chance to fire a round. 57 recoil-less hit us from across the river in back. Went as security to the helipad down the road to evacuate the wounded.

  35. I was assigned to Team 75 from November 1969 through November 1970 and was initially assigned as an adviser to the 2/11 as they were rebuilding and retraining following a disastrous engagement during early November in 1969 (just prior to my arrival) I was later reassigned as an adviser to the Division Reconnaissance Company. I have been trying to locate my RTO ,SGT. Brewer. He was an E-4 at the Seminary and the 1st SGT. Convinced he to extend for 6 months so he could get an early out when he went home and would not have to serve out the remainder of his enlistment. He was also promoted to E-5. He was then told there were no E-5 slots at the Seminary and was reassigned to the Division Recon Company as my RTO. It has been too many years and I cannot recall his first mane but I would like to contact him if anyone has any information about him. He was from Kentucky.

  36. There were two Lt. Popes at Team 75 and I knew both. But, I don’t remember first names so I am not sure which one you are asking about. One incident I remember is that one Lt. Pope was killed. The other one was scheduled for R&R. But, the Army, true to form, got the two mixed up and cancelled the scheduled R&R for the one Lt. Pope who was very much alive. This was straight out of Catch 22 where one of Yossarian’s fellow crew members was mistakenly listed by the Army as KIA. So, when he was eligible to rotate back to the States, the Army wouldn’t let him because, as everyone knows, dead people aren’t eligible for rotation.

  37. I am trying to find information on First Lieutenant Robert Dale Pope. He was with team 75 from Aug 1967- March 1968. Does anyone have any stories, pictures, information, etc?
    Thanks

  38. This is for anyone that was in My Tho during TET.
    I am trying to find our how and where President Thieu was evacuated back to Saigon. I know he was flown out, but who flew him out (Army/Navy/Air Force/ARVN) and where in the city was the LZ.

    • Flew out in a Huey ,the LZ was the soccer field there in town. Richard Pitman and myself had security at the wall facing the hospital.Anyone remember Capt. Larry Cole from Texas? He was wounded and flew out to Japan.

    • Hi Jon:
      I was with RivDiv 533 from 9/66-7/68 and was in My Tho that week. It wasn’t until about six years later when I read a book titled Tet by Don Oberdorfer that I found out that Thieu was in My Tho with his daughter! I checked with some of my 533 buddies and officers and none of them knew!
      As I recall, the LZ was just west of town, but during that week, the soccer field in town was used for medevacs.
      In 2008 I started an e-mail to my 533 buddies as memories came back to me and it ended up being at 4-5 page document! If you’d like, I’ll send you a copy.
      Ken

  39. I had a brother that was in the ADV TEAM 75. His tour stated on 11/28/1964 and KIA 6/29/1965. He was Capt. Rubin F. Bradley. I am curious if any one served with him or remembers him. my email is: ncbradley@bellsouth.net If you would like to contact me. Thanks
    Neal Bradley
    Jackson, Al

  40. Good Compound was named for Cpt. Kenneth N. Good. Whom was KIA on 2 January 1963 in Dinh Tuong Province. He was a senior advisor with 2nd Bn,11th Regt….. 7th Div. He was a silver star and purple heart recipient.

  41. I left Vietnam in August 1963 and I don’t know about any place named for Capt. Good. I had known Capt. Good slightly, but not very well. I knew Lt. Streeter well since we were in the MATA 4 class (Advisor Training) together at Ft. Bragg and at Monterey. At the time of Ap Bac, I had relocated to Ben Tre but still maintained contact with the people at the Seminary.

  42. The battle of Ap Bac, where Captain Good died is discussed at length in a book titled “A Bright Shining Lie.” The book is available from Amazon. The book is mostly about Col John Paul Vann who was the head of Team 75 at the time, i.e., 1963. Capt. Good was killed at Ap Bac and Lt. Streeter was injured. Both are discussed in the book.

    • Sheehan’s book has a discussion about the Battle of Ap Bac. If you go there today there is a large metal billboard along Highway 4 depicting the battle. Another less known book you will find interesting is the late David Halberstam’s fictional book “A Very Hot Day” which portrays the situation in My Tho and Dinh Tuong Province and the Battle of Ap Bac using fictionalized place names and pseudonyms for US advisors (and author’s license too). The book is available on Amazon.com.
      John Haseman

    • read it years ago, i’ll dig it up. do we know this is the same cpt good(e) for whom the dong tam compound is named after?

    • I was not in My Tho during TET but I did fly over it in a Huey which got shot up pretty bad. We were pretty luck as we were able to make it to Dong Tam which was a few miles from My Tho. Our chopper took over 40 hits. The left door gunner was the only one hit, I can still see the tracers flying by me inside the chopper. I still can’t believe I survived that deal. Our chopper had all the fuel cells hit. Very lucky we were able to land.

      • Were you one of the two Huey gunships that dove on the bus station? I’ll never forget that. All the mini guns were pouring led down and when the bus station fired back, it looked like more red was going up than down. I think all of our hearts stopped as we watched from the Seminary down the road. It seemed like two weeks went by before we heard they made it back.

    • Went for a couple of rides with you guys. Was stationed at the seminary,but we moved to a private residence in town. We were out on patrol in My Tho when Tet started and wound up holding up at the advisor compound in town. Was a hell of a couple of days.

      • I was duty driver for the Seminary the night of TET. The pass truck was so overloaded it felt like the Queen Mary as she rolled back and forth on it’s overloaded springs. I still remember guys on the roof looking in the windshield. What a night.

  43. anything you can find re cpt goode and the compound itself would be useful. I’m compiling a database of locales in se asia and an acquaintance has published a book on persons for whom installations were named. cpt. goode belongs In there I would think. thanks very much.

  44. I’am trying to fine anyone who remember me. I was assigned MACV Team 75 at the Seminary at My Tho in Jan 1970 to about June 15, 1970. In about May that year I was sent to 9th ID HQ as a RTO. I was also with a CTP Kitchens. At this time I was a SP4. At this time the VA and the Army can not fine any records of me. Assistance is needed if possible.

    • do you have any information on the Goode compound? I can’t find anything about it. particularly location and for whom named. thanks.

      • I may have some trivia in old records.The compound was named for Cpt. Goode.It was in the shadows of the old 9th Div. and on the opposite side of the facility from the Navy Team.

  45. I found some old letters last night of my uncle’s and it had team 75 in the address. Does anyone know Sgt. Hugh Willard? I don’t think he was with this team very long when he got orders to team 91.

  46. I was DSA in Cho Gao District in 1966 as a Team 75 member when Col. Sid Berry was 7th ARVN Senior Advisor. LTC. Louis Martin was my boss as PSA, Dinh Tuong. I came back after TET ’68 (June ’68 to June ’69) as DSA Long Dinh District (later renamed Sam Giang District) just west of Dong Tam Base. I’m writing a book of those two years with help from Cpt. Enrique Pujals, 1st Lt. Jim Jeter, Sp. 4 Dick Bond, Cpt. Lynne Michael Patten, SSG. Hollis Hibbitts, and Major Jim Gilbertson. Anybody remember any of us–would like to hear from you. Team 75 was changed to Team 66 sometime after 1966 for the Province advisors in Dinh Tuong.

  47. I was a member of Team 75 from August 1964 until August 1965 and when not on operations we stayed in Ben Tre near the helicopter pad on the north side of town,,,,,,

    It was an eye opener when I retuned for my second tour in 1968-1969 near Can Toe with Special Forces. I look on my life in Viet Nam as one of the greatest things that ever happen to me…….it was a different war the second time around,,,,hell they even had tanks when I came back,,,,,,CPT JACKIE COOK 9916 BUFFALO LAKE LANE, AUSTIN, TX 78747

  48. Chuck:

    I’ve been trying to find you. Yes, I remember. And I have photos of our trip out on the river to what I referred to as VC Island. I recently tracked down one of the two–she is married to a doctor. She was visiting a daughter who was living in Denver last summer when we met over a beer.

    I located Peter Wetherell who lives in Woodstock, Connecticut. But I have yet to find Michael Hanks–remember him?

    Here is my contact information:

    John F. Head, Esq.
    Head & Associates, P.C.
    4155 East Jewell Avenue, Suite 500
    Denver, CO 80222
    Voice: 303-623-6000
    Mobile: 303-748-0274
    Fax: 303-623-4211

    Send me your contact information.

    Best regards and Happy New Year.

    • Don’t recall Hanks, getting old. Would love to contact Pete Wetherell. I will call you. I have some pictures from VC Island with you and Sandy, the other doughnut doll. I think she was from Oklahoma. I have pictures of the Coconut Priest on that Island. I will call you tomorrow. My contact is Merrill Lynch, 150 Fayetteville Street, Suite 2000, Raleigh, NC 27601, 919-829-2012.

  49. I would like to ask a question for those that will admit that they were in My Tho on 30/31 Jan1968.

    Why were the USAID nurses left alone living and working at the provincial hospital?
    When we came through on the morning of 31 January there was just a single soldier, wounded with them. not a soul for team 66 or 75.
    try to explain that one

  50. I would like to add an unsolicited comment and recommendation about Richard’s earlier book, Prodigals: A Vietnam Story. The book was based on his two tours, the first of which was an assignment to team 75. Richard was an adviser from August 67 — Aug 68 with the 2/11 ARVN Battalion. I followed Richard to Team 75 from November 1969 through November 1970 and was initially assigned as an adviser to the 2/11 as they were rebuilding and retraining following a disastrous engagement during early November in 1969 (just prior to my arrival) I was later reassigned as an adviser to the Division Reconnaissance Company.

    I would describe the book was a soldier’s story written by a soldier who had been there. I found that we shared many of the same thoughts and feelings just as we shared the same AO and assignment on Team 75. Richard describes the 7th Division’s area of operations and notable landmarks in some detail as he recalls his operations. I was able to remember and picture many of the locations he described because I walked through them also. I returned to Vietnam earlier this year after 45 years and wish I had found Richard’s book prior to the trip.

    I think you will find the book a good read that will bring back memories of your tour.

    Bob Lee

  51. My latest book, Almost Eden, is set in the Vietnam Delta, and is now available on Amazon.

    Almost Eden is a love story wrapped in a war. Izzy, the guerrilla girl born of a jungle war in Luzon during World War II, defies her parents’ wishes and flies to Vietnam as a Red Cross volunteer. Along the way she meets Abe, a soldier, and falls in love. Their devotion is tested by the most difficult of life’s challenges but they find inspiration from the family’s patron spirit of enduring affection.
    Almost Eden (Vietnam) traces the family saga begun in Eden Lost (Philippine-American War) and continued in Return to Eden (World War II).
    Taylor, influenced by the war in Vietnam, is stirred to share deeply inspiring accounts in fiction, many derived from experience and his seminal work Prodigals: A Vietnam Story.

  52. I was with the1st Sig Brig. assigned to the Seminary in June 69. I’m looking for any photos taken by Gi’s of the exterior or interior of the Seminary (any year). I have seen the flickr photos and they knock me down! It was just the way I remembered it. Anyone with photos can contact me at davidlutton@hotmail.com
    Welcome home ya’ll.

    • I am currently visiting My Tho with my wife. I was stationed at the Seminary from January-August 1970 with the Team75 MP Detachment from the 188th MP Company. Photos I took of the Seminary are on the Classmates.com website under Camden High School, San Jose, Calif., Class of 1964 under my name, under “photos” labeled ‘My Tho’,
      Robert E. Conner, CPT, MPC

      • I was with the adv.tm 75 attached to the 188th Mp co. In dong tam from mid 69 to mid NOV. 1969. There were 6 of us from the 300th Mp. Co. 92 Battalion. Yours is the 1st mention of this unit I have seen. Trying to get more info.

        • If you would could you visit the provincial hospital across the blvd from the old 7th Arvn hq and take a few pic’s.

          I am the dumb squid that defended the USAID Nurses at the opening of TET and just wondering how the place looks now

          Jon

          Sent from Mail for Windows 10

    • Did they rebuild the signal barracks after the fire there? I must have been pretty short when that happened. Rounds were popping off as I had to go by it to get the money out of the mess assoc safe in case it went up too.

  53. Master Sergeant, aloha
    I was with the 3-10-7 in Ben Tre from July 67 through July 68 and Major Shipman, Captain Haywood and a Lt. Smith were my bosses. Do you recall a Tom Canada, Walter Roedel, Bill Vines or a Macey?
    That was a very long time ago. Thanks for your reply

    • Tommy Canada worked with me. I was an assistant Battalion Advisor under Captain Fred Groat. Chuck Re Corr ist lt then.

    • My dad was there Jan. 67 DEROS Jun 67 am confused how he was placed there. Went over to Vietnam June 66 with 173rd Airborne. SGM Ronald Veasey WAS HIS name.

  54. I was assigned to Advisory Team 75 from November 1965 to January 1968.I served with the 11th Regiment of the Vietnam 7th Infantry Division as a Infantry weapons advisor. I am Master Sergeant George W. Alton. Would like to hear from any one who was there during that time.

    • Hello George
      First you are going to have to forgive me, I am a sailor. I was attached to a river patrol section in My Tho, PBR’s.
      I am also trying to find folk that were in the city during the first three or four days of TET. First off to thank them, secondly help in gathering some information.

      Jon

    • Master Sergeant, I was stationed in Ben Tre with the 3-10 7th ARVN Division from Mar 67 through July 68. Major Shipman was the senior advisor for the 10th regiment and Captain Haywood was my 6 for the 3rd battalion.

      • I was the Intel Sgt on Team 93 in Ben Tre 66-67 leaving August. I carried a radio a couple of times on ops with the 10th Regt when 41st Ranger Bn or 856 RF Company were part of it. I believe you called yourselves Delta Mud something or other.

    • The only one I remember was LTC Schowalter, he was with me the first night of TET at the hospital for a short period of time that night. I am well aware of what happened to him the next day, I was there.

    • Msgt. Alton I am Capt. Chester Stengrim’s oldest son and have been looking for info of an incident for 30 Sept 65 in Dinh Tuong Province. Do any of these names ring a bell. Capt. Jimmy Williams, Lt.’s Stevens and Baldwin. Sgt.’s Horton and Berry? Other than a citation for MG.(Capt) Robert F. Mollinelli I can find no after action reports for this incident. Any help from those who served with the 7th ARVN advisors from 65-66 would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all for your service.

    • I was assigned to the seminary Aug 66 thru aug 67. Have pictures which I can place on a CD and mail them. By the way my secondary email address is advisoryteam75@gmail.com. For years I have used all the various sector subsector names for my emails not to mention vinhlong1966, thanhphu1966, and myphouctay,etc. The one that always wakes people up is victorcharlie2@gmail.com. I think my old address apbac1966 is obsolete but the others I still occasionally use

  55. I was an Air Force advisor with Team 75 at My Tho from Aug 64-Oct 64. Maj Austin (same name) Capt Redmon, A2C Seal, Daily runs between Tan Hiep in order to get combat pay. Excursions to the field other times. Ran daily radio checks between the TOC and Saigon. I was a radio operator.

    • Was at TanHiep in 1963 and provided Weather Support at the airstrip for a month. I was AF also. Stayed at the Army Compound with the saying over the entrance gate > “Thru these gates pass the best damn Advisers in Vietnam” ! A Major gave me a ride up to Ton son Nhut to get paid. It was a ride up “Shotgun Alley” ! Pedal to the metal in his Jeep with a BAR between my legs and his .45 strapped to his side. Went into MyTho a few times ! Meat/fish market was interesting!

      • Oh Ya, such memories. I recall driving like hell down the main road from Saigon to My Tho with my M16 on the dashboard and my new guy(s) huddling in the pickup, scared as hell and looking to me for some courage. I kept a straight face but underneath I was also a little concerned. Those were the days of the “Wild West”. I bought a Walther P-38 pistol from a cab driver in Saigon for $60. I loved that pistol and bought another one a few years ago and paid $600 for it. Cocked hats, cocky guys, most of us proud to be there.

  56. I was stationed with the 3-7-10 out of Ben Tre during 67-68; I’m planning a trip there late September. Has anyone been there lately?

    Thanks

    • Chuck, I was on Adv Tm 88 from June 1971 through Feb 73, DDSA in Ham Long, DDSA in Mo Cay, DSA in Ham Long during the ’72 offensive. I’ve been back several times since 1996, most recently in 2012. You will find My Tho and Kien Hoa (now it’s Ben Tre Province) it hugely changed — bridge from My Tho, bridge from main island to Mo Cay. Ben Tre thriving and much bigger, Mo Cay ditto, smaller villages doing well. You will have difficulty finding Adv Tm houses in Ben Tre and districts — the former Province compound is about to be a high rise (maybe already is) and the district team houses were all destroyed after 1975. No hassle, easy to arrange car/driver/guide in Saigon. Have a great trip. John Haseman

  57. Pody — can you put MACV 127-R is in context and tell us how the term was used? I looked up team 127 to see there was a post using that term but no one has posted to that site.

    • All I know it is some type of personal action form. you know the pile of paper that is needed by someone we don’t know for reasons we don’t know to collect data no one needs

    • Pody

      Good luck with trying to find out about MACV 127-R.

      On Friday, August 22, 2014 I sent the following message to the National Personnel Record Center:
      I am trying to determine if MACV 127-R is a form related to the Military Assistance Command Vietnam and what information is contained on the form. I have searched DOD websites and Department of the Army websites and did not find any reference to it. Your assistance in this matter would be greatly appreciated.
      ==========================================================
      On August 25 I received the following response from the National Personnel Record Center:

      Thank you for contacting the National Personnel Records Center. The Privacy Act requires a written release authorization before we can provide copies of the requested document(s). We need complete information to identify and locate the service record: complete name of veteran, branch and approximate dates of service, social security number and service number if one was issued, date and place of birth. We need a signature from the veteran, if deceased, next of kin, date, and include your mailing address. Requester must provide proof of death, such as a copy of a death certificate, letter from funeral home or obituary.
      The following is considered as Next of Kin: un-remarried spouse, father, mother, brother, sister, son and daughter. Individuals not listed may request information releasable under the Freedom Of Information Act. *** For security purposes, we will not accept request via email ***

      You may also submit a Standard Form 180 for this request. You can also download a copy of the Standard Form 180 from our web site, http://www.nara.gov/regional/mprsf180.html.
      =============================================================

      Makes you realize how little things have changed!

      • Actually this does not make any sense. from what I remember (senior moments allowed) this was a fill in the blanks form…..daaaa
        it is not important, i just ran across it referenced and could not figue out what it was for. For all I know it was to report a case of the clap.

      • Pody
        I agree the response made no sense at all, did not address the question I asked and provided a lot of nonsense by quoting a government regulation that had nothing to do with the question. Just thought you would be interested in the reply

  58. Jon
    I have uploaded my 1969 photographs that include a basketball game at the orphanage to the following link:
    if you copy and paste the link in your browser it should take you to the photographs in Flickr. The pictures of the orphanage are approximately three quarters through the photographs. The last photographs are the photographs I took in My Tho several months ago.
    Unfortunately most of my photographs are in the field or Dong Tam where we spent most of our time. I hope these help.

    Bob

  59. yes, and I think I remember the short blonde from the USO show from the MRF.
    I am going to need some time to go over them in detail, and again thank you

  60. does anyone know or remember what USAID facilities were in My Tho just befoe TET? i am doing so reseaarch and can’t find any information about USAID in the city at that time.

  61. Chuck,

    I have some pictures taken in Ben Tre on Feb 5, 2009. The bridge from My Tho to Ben Tre Province had just opened and my wife and I were on a Cambodia to Vietnam river cruise through Elderhostel (now Roads Scholar). We tried to find the house where our advisory team officers stayed, but ran out of time before we could find it. Ben Tre has grown very much since 1962/63 when I was there. My Ben Tre pictures start with the road over the new bridge and ending with a visit to the tourist office in Ben Tre. We had breakfast at a Pho restaurant in Ben Tre. We found the lake which now has buildings all around it. The market has grown greatly.

    I apparently can’t download pictures on this site and I don’t subscribe to any social media. However, let me know if you are interested, give me any suggestions you have as to how to send them and I will figure out a way.

  62. what i would really like to know does anyone have any good pictures for My Tho from 1967 1968 especially the area around the church/school/orphanage and the main hospital

    • Joh
      I have a few pictures at the orphanage from 69 and 70 at a basketball game with the students. I will try to upload them tomorrow. I recently had most of my slides transferred to a DVD and spent a couple of hours today trying to sort them out. If I get them loaded tomorrow I will send you a link.

  63. Don’t feel alone. I spoke with some folk that were there with me in 68 and went back last year. the cops had a fit when they tried to take pictures of the old Victory hotel and Carter Billet.

  64. Bob Lee

    I too visited My Tho in March’14. My wife and I hired a car with an English speaking guide and drove down to My Tho from Saigon. I flat refuse to use Saigon’s new name. To me, Saigon will always be Saigon. At any rate when we finally located the Seminary which now is in the city limits, we presented ourselves at the front gate seeking permission to enter the compound which is now a police station. The guard seemed willing to let us in but quickly changed his mind when a female police officer obviously with rank presented herself and made it quite clear that we were not welcome nor was my camera. You know, a cop is a cop and I learned a long time ago not to argue with them and promptly retreated back to our car and de-de-mahed (sp.) the hell out of there. Maybe next trip, if I’m so lucky, I can get some decent pictures.

  65. Amazing! I wouldn’t have found The Seminary without direction. I do recognize the tower in the background in 2 of the pictures taken from inside the walls. While there, I always wondered why the VC never tried to blow it down.

  66. I just returned to Vietnam after 45 years. My wife and I booked a two week tour with Viking River cruise. I was assigned to the division recon company, team 75, from 1969 through November 1970.

    It took a little time to find the seminary because it had changed so much. Once we saw the roof of the two-story building protruding above the concrete wall there was no doubt we had found it. The area around the seminary is completely built up now with shops. There is a three or four story department store adjacent to the outer wall. There has been a lot of development and change in My Tho however when we went out to the countryside to the rice patties, coconut groves and small settlements, life seemed to be much as it was 45 years ago. Most of the houses in the rice patties still had the thatched or tin roof but they now had a satellite TV antenna. I found the people to be curious and friendly and seemed to have moved past the war much quicker than we did.

    The Vietnamese have built a four lane interstate type Highway between Saigon in My Tho. The highway bypasses Tan An and other villages along the way The drive was about 45 minutes as compared to, as I remember, more than an hour and a half.

    I have posted recent photographs of the seminary and My Tho at:

  67. Just stumbled on this site. I was on Team 75 from Aug 67 — Aug 68. With the 2/11 ARVN battalion at Binh Duc Training Center until sometime after Tet and was then in G3 and lived in the Seminary. My book “Prodigals: A Vietnam Story” recounts that period as well as my second year with the 1st Cavalry. There is mention of the Seminary on the night of Tet and also some information on USAID nurses. Don’t know if it is the ones someone was looking for information on. We were having dinner at their quarters on the night of one mortar attack. My book is available from Casemate or Amazon for anyone interested. It was a featured selection of the Military Book Club a number of years ago.

    Nice to find people trying to connect from Team 75 and the Seminary.

    Richard Taylor (Lt and Capt then.)

    • Richard
      I am the one looking for the nurses. I was with them on the first night of TET into the following morning. It is important to me to know how they made out. please contact me.

      • Jon, I honestly don’t know how they made out during or after Tet. My battalion was heavily engaged during and for months after Tet. I seem to believe they were okay but do not have evidence to support that. Sorry.

    • Richard
      I know they made it out of country, I was hoping to find out how they fared, after TET. I was reassigned out of My Tho and when I got back they were gone.

    • Richard

      Just read the excerpt from your book on Amazon. You got me with the teaser so I ordered it. Unfortunately, I don’t think my flight to Vietnam was as eventful the flight attendants were nice, but none of them held my hand..

    • Hi Richard: We overlapped by three months in Dinh Tuong when I became DSA in Long Dinh District in June 1968. Just finished your book which is well done. Read of your forays into Nhi Binh Village (the double Y area as you call it). I was in there often in 1966 and 68-69 as I was also Cho Gao District DSA in 1966. Just finished my book of the two years as a memoir of those two years, my early years as a kid, and the aftermath. Retired in 1983 as an 0-5 aster turning down Defense Attache’ position in Seoul. Wrote the book for my family and the men I served with in both tours I could find–they helped me write it and added many comments on my leadership–enlightening to say the least–but humorous too.

      • I was the District Senior Advisor in Cho Gao District (then an 0-3) in 1966 (Team 75 then) with Col. Sid Berry as 7th ARVN Senior Advisor, and then District Senior Advisor in Long Dinh District (Vinh Kim located there and later named Sam Giang District) June 1968 to June 1969. A number of my brave E.M. and young officers from both My Tho tours assisted me in writing a memoir of those two years for my family and their progeny. It contrasts Dinh Tuong Province (My Tho area) before Tet ’68 and after, speaks of some of the real Army/ Navy heroes we knew, acknowledges the many competent RF/PF leaders we served in combat with, lays out the many successes and troubles we had coordinating the activities of the U.S. Ninth Infantry Division Units and other allied forces in the Rocket Belt surrounding Dong Tam Base and our heavily populated villages like Vinh Kim. None of us thought it would become a popular narrative with its many reflections on personal family life, the foibles of a small, mixed-rank team sharing close quarters in a tense war situation, and the narration of our activities vis-a’-vis the strategic war in Saigon and Washington. We are surprised to see that the book, “You Ain’t Nothing But A SWAMP RAT” is now the Book of the Month and best-seller at the Airborne and Special Operations Museum near Ft. Bragg, N.C. All proceeds go to the museum which really needs the income as government funding of the museum is facing cuts. All of us need to write down our memories about the advisor role and the fine men who manned these teams or it will be lost to history and nothing but the scant “official archives” will be left. SWAMP RAT is a long read of 680 pages and fifty photos–you do not need to overdue it with yours. This MACV Teams website is terrific as a start!

  68. I was with the 3/10 7th ARVN about 5 clicks outside of Ben Tre when Tet started; they fought their way back and re-secured the town…never more proud of a group of guys

    • Glad I found this group. Was just goggling on the Seminary and it popped up. What are you writing about?

      • well after 30 years of haze grey and underway, I figured I had a few sea stories. actually, it is a novel about a “could happen”
        this is not the right forum for details.
        if you want email me at pody [at} roadrunner.com

  69. Bob Hamilton While at Seminary was informed Sec.Of Def. McNamara was to visit. Was instructed by Maj. McBride to set up panels at Soccer Field (Airport). Knew nothing of signal panels and no texts avail. to explain symbols. Grabbed 1/2 dozen panels and laid out on soccer field. One of the 3 choppers landed and Sec. Of Def. emerged and proceeded to Seminary. Upon his return to Soccer field a Full Col. accompanying him stopped and thanked me for great welcome. Have since laughed my a off. Luckily I got by on that one.

  70. With Team 75 early 65 for 2 months. Advisor 7th ARVN Div. Ordnance Co. Sgt. Bradish was on Team also. Reported to Major McBride. Seminary had hot boxes to store gear owing to high humidity. Reassigned II CALC, Qui Nhon. 9th ARVN w/Advisors transfered to MyTho from Qui Nhon. II CALC in need of someone to run 2 Bars. Capt. Jackson; Advisor, gave approval for me; one who had never been either side of a bar. Team 27 had great food.

  71. I arrived in the delta early September 1962 as an artillery advisor for Kien Hoa province (Ben Tre province). Since there were not enough quarters in Ben Tre, I was located at the seminary in My Tho (Team 75) for about two months until an additional house was rented in Ben Tre (Team 43–looks like the team number changed after I left in 1963). Col John Paul Vann led the advisory team at My Tho at that time. Major Scoles was at Ben Tre and he was followed by Major John Ames. ARVN had two 105 howitzers at Mo Cay and two at Giong Trom and a platoon of 4 deuce mortars, initially near Ba Tri then moved north and east of Ben Tre. After about 6 months the army changed my MOS to infantry advisor and I then worked as an assistant with the province Civil Guard and Self Defense Corps. On operations I would usually go with the artillery forward observer. I have completely lost touch with the advisory team members at My Tho and at Ben Tre. I did visit there briefly while on an Elderhostel tour about 4 years ago and everything had changed. I did find the lake in Ben Tre, the market was quite different, and I could not find the houses used by our advisory team. Time flys.

  72. I was with the 3rd Battalion, 10 Regiment 7th ARVN in Ben Tre from May 67 – June 68. Major Shipman, Captain Haywood, LT Avery Smith, Tom Canada, Walt Roedel, Bill Vines were all there. Walt and Bill died from cancers……so it goes

    • Chuck Cohen: I don’t know you—but I was also and advisor to the 3rd Bn 10th ARVN Regiment in My Tho and Ben Tre from Nov ’65 to Mar ’66. After that I worked in the 7th ARVN Div TOC in My Tho. Do you know of anyone else who was in Adv, Team 75 during 1965 or 1966? Jim Nelander

  73. Yes, I was part of the advisory team assigned to the G-2 section — I was the order of battle advisor. The fact of the matter is that the ARVN officers I was advising had forgotten more than I knew. I joined Team 75 on August 20, 1967 as a 2nd Lieutenant with a Order of Battle MOS and left as a 1st Lieutenant on January 16, 1969. I was discharged in Oakland on January 20, 1969.

    I remember Marlow — he hated me and the feeling was mutual. He gave fat-assed majors a bad name. It is no surprise that he wanted Yossarian taken off the jeep as he resembled one or more of the characters in Catch 22 and it no doubt that jeep pissed him off every time he saw it.

    The jeep in question was written off (I think the Army term is “journaled”) as it had been through a number of mortar attacks and was riddled with holes. Various types of people had stripped the jeep of virtually everything — battery, U-joints, seats, etc — and there was nothing left to it except the body, the motor, the transmission and the axles (sans U-joints). The compound commander — a captain whose name I cannot recall — told me in the Officers’ Club that he was going to journal the jeep. I asked for it and he gave it to me on the condition that I get it off the Seminary premises.

    At about the same time, the ARVN company commander of the 7th Division ordnance company told me that the jeep could be towed to over to his shop, as he would be happy to help me rebuild it. So I did.

    Contemporaneous with this, I had heard about an Army graveyard in Long Binh which stored military equipment that had been journaled. I borrowed the Team 75’s duece and a half to go see. Les Weisenhorn (then a Spec 4, later a U.S. Marshall in Denver) went with me. Among the equipment there were jeeps stacked up like cordwood. As I recall, there were three trips with the duece and a half to find parts from that stack of jeeps. It seems to me that you were part of at least one of those trips.

    The jeep was then rebuilt using the parts so obtained. After it was put back into operating condition, it looked absolutely awful. But, it ran.

    One day, I was driving around just west of the helipad in My Tho and came across a US unit plopped down in the middle of nowhere. I stopped to find out what they were all about. It was a Army reserve unit from San Antonio that had been activated. They were dumped there with no mission, no knowledge of fire support, no nothing. They didn’t even have concertina around the perimeter (they weren’t even sure where the perimeter was), no bunkers, no knowledge of radio frequencies to call for help and no knowledge of how or where to find supplies. So, I helped them by scrounging up sand bags, helping them lay out defensive positions, where to call for close air support, med evac,, etc. I even showed them where to find the PX and where to find the whorehouses downtown.

    Sometime after I helped them to get organized and find needed supplies, the company commander inquired about the jeep that was so rusty and full of shrapnel holes. I gave him the story. He said that he was so appreciative that he would like to see what he could do as he had a number of body and fender guys from San Antonio. Some time later, the jeep had been restored. After the body work was done, it had been repainted with Army green and the name “Yossarian” stenciled on the windshield. It looked like a new jeep.

    In January 1969, I was so happy to get out of Viet Nam, get out of the Army and get away from Marlow that leaving the jeep behind was not something I gave a second thought. But, now, I wish I had it.

    • I had a buddy named sandy Bradbury who was in the S-2 section of the team. I think he left in August 1967 so maybe you missed him. I was in Saigon with another of Sandy’s buddies named Bob Vickers. One weekend Bob drove down on a motorcycle to see sandy – they crapped out when Bob pulled up at the gate on a motorcycle. Next day they put together a small convoy to escort bob back to Saigon.

    • John, Chuck ReCorr here. Do you remember taking the two Doughnut dollies (red cross girls) from Don Tam to the Coconut Island?

    • Wasn’t Maj Devlan in G-2 then? He was my mortar officer before he went to Can Tho. Always did like that man, he really made us an efficient team.

  74. Does anyone know what happened to my jeep that I rebuilt? It had Yossarian painted below the windshield. I wish I had taken it with me when I rotated in January 1969.

    • No…but there were a few times I used that jeep for transport to the 7th ARVN TOC.
      I don’t think many people understood the the significance of the name Yossarian. There was a Major Marlow though who actually ordered me to have the name Yossarian removed…never happened of course.

      You were the first lieutenant attached to the G2 team correct?

  75. I was assigned to Team 75 Sep 62 to Nov 62 when I was able to get lodgings in Ben Tre, Advisory Team 93. I was an Artillery 1st Lt, and worked for Capts. Williamson and Ryder.The head of Advisory Team 75 at that time was Lt. Col. John Paul Vann. I have pictures of Advisory Team 93 personnel circa 1963.

    • I was at TanHiep Army compound and provided Weather Support at the Tan Hiep airstrip for a month in 1963.Not sure of exact date but all there was at the strip was a tent surrounded by sandbags ! An Army Major took me up to Ton Son Nhut in a wild Jeep ride to get paid as I was USAF.(TDY) I also remember a sandbag bunker on top of the two story barracks. The sign at the entrance to the compound read “Thru these gates pass the best damn advisers in Vietnam” !

  76. Scott Greene

    I was with Advisory Team 75 from July 67 to 68. I was there during the Tet Offensive. While on a cruise in March 2014, my wife and I hired a car and driver to take us from Saigon down to My Tho and was amazed with all of the changes to include a four lane super highway for most of the trip. Had a devil of a time finding the Seminary. It was out of town in 67/68. Now the Seminary has been swallowed up by the city and is now a police station. It has changed a lot but still the same in many respects. I have to admit that I am not totally sure that what I thought was our Seminary may not have been, but I am about 90% sure.

    • I would love to see some before and after pic’s. the Armor House, Seminary, victory hotel, hospital, etc. any chance you have a few?

      • If you open “Google Driving Directions” and zero in on My Tho, you can trace Highway 4 that went N/W from My Tho to Saigon. Look @ where the canal comes in close to the road (Hwy 4) then look for where a stream joins the canal @ a bridge. Just beyond that about 300′-400′ is The Seminary on the right @ the canal. From overhead (no street view available) you can look @ the building configurations and everything fits. I am 99.9% sure. I hope you can make sense of this because I think it will really flip you out like it did me.

        Good Luck-Mike

  77. My father was on MACV Team 75 at My Tho 67-68. Bob Suckfiel is his name
    I recall some his stories. As a kid one of our favorite stories was about a monkey named Charlie and Capt on a bunker lobbing grenades into the jungle after being mortared. Thank you all for service and welcome home!

  78. I was with the Signal Detachment May 68 thru Feb 69. We lost SP4 Hounshel in Nov 68 when he was taking repair parts to the 7th ARVN TOC. SFC Montgomery was our NCOIC.

  79. Yea, they blew it up the night before I was to leave but I didn’t hear a thing. Of course the Seagrams and Coke could have had a lot to do with it.

    • I remember being told about the bridge, I was a guest at the 17th Evac Hosp in Saigon, waiting my turn for the big bird to Evens AF Hospital in Colorado Springs.
      Thats what happens when you don’t have enough 7&7.

  80. I had just recently got back from leave to the Seminary when they blew that bridge in the morning. Slept through the whole thing. I remember our Cuban/American Capt. Perez being very upset with me still in my bunk. They blew that bridge right out of its foundation. Had been over it many times. Sorry I cant help you with the nurses, though I met one with the medics at the seminary once. Tm 75 Mar 67 thru May 69. Was mail clerk the first year and mess assoc bookkeeper the second.

  81. The VC blew that bridge the night before I was supposed to convoy to Saigon (Aug of 68) and process out. Luckily, a Warrant Officer gave me a ride in a 2 seater (Loch I think) so I made it.

  82. SP4 David Westfall Team 75 G2 Analyst
    10/1968 – 12-1969

    Spent many a day/night at the 7th ARVN TOC

    Claude Vigil, Les Wiesenhorn, Tom Drabick, William Cole, Any One else still around ?

    • David:

      I went back to Denver. Contact info follows:

      John F. Head, No. 3077
      6333 South Poplar Court
      Centennial, Colorado 80111
      Telephone: 303-748-0274
      email: jfhhead@headlawyers.com

      One of the Donut Dollies who was stationed at Dong Tam — Pat Owen — just contacted me. She was in Denver last weekend and we had a beer.

      All the best.

      • John
        do you think that she may remember the American nurses (USAID) that were at the civilian hospital in My tho during TET?

    • Hi Dan! My name is Kristin. My uncle is Les Weisenhorn. If you want his contact info, please email me at KHowe9312@yahoo.com. I’ll pass along. He’d love to hear from you!I told him about this post and he was quite surprised!

  83. Thank you for the reply. Did you ever get a chance to visit the USAID nurses quarters at the civilian hospital? there were four of them a tall blonde (curly hair), a tall brunett (short straight hair), and two shorter brunett.s. there was also a Nun that lived there.
    That is where I met LTC Schowalter.

    • Mike, I just saw this post by you. Hope you’ll see this and reply. I’m Curt Rindy. You and I worked in G2 as Intelligence Analysts. I think of you from time to time and wonder what you’re up to. You sang some damn good harmony too!

      • Hey Curt:
        I’m stunned! I just got home from shopping (I’m retired) and thought of the ole Seminary, you and Sgt Funk so I started surfing and bang!
        This hit me in the face. Man, it’s great to hear from you. We’re going to have to hook up on the net. Are you on Facebook?

        • What do ya know, you saw my post! No, I’m not on facebook. I’m not a big fan of technology, still have my flip phone! Lol. Email me some time at curtrenegade@verizon.net or call at 850-443-5442. Good to hear from you! Glad I discovered that MACV Team 75 site on line. Kind of fun to read some of that stuff about the Seminary and MyTho.

  84. Was LTC Schowalter the PSA? Also were you in the city during the opening hours of TET? I am trying to find someone that remembers the events at the civilian hospital and if possible the american nurses there.

    • Mike
      do you remember what happen to the team that got ambushed just north of the hospital. I know a recon team from the 148MP got involved
      also Do you remember a LTC schowalter?

      Jon

  85. Looking for anyone that was in My Tho during the Tet Offensive.
    Specifically anyone with information concerning what happened at the Provincal Hospital.
    Also, trying to locate the USAID nurses that were there.

    • Mr. Seebode we’re you there during the ambush incident on 29/30 Sept 65. My Father was Capt Chester Stengrim. Robert F. Molinelli was the rescue helo I’m looking for the rest of the story.

  86. Lee Ahnlund from 15 nov 1969 to 9 jul 1970 Deputy Kenneth R E Senior William B D What Happen to Sp/4 Frank Guerrero the mail man? and my friend James M Ruzzo.

    • I remember Frank. I was assigned to Team 75 beginning in November, 1969. As I recall, they were returning from taking some women who worked at the Seminary home and lost their lives at a bridge from a vc attack. Frank was a good friend of Specialist Mizell, who was one of our Birddog crew chiefs. I was Swampfox17. I must have started at Team 75 about the same time as Cpt. Andy Kirchmayer, a field advisor with the team. He lost his life on a mission which I was covering from above but called away from on about Nov.19, 1969. I remember sitting in the bar the night before that with Andy. Gosh, it must have been one of his first missions, and it certainly would’ve been one of mine–Lots of memories.

  87. Sp/4 Lee Ahnlund was a member of the military assistance command,during the period 15 nov-9 jul 70. Army’s 7 infantry division of the Tien Giang Tactical zone with senior advisor Kenneth R and William B Tien-Giang zone

    • My name is John Rosmus and I was assigned to Team 75 from Sep 69 to /jul 70. I first worked at the seminary with CPT Tom Price, LT Dallas Viall, SSG Pedro Castro, SP4 Tom Zvonik and PFC Harold West. Also with Doc Edwards. From March70 to Jul70 I was an RTO with 2/12 Bn where MAJ Drisko was CO. Do any of these names ring a bell with anyone. I remember being on the radio the night SFC Yoshino was killed.

      • John
        Welcome home brother. I remember several of the names you mentioned. Him I served with team 75 from November 1969 through November 1970 about a week after SFC Kanji Yoshino, And Capt. Andrew Gregory Kirchmayer were killed. I replaced them for a couple of months on the 2/11th while they rebuilt until a more senior officer arrived. Capt. Patterson had one of the battalion advisor for one of the battalions in the 11th. Time has erased the names of the other Battalion advisors. Major Shipman was the Senior advisor. I was then transferred to the Division Recon company as the senior advisor. My RTO was Sgt. Brewer. William (Bill) Wellborn advised the 11th Recon, Jerry Whitten had the 12th and I believe a Lieut. Alan Klofkorn had the 10th for a brief time. I have recently spoken with Bill Wilburn who retired as a Lieut. Col. in the Army National Guard and Jerry Whitten who both seem to be doing well. I have tried to locate my RTO, Sgt. Brewer but have been unsuccessful. All I can remember was he was an 18 or 19-year-old kid from Kentucky. By any chance, do you remember him, know his first name or have any contact information for him.

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