Team 47 An Loc

MACV Team 47 – An Loc.

This Page is intended for the discussion of the Military Assistance Command Vietnam Team 47 located in An Loc.

143 thoughts on “Team 47 An Loc

  1. For everyone who has posted here at Team 47 I find it very intriguing for me to read the posts of the guy’s before and after my time in An Loc and the guy’s who were with me. What’s even better than that is to meet up not only with a high school friend but, one who I spent 14 months with in An Loc. Danny White and myself had breakfast on 10/19/2017 (my 69th birthday) for two hours and we swapped memories when we were in An Loc and life after Vietnam. I haven’t seen Danny for decades since he has resided in NJ for many years. I found his post on this site and immediately sent him an E. He told me he was comming to Butler 10/16 and he would contact me. I found this site just in in time when he was coming back to Butler to visit family. Like everyone else when you leave high school you lose cantact with friends and start your own life. Well, the first time I ran into Danny after high school was 5:00am the morning of 5Mar68 in the Butler County Courthouse, PA as we were about to board a bus to be inducted in the Army at the Federal Building in Pittsburgh, PA. I had no idea he was drafted and he had no idea I volunteered for the draft. We took basic together at Fort Dix (same platoon) then got seperated after graduation and I figured until at least we did our time. To make a long story short we ran into each other a few more times after that and even in Long Binh waiting for our assigments. The day he left I said I’ll see you in a year as we said to each other every time we ran into each other. I left Long Binh the following day and flew to An Loc. Who do you think I found at Team 47 that day? Danny White. Let it be know we never went in the Army on the buddy system. Quite a story and yes, we went to Sydney, Australia together, (R&R) we extended 59 days together to get the five month drop off our 24 month hitch, flew back to the states together and flew from San Francisco to Pittsburgh, PA together and we were both toast when we wobbled down the stairs off the plane in Pittsburgh.

    Having breakfast/reunion like we did leads me to the next idea I would like to put out there as food for thought. I see a number of guy’s on this site would like to have a Team 47 reunion. I don’t know how many of you have ever been to Kokomo, Indiana for the annual Vietnam Veterans reunion. It has been held there every year for decades and I was there two different years with Barry Smith I think ’93 and ’94. Let me say that Barrys’ family members were blown away when they were mingling with Nam Vets from all branches and just the atmosphere of the reunion. Barry and I found it to be a very humbling experience especially when they play TAPS. The reunion is held every September and I will be going there myself next year (2018) with my Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 862. Let me say the National Kokomo Vietnam Veterans reunion is awesome. Why couldn’t we plan on that location, being in the midwest, and incorporate one day out of the four day event with a Team 47 reunion? I already know I will be hooking up with Bruce Cozzi and looking forward to that. I’m going to take the liberty to nominate Danny White, Roger Reed, whom I have spoken to over the years and Bruce Cozzi, whom I have spoken to recently because of this site. I think they would make an excellent trio of administration amigos who could put this together rather than just talk about it. Do I hear anyone second this motion? I don’t think it would be to hard finding out how many want to go and we’ll get a block of rooms at the Merriott (that’s where my 862 chapter stays) (or some where else) and guy’s would have the option of staying how ever many days they want. We just have to get the September 2018 dates and and firm up what day we set aside for Team 47 reunion. I’m the first guy with a plan so everyone else can please chime in and let us all know any ideas you may have. Like Roger Reed Said on 11/13/2016 GET ER DONE IN 2017. HOW ABOUT 2018?

    My sincerest regards to all of my Team 47 brothers.

  2. I was at a sub sector to An Loc, specifically at Chon Thanh, in 1965, but stopped in at An Loc a number of times. I just finished watching “The Vietnam War” series by Ken Burns (it’s being shown on PBS channels). An Loc is mentioned a number of times. if you have not seen it, be sure to find it and watch it. It is excellent.

    One of the things that I learned from the series is that as early as 1963, President Kennedy knew that we could never win a war in South Vietnam, due to the situation with the corrupt SVN government, and lack of support from the Buddhist majority and how badly the govt treated them. In addition, the Viet Cong were very dedicated and determined, whereas the govt was not.

    Despite his belief about how unwinnable an American war would be there, Kennedy was concerned that if he did not stand up to the communists, he would not be able to win re-election in 1964. President Johnson also believed the same thing, but each of them kept building up US involvement, sacrificing American lives, in the interest of their own re-elections.

    I find that to be disgusting. I lost friends there, as most of us have. And for nothing.

  3. I was a member of MACV Advisory Team 47 from mid-December, 1968 to late November, 1969. The last five
    months I was the liaison in Siagon shipping supplies back to An Loc. I have pictures and would like to share them.
    brucecozzi@gmail.com

    • AN LOC HISTORY

      Colonel William Benedict Nolde (August 8, 1929 – January 27, 1973) was killed by shell fire at An Loc eleven hours before the cessation of all hostilities in accordance with the Paris Peace Accords. He was the last official American combat casualty of the war – the 45,914th confirmed death during the conflict.

      Nolde was buried on February 5, 1973 in Section 3 of Arlington National Cemetery (his widow Joyce was buried beside him in 2005).

      He was the senior military advisor in An Loc in Binh Long Province. At 43 years of age, he was the oldest graduate of Field Artillery OCS to die in Vietnam. While he was not the last American to die in Vietnam, his death was the last recorded before the cease fire, earning the dubious honor of being the last of 45,941 Americans killed during the conflict.

      As such, his funeral drew not only full military honors but considerably more brass than the funeral of a field-grade officer would normally command. Among 150 or so mourners were General Alexander Haig, the Army Vice Chief of Staff, and Lieutenant General Robert E. Coffin, who had been his Commanding Officer when he served in Italy before his Vietnam tour.

      At Central Michigan University the William B. Nolde Scholarship was established in memory of the Colonel by students, family and friends. The William B. Nolde Lecture Series takes place every two years and invites various politicians, professors and military leaders to lecture on the importance of leadership.

      Comments/Citation
      COL Nolde commanded the 5th Bn, 30th FA in Italy (1969-1971) and is a well remembered member of the “Hard Chargers” of the 30th Field Artillery Regiment. The “SPERRY” Missile Trophy was retired in his name in 1974, and is prominently displayed in the 30th FA Regimental Room, in Snow Hall, at Fort Sill, OK. His service with the 5th Bn, 30th FA has been recorded in “The History of the 30th FA Regiment 1918-1998”. For more information about the “Hard Chargers” of the 30th FA Regiment contact MSG (R) Dan Gillotti, Historian, 30th FA Regiment, (daniel.gillotti@dfas.mil).

      Colonel Nolde enlisted in the Army in 1951 and served during the Korean War. He then attended OCS at Fort Sill. Among his many assignments, he was Assistant Professor of Military Science at Central Michigan University from 1962-1964 before his first tour of duty in Vietnam. He then returned to CMU as APMS for a second time, leaving that position in the fall of 1966. Colonel Nolde also served in Korea, Germany and the Far East. Prior to a third tour in Vietnam he had been stationed in Italy.

      Colonel Nolde was inducted into the Field Artillery OCS Hall of Fame on 16 June 2006

      • Another Team 47 PSA also died in VN. LUV Ray Suarez was PSA when I was there in early 68. He was a great leader. Was moved to Team 67 at Song Be and was KIA on Feb 69 when the NVA overran the MACV compound. Very sad….

      • Sgt Smith, I worked in the Bing Long
        Open Mess Association as a bartender and there was a SSGT in charge of the supplies and also the Club Manager. I was with an Adviser outfit with the Air Force medical called MILPHAP, but I took over as the Club Manager and Sgt Sanders got my Cigarettes and my drinking Liquors for the club. I had beer and sodas brought in by C-130’s using pallets. Do you recall our beautiful red dirt runway? You mentioned a Col. Nolde, but we had a Lt. Col as the CO of the Det. 47 and he was flying on a LOCH helicopter when he was shot down and an Army Major took over command. Do you recall the Lt. Col. ‘S name? Just wondering and trying to keep my memory intact.

        • Hi Frank, SP4 John Smith here. Runway was 1,300 feet long of beautiful red dirt. The largest aircraft that could land there was a C-7 Caribou and I brought quite a few pallets in the duce and a half that I would use to meet the Caribou. The C-7 was the smallest of the transport planes that the Air Force had. I posted below which you may have missed about the LTC that was shot down. I’m not going to attempt to spell his name so let’s try a pronunciation exercise. Does this ring a bell? LTC Per-show-dough. That’s exactly how you pronounce his name and as I posted below it was to my understanding that he was rescused with a broken back. We had a new LTC that took his place in a very short period of time and I can’t remember his name to save my soul. Did SGT Sanders have blonde hair and did we call him Sandy as a nickname? I dropped my camera in the red mud at the air strip the day Danny White and me left An Loc and to this day I never cleaned the red mud from the camera. A little keepsake memory I keep in my Nam box.

          • Nice website, nice memories. What was your official duty at An Loc? I was Assistant District Advisor at An Loc. Sept 68- Sept 69.
            We had a SP4 Smith on our District Team. You? Senior District Advisors Maj Mowery and Maj Hodge.
            Good memory on our LTC. I remember he was evacuation with a severe back injury from a hard emergency landing in a Loach OH-6. I am sure my spelling is no better than yours. Maybe Pachuta? Likely Italian. Short steel- gray hair.
            I checked my OER and I believe his replacement was either LTC Corey or COL Ochs.

            My Interpreter was Sgt Vung. Like a brother and I really miss him. Ideas?
            cheers

            • I was a Medic with the Air Force and we were known as the 552 Milphap and advisors to the civilian hospital. Dr Brezidene was our Commander and TSgt Rausch was our NCOIC. I worked as a bartender in the club and appointed to the Bing Long Open Mess Association Club Manager.

            • Robert, My MOS was 11B10 for nine months then three months before I was due to leave Nam my MOS was changed to 71N20 which was a movements specialist. How do you like that title? I did go to the bush with Major Mowery at times but spent most of my time at the little airstrip of An Loc meeting any aircraft that landed there and by no means was it a busy place. Very boring MOS just hanging at the strip waiting and waiting and waiting never knowing when a plane would show up. But everyday when I brought the mail it was all worth the wait.

              BTW: Maybe Pachuta. Very well could be.

              • Smith, I am sure that was you! You did not realize it at the time, but you saved my life. At the time I did not realize it either. How so?

                The first week in Sept 68 I was on board the Blue and White Air America Beechcraft that touched down on the red dirt strip at An Loc. We had a drop off at Tay Ninh and we were headed to the last stop, Song Be. I was on orders for the Civil Affairs officer at Song Be.

                I hopped off to stretch my legs at the An Loc. You (I am pretty sure) were there to pick up the mail and we chatted a bit. I was not keen for the Civil Affairs assignment and I asked you if there were any openings at An Loc. More in line with my infantry training. (We were young then…) “Yeah, the Assistant District Advisor just left, and I guess that slot is open,” you answered. “They are out in the bush a bit.” I tossed you my duffel, and off we went off to HQ to negotiate.

                Saved my life? Chad’s posting on Sept 22, 2017, mentioned Song Be. The Province Advisor was killed that night, as well as most of the Song Be team, likely the Civil Affairs officer. If it were not for you, that probably would have been me.

                Thanks! I owe you one.

                • Well Robert, you owe me one. I did meet an Air America Beechcraft daily. I had a Top Secret Clearance and I gave a pouch of top secret docuements from our intelligence maybe S-1 Sector , not sure now, to the piolet and in turn he would give me the pouch of docuements he had from the brain trust in Saigon. I guess it was the best was to pass very sensative information without be intercepted by any type of radio. I think I remember the encounter we had. September of ’68 I was surely there. We’ll have to figure out a way we could meet and I can collect a cold one!!! A number of guy’s on this site are talking runion and I am going to post my idea within a couple of days and see how my idea fly’s with everyone. Stay tuned. I’ll be talking September of 2018 location.

  4. I was at a subsector to An Loc for a few months in 1965. I don’t remember the team number, but it was at Chon Thon, advising ARVN popular and regional forces. We did not trust the units we were with at all, so the four of us pulled our own guard duty rotation. The forces we were advising were very poorly trained.

    I posted pictures of our little hut and the area on Shutterly and Flickr if anybody wants to see them. It is difficult to find by doing a search, so if you want to see them, email me at bultena(at)rocketmail.com Just replace the (at) with @. I would post a link to the photos here, but that is not allowed on this site.

    • Very interesting. Did not know there had been a team at Chon Thanh. I did some work with the RF/PF on Hill 128 just north of An Loc. We’d go up there for 2-3 days at a time, work with them on weapons, teaching hygiene (they needed it), medics taught basic first aid, etc., we did some patrolling, setting up better perimeter security, etc.. Hill was high enough you could see a long way; didn’t feel we could trust the RF/PF on the hill at night, so we literally spent a third of each night on watch while the other two guys slept. That was tough duty, so it was a good thing we were only there 2-3 days at a time.

      • Hi Chad, An Loc was the main headquarters for Team 47. I worked at the air strip and on Mon. Wed. and Sat. and I had a work chopper ferry supplies to Chon Thanh and Loc Ninh who were part of Team 47. I was with Team 47 from the first week of Aug. ’68 thru the first week of Oct. ’69.

        • I remember the airstrip. It is gone now, built into the new city. I left An Loc in June 68, so just missed you. Was in An Loc in Feb 15, and the entire MACV compound is gone and rebuilt into a residential area.

          • Chad, Lt. Willette went back to An Loc maybe 15 years ago. He sent me pics. Compound and airstrip gone like you said and I didn’t recognize anything in An Loc. Rebuilt 100% after it was blown off the map during the 60 Day Easter seige in ’72.

            • John…..it is very different from the late 60’s for sure. I was able to get oriented at the circle where the Quan Loi road came up the hill into town from the east. From there, it was easy to find the old compound location, but it sure was gone. A very nice residential area is now there. I always loved An Loc; glad it was rebuilt after the war. Except for the phoney-assed mass grave they constructed in town, it is a very nice place to visit. Chad Spawr.

    • Oops, sorry for the typo. I am too old to remember spelling, it seems. Chon Thanh. Be sure to ask me if you want to see the photos, and I will email you the link to them. My email is given in my earlier post.

  5. Where would this reunion be held? didn’t know this fellow or where he lived, but I wouldn’t mind getting together to share memories of An Loc. It has changed a lot since the war. the MACV compound is long gone, replaced with a pretty nice residential area.

  6. hey anybody interested in visiting terry grahams grave this summer an making it into a reunion?????
    ITS BEEN 48 YEARS THIS MONTH

  7. I was on Advisory Team 81 at SF Camp Long at Hon Quan (An Loc), as an AF FAC (Rod 8), from Dec 66 to Dec 67. Did the new fort change the Team to 47 after I left? I’m not finding much that puts 81 in Binh Long. I’m pretty sure I was there. At least that is the address on the mail I saved.

  8. I do remember your name, Tom. If we can get some guys together in a good place, I’m up for it. Hope to meet you all one day soon. Chad Spawr, Team 47

    • Hi; I was the Psyops Advisor assigned to advisory team in Binh Long Prov from 1 Mar 1964 until late Jul 1964. At that time we were part of the PBT Special Zone. Team # was 88. On July 13. 1964, three (3) members of the team and our Vietnamese interpreter were killed in an ambush near Tao O, along Highway 13 about 12 Kilometers south of the Province Capital of Binh Long. The VC ambushed a Ranger Company on the way to assist a unit in Chon Thanh. There were about 37 Rangers Killed in addition to our Team. Those killed were Maj Joseph William Burkett, PSA, Cpt Billy T Hatfield RF/PF ADV, Cpt Richard Marion Sroka, Rgr Bn ADV. The only reason I was not with them that AM was I has business with the USOM Guy and as I returned to the compound they were ready to leave. I asked Maj Burkett if he wanted me to get my gear and go with them. Maj Burkett, said no, “they better leave somebody back to mind the Store”. A Maj Robert Switzer ( SP) Came to replace Maj Burkett. I was subsequently sent to be the Ben Cat DSA, in Binh Duong Prov
      I do not know when the team # changed but When I was there it was #88 as listed on the Wall. E1, Row 58
      By the way, my name is Forrest Woods, I went on to a 2nd tour in Phu Bon Prov, 1967, Mar, to mar 1968.

      • Hi Forrest,

        I was PSYOP field team leader for 2d Bde 1st Cav Div at Quan Loi and Lai Khe in ’68-69, quite a while after you were there. I’m currently President of the PSYOP Veterans Association (POVA), an association of veterans of US military PSYOP. You clearly qualify for membership, and we’d love to have you with us. You can reach me at chad@spawr.com, and I can send you information on POVA. Looking forward to connecting with you. By the way, during my time at MACV Team 47 (Mar-June ’68, I drove down to Bien Hoa regularly without incident. Driving north of An Loc was virtually impossible, but going southbound was quite safe by then. When I visited Viet-Nam in Feb ’15, we drove Hwy 13 up to Loc Ninh, and it was strange to see that country that I’d only ever seen from the air and on the ground following air insertion. We also drove to Bu Dop and Song Be, none of which I’d seen from the ground before except after being flown in. My how times have changed.

        Welcome Home!

    • Hi Chad. We met by way of a Battle of An Loc memorial page. My first email here was for JohnCusolito. He and I met in Loc Ninh in 69. I spent my second year in An Loc and left in August of 71 about six months before that battle. I’d like to see a reunion if we can round up a group.

      Tom Friedel

  9. I worked the comm room & the cooks & supplies and some facility support.
    I left in Sept of 69 and I was in the adjacent underground when they got them done.

    • Hey Bac Si, how are you? We spent time in Loc Ninh together in 69 – 70. A reunion would be interesting. Chad Spawr and I have traded emails, although a few years ago. Where do you call home? Maybe that will help us decided where to hold a reunion.

  10. Appreciate that. My memory holds 4 specific dates for 66-67 and 71-72. Then of course his discharge in 1980 from Fort Riley, his final assignment. Why would assuming knowledgeable people deny the existence of one of the Teams?

  11. P.S.: If memory serves me right someone posted here about the death of a Colonel. And if memory serves me right he was in a riverboat that had just left Rach Gia. My husband took pictures of the riverboat after the recovery.

  12. I entered a query quite a few months ago about my husband and received minimal info about Team 47. His name was Charles Joseph Prusik (aka Chuck). He was approximately ten years older then most of the men over there so I really didn’t expect anyone to remember him. I had been in touch with the commander of his unit at Rach Gia but also got minimal information since the commander had only been with the unit before they had an overrun by the Viet Cong, shortly after which my husband was transferred.

  13. Sorry—-I don’t have his files anymore–sent them to the family to avoid fights about who got everything when he died—my memory say 44, but I may have a subliminal memory of 47 also. I know the higher echelon were playing games with the unit numbers sooo…. Again apologies:
    Donna

  14. After his death when I was trying to straighten out my husband’s tours in Viet Nam every time I mentioned Team 47 I hit a blank wall. They either claimed it was eliminated/never existed/never heard of. Curious to see if you have any remarks about this. He went from Team 44 to Rach Gia near a Sea Bee project. You know the situation, secret missions into the jungles of every connecting country around and raids into the Michellin Plantation–etc.; etc.

  15. Marvin, the cut/paste works, but some numbers and % characters also appear around the “DOT”. Correcting the path statement does work and I enjoyed your photos. Thanks for posting them. Liked the old-school boots and fatigues. Bruce

    • Okay, my posts with the links to where you can find the photos of Chon Thanh keeps getting deleted, so I guess y’all will just have to do a google or bing search to find it. You can search for Saigon 1965 on Shutterfly or go to shutterfly and try to find it. Whatever.

      • Or you can email me and I would be happy to send you the link. bultenaATrocketmail.com Of course, replace the AT with the @ symbol.

    • I really don’t know why I spent the many hours and money it took to scan my slides of Chon Thanh, etc., in order to share them with all of you who might have enjoyed them. The hours included not only scanning them but a LOT of time trying to color correct them and improve them. I’ve made several attempts to point to the location of the photos. However, it has all been fruitless, as every attempt I have made has resulted in the posts with the links being deleted, and it seems doing a google search or going to shutterfly to try to find them is not successful without a specific link.

      So, I made the attempt, and if you want them, you’ll just have to get a message to me so I can email a link to you.

      • My name is Frank Cowart and I was assigned with 552 Milphap MACV as an Air Force adviser from July 1968-July 1969. While there our Army CO was a Lt.Col in US Army and was killed while flying in a LOCH helicopter. My commander was a Capt. ( USAF) Brezidene, M.D. I worked for a TSGT Rausch . If anyone out there recalls any info about what the Army CO ‘s name was let me know. Thanks

        • Hi Frank, my name is John Smith and I was with Team 47 from the first week of Aug. 68 thru the first week of Oct. 69. If we are on the same page we did lose our Team 47 Army CO who was a LTC while flying in a LOCH. It was my understanding that he was rescued with a broken back. Now for the name I will give it a try and I’m sure I will botch this bad with spelling but sound this out. LTC Per-show-dough. Ring a bell?

          • The back injury fits my recollection as well. We were told that they performed an autorotation landing that was violent enough to cause the injury. Subsequent to that news, I never heard (or do not recall) any updates.

          • John, I’m interested in any photos of our An Loc compound that you may be willing to share. I’ve managed to lose mine, over the years. My grandson is now a Marine and I’d like to be able to share some of my history with him.
            Bruce

            • Bruce, I do have some pictures of our compound but not many. I also have an aerial picture of the ‘ole Team 47 Graham ~ Browne compound. I worked at the air strip and had a work chopper ferry supplies to Loc Ninh and Chon Thanh three times a week to our extended Team 47 members. I asked the chopper piolet one day if he would fly my over the compound and get some aerial shots. He said no problem, get in and away we went and circled the compound. You’ll have to give me an E address for me to send them to you. I don’t have many but I’m sure they will bring back memories. I just sent some pictures to Danny White but he gave me his E address. So your grandson is a Marine. Awesome!!!

  16. I’ve been trying a long time to post a link here to some photos of Chon Thanh that I uploaded to Shutterfly. None of the comments with the link would post. I think I have finally figured out why. This site doesn’t allow links.

  17. Carl Thompson (posted by wife) was in Chon Thanh from June 68 through May ’69. He was a Radio Operator. We just uploaded pictures of Chon Thanh if you are interested. We are looking for as much information as possible to support his VA disability application. He remembers serving with the following, AF Sargent Ed Maldinaro, Sgt Simms, Sgt Jones, Sgt Peffly Sargent Flowers and his first CO was Captian Johnson. He does not remember the name of the CO who replaced him. If any of you were there during that time or might have information that would support his recollection of his experiences please e-mail me at: Lhanksthomp@yahoo.com. Thank you, we appreciate any assistance you could provide.

    • Carl and wife, where did you post the pictures? Would love to see them . You can see mine (see my above post).

      I hope you are able to get the information you need for Carl’s disability.

  18. I have located my old photos (slides) from Vietnam taken in 1965. Several of Chon Thanh, plus Ham Tan, Saigon, etc. Once I convert them to digital, and since I normally do NOT post photos on-line, does anyone have any ideas of where I can post them so others can have access?

    Thanks.

    • Marvin, You might consider using “Dropbox”, a FREE utility made for that very purpose. One can upload photos (or any files for that matter) to folders created/named by the user, then Share those folders with specific other parties. You would have to know email addresses for those persons, as it must be entered to Share the folder. That person then receives an email link to the folder(s) you’ve shared with them. Just Google “Dropbox”, download the application and set it up. It’s easy and intuitive. I, for one would like to see those photos, so please post when you’re ready to go. I’ll be happy to provide my email address. And thanks for being willing to share your photos. I’ve lost most of mine.

      • Thank you so much for the suggestion. I will open a DropBox account, and also probably Shutterfly and maybe a few others if anybody has any more suggestions, to make it easy for people to access them.

        I just got done going through the slides. The slides were really mixed up, and they all have dust spots. Also, as they are 50 years old, and I am 50 years older, it is hard to identify just where some of the shots were taken, as I had moved around to different locations while in Vietnam.

        However, there are about 50 slides of Saigon (including a few of Ton Son Nhut), and maybe around 30 or so of Chon Thanh (not very many of the village, as being only 19 or 20 at the time, I was NOT very talented when it came to selecting subject matter). After I left Chon Thanh, I went to Ham Tan, and there are about 35 or so slides around there.

        There are several I cannot tell where they were taken, and then several more that I most likely have misidentified, so do have patience, and once I get them posted, please help me correct any misidentified ones or those I could not identify.

        It’ll take me maybe a week to get them scanned, then maybe another week to clean them up a bit in Photoshop Elements.

        Does anyone else have photos at these various locations? I’ve been in Phouc Vinh, Ap Bo La, An Loc (briefly, on my way down to Chon Thanh), Chon Thanh, and Ham Tan.

        Thanks.

      • Bruce, I’ve posted the Chon Thanh photos to Shutterfly (see above) but have also put them in DropBox. If you want them via DropBox, let me have your email and I will add you there. Same applies to anyone else who wants them from DropBox.

  19. Bob Tarbet. I was with Adv Tm 47 when it was in Tuy Hoa, 1963-part of ’64. I was an assistant infantry battalion advisor with 2/47. Bill Privette was with 1st Battalion and an artillery 1st Lt was with 3d Battalion. Life was pretty good for the advisory team in Tuy Hoa. I understand things went south after the regiment moved. I switched to Adv Tm 28 at Tuy Hoa and became the Hq Commandant. I like to call my job the Hq comedian. email L1usma62@sbcglobal.net

  20. You would not believe Chon Thanh now. I was there in February. It has moved onto Hwy 13, is a big bustling town with beautiful buildings, paved highway, lots of shops, tremendous area. I was surprised and impressed. No matter what else happened, capitalism won.

    • I sure do believe you. Photos I took at the time are lost somewhere, so I went on the internet to try to find some the way Chon Thanh was circa 1965 and found none. Instead, there were a lot of current photos which blew me away. Wow, what a change! You are right in that capitalism actually did win.

      BTW, I see notations in some posts that they uploaded photos to the site, but I have not figured out how to access them. Do you know, or does anybody know. I am after photos of An Loc, Chon Thanh, Phouc Vinh, Ham Tan, villages in War Zone D (I was with a couple ARVN ranger companies there in ’65 but cannot find anything on that ranger compound or the village we were in). On this site, I can’t identify the Phouc Vinh team.

  21. I remember Chon Thanh in ’67 to ’69 as a dusty ville just east of Hwy 13. When I was there, we could usually travel Hwy 13 up to An Loc without much trouble, although there were occasional ambushes and snipers. I actually drove a Jeep alone from Quan Loi to Bien Hoa and back the next day without trouble. Stupid in hindsight, but I made it. I can imagine how bad it was in ’65.

    No way we could ever drive up to Loc Ninh from An Loc. Just too dangerous. Great memoire! Thanks.

    • Yes, it appeared to be a very sleepy little village. Behind the scenes, however, there was a lot of VC activity. If any of us needed to go into the village, such as for a haircut or to get something, or to perform medical services for the villagers, we all went, There was no electricity in the village that I was aware of or remember.

      Even in the Regional/Popular Forces compound where our hut was, there was no electricity. In the evening, the Vietnamese commander sometimes ran a generator. We were lucky enough to have a refrigerator in our hut which was powered by propane, but we didn’t always get a supply of propane to run it.

      Unlike you, Chad, we never tried the main road to go any great distance. You were very lucky. When the ARVN rangers or any of the R/P forces went up the road, 9 times out of 10 they were ambushed, if my memory serves me.

      When I was there, I didn’t understand or appreciate how much of a hotbed of enemy activity it was. But even so, we were prepared to bug out very quickly if anything serious happened.

      Once we were pulled out of there, I went back to Phouc Vinh for a couple of weeks, then on to Ham Tan.

      Regarding An Loc, I thought the French country club was really something. Gorgeous. Large covered but open-air rooms, lots of marble, etc. I understand it was destroyed in a battle either later in 65 or maybe it was 66.

  22. I was at An Loc for several days in 1965 while waiting for transport down to Chon Thanh, a bit south. While at An Loc, I went with some other guys out to a French owned rubber plantation, to a club house they had there, and had some drinks.

    After being with the MACV team in Chon Thanh for a few months, our four man team was dispersed, and replaced by a special forces A-Team. The medic on our team, a really great guy, was transferred to either An Loc or Loc Ninh (don’t remember which now). Unfortunately, a week or so later, VC attacked the MACV compound there and he was killed. That really saddened me. He was always giving of himself, and helping others, including locals, making him popular with the locals. I heard the VC had a price on his head.

    While at Chon Thanh, I contracted amebic dysentery and spent a week in the hospital in Saigon. As we didn’t trust the local ARVN units, we pulled our own guard duty all night long. Being down one, it was a real burden to the others, working during the day, then rotating on guard duty at night, so I made it back to Chon Thanh as soon as the doctors released me.

    The amebic dysentery was no fun, with bright green “stuff” coming out both ends. Totally disgusting. No idea how I got it, as all four of us were very careful.

    • The team I was with in Chon Thanh advised regional and popular forces. Another four-man team advised a couple of ARVN ranger companies. Our paths seldom crossed except on special occasions, such as if we got our hands on a generator and movie projector, and set up a white cloth in an open area near our hut and invited the local ARVN military guys and other locals to watch a movie with us. That happened very rarely.

      The forces we were advising were trigger happy with their 105mm artillery pieces, always sending out rounds into the countryside, so we were constantly on the radio advising choppers coming in to approach from certain directions only. There was a field right outside our hut that was big enough to land two Huey’s at a time, max. Other than a road that went up to An Loc as well as further south (which was way too dangerous for us to travel on), our only mode of transport was via Huey. There was no airstrip.

      Chon Thanh was on a known route for the NVN forces and VC when traveling between War Zones C and D. At one point, we got word they were scare to death to travel that trail because a man-eating tiger was in the area. Apparently it had taken out several of them. Go Tigers! Never heard what happened after that, if they got it, or it got more of them.

  23. Send me an email at “spawrtan@wideopenwest.com” and I’ll send you some pic’s of An Loc today and the old compound area.

    • Send me an email at “spawrtan@wideopenwest.com” and I’ll send you some pic’s of An Loc today and the old compound area.

  24. I’d love a picture or two of the An Loc compound. I took pictures of the old compound location as it looks today. Was just there in February. Totally changed!

    • Chad, I’ve often thought of going back. How did you accomplish the trip? Were you free to travel anywhere you wanted, or were you restricted to “tours”? I would like to see your photos of the current site. Can you direct me to your gallery, or to where you have them posted?
      Bruce

  25. Hi, anyone here serve MAT 47 Rach Gia April 1970 and recall Charles Joseph Prusik; Providence Ready Reaction Team; Battle of Chau Duc in Cambodia that left with 144 RFs, interpreter. Later 3 Lieutenants airlifted due to injuries and returning with only 18 active returning?

  26. I believe your right, Thanks. I’ve got a few pictures of the monkey and others if I can find them I’ll post them, Thanks, Greg

    • Greg, I’ve lost almost all of my photos of the An Loc compound. Any you could share would be appreciated. That freak’n monkey bit my hand and drew blood a few days before I was to leave country in July ’69. I didn’t report it, as I was not about to have my departure delayed. I guess luck was on my side; I didn’t pick up any strange monkey-born illnesses.

      • Barry, My name is Tommy Granert, I was the Company Clerk and also ran the Mail Room. I got there close to the end of July 69. I think I remember you. were you about 6′ with a flat top hair cut? I remember George in the tree in front of the mess hall. He was still there when I left in August of 70 the best that I can remember. tommygranert@msn.com

    • Hey Danny Boy, John Smith here. Let me set the record straight about all three monkey’s in the compound. I was the first owner of a monkey at the expense of Barry Smith. He bought a monkey for my 20th birthday (10/19) from the montagnard’s for $5 MPC. I gave her to Lt. Rodriguez MAT-TEAM CO. the day I left for home and you were with me. We extended 59 days together to get the 5 month drop from our 24 month hitch.
      Monkey number two was owned by Lt. Willette named Dufus and Dufus was dumber than dumb. He had no tail and looked like an over grown rat when he got lose running through the compound. Monkey number three was a Rock Ape owned my SFC Kirby and was pure mean to the bone. He was tied up on a wire run between the mail room and the club. He got hold of Barry’s dog one time and made love to it. I saw it. This Rock Ape was bad news and I knew his name to be Sam. I kept my distance from Sam because I used to torment him and if he ever got hold of me I would have been a KIA at the expense of Sam. I am dead serious.

      BTW: When Barry gave my the monkey I called him George because he had a pair of stones. To my dismay female monkey’s also have stones (go figure) so I changed the name to Gorogitta. One time when the 11th ACR was on a three day stand down at the airstrip I found out they had a monkey named Mike. So, I took Georgitta down to the strip to meet Mike with the thought of having baby monkeys and Col. Patton Jr. who was the CO of the 11th ACR (Gen. Patton’s son) saw what we were up to and he came over and said he didn’t want my monkey abused. I left her there for three day’s and nothing happened. Georgitta was honked off at me for a week after that. She was to young to breed.

      Other than that Danny, how the heck are you doing? I heard your in NJ with the family. I’m still in Butler retired and living the dream.

  27. I was on a 5-man MAT team with the 47th group up in Loc Ninh, north of An Loc. The year was 1971 and our team Commander was an Infantry Major whose name escapes me at the time. He was a former Special Forces captain who sustained a head wound during a previous ‘Nam tour. Our “Operation Phoenix” Intelligence officer was a Lieutenant York who was purported to be the grandson of WWII hero Sgt. York. We supported the ARVN 74th Ranger Battalion and shared their base camp. During that time our individual 5-man team served on several individual ARVN outposts manned mainly by Cambodians and Montagnards. During my last 4-5 months of my tour there my team was phased out as part of the U.S. withdrawal taking place. My remaining tour time was then spent in An Loc at the TOC as a night time security officer. My main duties there included keeping up with individual team ambushes, plotted artillery, gunship support, and Med Evac choppers, and then reporting all the night’s activities during our morning briefings. It was during that time that I befriended a Captain Wannat who later became a POW after my departure. Did anyone else on this site serve up in Loc Ninh during ’70-’71? I’d love to hear from you. If yes, please feel free to call or text me at 501-551-0362. Thank you brothers.

    • The Majors Name was Blair. I think you where the medic. Yamata (SFC) was the infantry coordinator. Huel (S/SGT) was your Phoenix guy. Lt. York was the Intel Officer. I have photo of all five Americans together. You replaced a medic names Zapeda.

    • I served as Phoenix/DIOCC Officer for Team 47 for most of 1970. I later transferred to Team 86 in Tan An. The name of the major in charge escapes me at this moment, but he had been a former non-commissioned officer if I recall correctly.

    • I was with MAT 47 from summer of 70 to summer of 71 but I don’t remember these names. I was not up north but in the main compound.

  28. 8 Jan 1972 to 9 Jan 1973 …came from Baumholder, Germany to find I had been invited an unfriendly party. Home a week before going to Arlington for the Colonel’s funeral and burial.

  29. I was assigned to Team 47 from Mar – Jun 68; worked with the Province S3 and Civil Affairs. SSG Loveday, SP4 Transue, CPT Sheiner,SP4 Terrell. We had a little yellow dog we called “Bear.” He came with us from the 1st Infantry Division at Quan Loi.

  30. This is from Greg Mortland, Aug 68 – Sept 69, does anyone remember the name of the Lt. with the pet monkey ?

    • No, but that F’ing monkey didn’t like me for some undetermined reason! Used to screech at me while I was walking past to the mess hall.
      W. Bruce Morton, Sp4, 1st Signal Btn (attached)

    • Greg, I’m Lou Hart, on Team 47 from Sep 69. I lived in the hooch by the tree where the monkey lived. ( we called him Dufus). I was a 2 Lt when I arrived. It’s been a few years since you posted this but I just found the site.

    • Hi Greg, I think I remember you. John Smith here. Lt. Willitte owned Dufus without a tail. Lt. Willitte was also the one of two Lt.’s that were hit with shrapnel from a tree burst from a 122mm rocket in May of ’69. I talked to him maybe 10 years ago and he remembered me driving him and the other LT. to the soccer field to be medevac’d to Quan Loi. Can’t think of the other LT. for the life of me and have no idea as to what was his fate.
      Barry Smith rode shotgun for me and leaving the compound after midnight some time was a little unnerving to say the least.

  31. bruce morton, yes without faces i forget also.
    my name is roger reed i was with macv 47 from aug 68
    thru nov 69. i worked in s1 section with ray rappazzinni
    was in underground barracks with greg morton, john smith
    chet mochel john cheney

  32. I was Signal, attached to MACV compound in An Loc (Team 47) from Nov 1968 through July 1969. We must have run a million miles of single-pair phone wire around that town before they came and installed the 100-pair cable (which was immediately cut by rocket shrapnel). I recognize some of your names; but without photos… you know how it is.
    Dom Sementelli was the chap who died following the jeep accident. He was one of our foursome for pinochle. And, of course, I remember the sad loss of Lt. Terry Graham and Lt. Earl Browne. Just before that, the sergeant who shared the cement guard-post/bunker by the laundry room with me (during attack) was wounded by rocket shrapnel en route to the post, and was shipped out for surgery. He was the one who supplied out little closet sized “PX” from his trips to Saigon. Wish I could remember his name.
    (W.) Bruce Morton, Sp4
    36th Signal Btn
    brucemorton@inbox.com
    Facebook: Bruce Morton

    • Bruce,

      I am “Dom’s” sister and was in the 8th grade when he died. We knew him as Mike. He was my father figure as my dad worked nights. His death devastated my mom and the rest of the family. He left behind 2 brothers and 3 sisters a wife and 6 month old daughter. he would have been a proud grand pa to 3. My parents and 2 sisters have since passed as well. I miss him everyday. do you remember anything about him?

      • Barbara,
        It’s been 48 years so my memories are not complete. I do recall that “Mike” (in the Military we only referred to one another by last names) was a likeable chap and a VERY proud father. I remember seeing a photo he’d received of his wife and daughter. I don’t know if he ever got to see her in person; but regardless he was looking forward to getting back home. As I previously stated, he was a fourth for our Pinochle games. I’m not, nor was I ever, much of a card player, but I really enjoyed those games. We stopped playing after his death, and I never played that game again. I guess I’m saving that memory. I recall the day of his death vividly, or at least the portion when a vehicle came racing into our small compound with an another Air Force member clutching his badly broken arm from the accident. The story of the incident (as I recall it): There was a “two lane” dirt road leading from An Loc, the province capital of the Binh Long province, to Quan Loi, a base camp a few miles away. The road ran through a French rubber plantation and the trees had been cut down on both sides of the road to provide a modicum of security. The jeep in which they were riding was forced off the road by a truck passing other trucks and struck the stump of a tree. We heard about Mike’s injury and I mistakenly thought that he would recover. He was not returned to our compound, but I don’t know if he was taken to the little “hospital” the Air Force MD’s operated in An Loc, was airlifted directly to Bien Hoa, or went to an aid station in Quan Loi first. We learned a couple of days later of his fate. I’m certain that I’m not the only one who remembers him and looks back on that time with sadness. Only later in my life did I realize how difficult that war had been on mothers and younger siblings. The recent Ken Burns documentary “The Vietnam War” has really brought that home. We were young and felt invincible. The only reason the military works is that young men feel that way. But we were not, and the real pain was realized by the loved ones left behind. I lost several friends from my home town; one was a fellow who was drafted with me. And of course the two Team 47 LT’s Graham and Browne, with whom I was acquainted by not friends. I can’t even imagine how terrible it must have been for your family. So please know that Mike was a good man doing what had to be done with comrades who still miss him, and convey my sympathies to your family, especially his daughter. Warm regards, Bruce
        P.S. While I have no photos of Mike, there are a couple of photos that may be of interest to you. I can be reached on Facebook (Bruce Morton) or at nmip.bruce@gmail.com

        • Thank you so much for responding Bruce. Mike did get to see his daughter Patty. I have several pictures of him holding her.

          Pinochle.. ah that brings back many memories. My dad taught us all how to play. We played 6 handed. My dad had the uncanny ability to know who had what in their hands. My dad was one of 13 and 1 of 7 brothers. 6 of them were in the military. my dad was in the Navy during WWII.

          I was so young when Mike died. I remember the day (even at 62) vividly when they came to get me from school and I was screaming and crying he’s dead isn’t he. The lunch room went very silent. Mike was the best!! He always encouraged me to do well in school and was there to fix my bike. He left behind many friends here. One of his good friends was also a casualty of the Vietnam war. Mike planned to make the Air Force his career. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think of him and wish he could have seen his daughter grow into a beautiful woman and mom to 3 children. he would have been a proud grandpa.I will look you up on facebook.

          thank you again and God bless you for your service to our country,
          Barb

  33. I cannot say that I remember him exactly, but I do remember two of our brothers killed at a village just south of town one night not too long before I returned to the states. I also remember the team holding a memorial service for the two plus another brother that was fatality injured in a jeep roll over just three or four days before that.
    I do remember Roger Reed and the day he left the LZ on a chopper headed home.

    • Greg, I’m pretty sure I remember you. The memorial service was held on 31March1969 somewhere in An Loc. Don’t remember where.
      First LT Terry D. Graham KIA 28March1969 at Duc Vinh (2) Hamlet
      First LT Earl F. Browne KIA 28March at Duc Vinh (2) Hamlet
      Sargent Dominic M. Sementelli died 25March1969 result of a vehicle accident.
      I still have the pamplet that was handed out as to the memorial preceedings.
      Very sad day for Team 47. I knew all three quite well.

      • John, I jest saw your reply. Mike Sementelli was my brother. He is so very missed by his family. I see you knew him well over there. Can you tell me anything about him or have any photos of him over there? I miss him so much :(. although I was only in 8th grade he was my father figure. His death devastated our family. When he came back for interment he didn’t look like the person I knew. my poor mom had to look for his chicken pox scar. To her dying day (at age 90) I know she never recovered from his death.

        • Hi Barbara, I read your heartfelt post and it stopped me in my tracks with my sincere and deepest sympathy for you and your family, especially your mom. I can only echo what Bruce Morton posted and it was well said. Your brother was well liked by all. Happy go lucky, always upbeat, great attitude and just a heck of a nice guy. The kind of guy you want as your friend. I was not much of a picture taker when I was there so I can’t help you with any pictures of your brother. The only thing that I have as I mentioned above was the pamplet that we were given prior to the Boots & Helmet Cermony which was held at a religious structure in An Loc. I suspect when you read all the posts from Team 47 guy’s you can’t help but have your feelings surface with tremendous sadness. I feel for you. God Bless you and your family. You can be real proud of your brother.

  34. Team 47, Sept 68 – Sept 69, Lots of memories, some good, some bad, especially warm Schlitz beer at the movies ! Greg Mortland.

      • Served in An Loc wth 2nd Civil Affairs Company, attached to MACV Team 47, from October ’70 to June ’71 as a Vietnamese intetpreter/translator. Mike and I were in the same dorm our freshman year at the University of Pennsylvania and used to play boxed war games from the Avalon Hill company. He especially liked the Desert Fox game, based on the exploits of Erwin Rommel. Mike’s roommate was Fred Krieger from Missoula, Montana. Mike became Battalion Commander of the Penn Army ROTC program during our senior year (’67-’68). I hope some of this information is of use to you. I am so sorry for your loss. It has been a very long time since our experience in the war, but time does not erase the memories. Please drop me a line if you find the time. I live in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, now. I turned 70 last February.

  35. found a picture of you sitting on psp next to me drinking beer along with 11 other guys. from the picture I remember korstad, chaney, rap, wilkins, and the 2 smiths.others I remember include grimm (s-3), cozzi S-4,suttles S-2, and Lt evans.

  36. yup yup remember you yes i worked with rappazinni lt lauretti and lt talbert went by that s-3 section all the time remember korstad think he was in for many years

  37. rog
    i remember Rap, he worked in the S 1 shop. john smith and I were from the same hometown and were drafted together. I worked in the S2 shop with Korsted then the S3 bunker under Maj Mowery.

  38. Dan, dont remember names very well. a few name pop into my head every now and then.
    ive gotten letters from ray rappazinni, chet mochel. they gave me couple more names tommy garnet, the smith boys. its just been so long

  39. no one has left any msg here yet guess ill be first one

    many memories of team 47 in 1968 -1969 long time ago

    but still remember. sp4 roger reed

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