Team 70 ARVN 5th Infantry Division

MACV Team 70 – Lai Khe-Phu Loi-Binh Duong.

This Page is intended for the discussion of the Military Assistance Command Vietnam Team 70 located in Lai Khe-Phu Loi-Binh Duong.

543 thoughts on “Team 70 ARVN 5th Infantry Division

  1. My brother, Captain John Vaughn, was a member of Team 70. He was KIA near Binh Duong on June 09, 1970, during his second tour of duty in Vietnam. I would love to hear from anyone who knew him.

  2. I have just found this website and would be so greatfull if anyone could share anything you might know about my Dad – Captain Paul Jackson. He was killed in action January 24, 1970. Some information was provided to us but being so young it was hard to comprehend what life was like there and the circumstances of his death. It was very painful thing for our Mom to talk about very much. Thank you to everyone that served. You are heros.

  3. I served with Team 70 at Lai Khe from Sept “70 to Feb. “71. Just discovered this site yesterday and have been reading the postings to see many familiar names of brothers I served with during my short time in country. Seems like a lifetime ago. Hope all of you are well and enjoying the “Golden Years”

  4. Does anyone remember Infantry CPT Robert J. Voss. He was KIA on 07/08/1965 in Tay Ninh Province and his unit was listed as ADV Team 70. He started his tour 03/17/65. He was in the Maintenance Directorate, HQ 1st Log Cmd when I arrived in country in May of 65, I believe he was on his second Vietnam tour. He wanted out of 1st Log and he made a trade with an Ordnance officer coming into MACV. The story that ran through 1st Log when he was killed was that he had been ambushed with an ARVN Infantry battalion and everyone on the foray were killed. I think that is probably a myth. I can find nothing to substantiate that event which would have been very big deal in 1965.

    • My Name is Ed Warneld I served with Cpt Voss LT Moodey,SGG Smith and SGT Bruno who were KIA that day. I was transferred Back to Phu_Loi in Apr of 65. I remember as they recovered the bodies Americans and ARVN Officers.I have talked to SGT Bruno’s brother over the years

      Ed Warneld ewarneld@hotmail.com

      • SGT Paul Bruno, my oldest son is name for him. He and I were good friends. Great individual and a very good friend. I still have photos of him some where in the boxes I carried around during my time in the service. He was killed the day before I left Saigon for home and it was quit a shock to me, I had loss another friend. Does and one remember Jerry Binger?

          • July 1964 to July 1965, started out as the S/A clerk typist, lasted all of four hours, and when they found out I couldn’t type, but had a security clearance. They put me in the S1 and the S2. When we moved to Phu Loi I also served as the noon time relief in the TOC on the radio. Most the time I was just a fill-in for anybody that needed help couldn’t stand sitting in one place very long.I was a Nike Hercules missile crewman but had a clerk typist MOS because I worked on a simulator out of the G3 and they put me in a clerk typist position to keep me.

    • I believe Capt Robert J Voss was in the 2nd Battalion, 9th Regiment, 5th ARVN Infantry Division. Other Americans KIA July 8, 1965 were 1lt Larry G Moody, SSG Herbert Smith & Sgt Paul Bruno. All were AT-70. I have no idea about the casualties of the 2/9th. I was not there.

  5. On behalf of a friend, Jeff Davis, son of Sidney (Sid) Davis trying to locate a Csptain Robert Douglas with whom Sid served in Vietnam Nam 1965/66. MAC V Advisory team 70.
    Any information would be appreciated.
    Thanks

    • Barb, I can’t help Jeff find Captain Douglas but I have great memory or two I would like share with Syd if he is still with us or if not with his son.

      My name is Mike La Londe and if this is the same Syd from Phu Loi I would like to get in touch. Thanks

      • Hi Michael,

        Im Jeff Davis, Sid’s son. Please feel free to contact me directly at my email address attached to this email. Once I receive your email, We can have a phone conversation just to be sure we are connecting you to the right person. Thanks for the reply and I hope to hear from you soon.

        Jeff Davis

  6. As I posted earlier, I was with the ASA (Radio Research) cover name, with a small 2 and 2 man Radio Direction Finding team at Phu Hau Dong late Aug. 66 – early Sept. 66. We lived in the old French mansion as guests of the MACV team there. There was an E-4 Radio Op there who had somehow managed to get then Sen. Robert Kennedy to deliver flowers to a girl back home in New York. Does anyone know who I am talking about? I have a couple pictures of him manning his radio. Not sure he would remember me or “us” though?

  7. Vern Greunke here former “Radio Research” guy. (ARMY Security Agency) we operated a PRD-1 Portable? radio direction finding unit out on the helipad at Ben Cat. Aug. 66-July 67 (more or less) would love to hear from anyone in that area from MACV team. I was also at Phu Hoa Dong, Thoi Hoa (just south of BC, and Trung Lap. Went on “runs” up to Lai Khe at times also. Have DVD with 330 pictures of the area at the time. Would send to anyone who was there or remembers me (or not) I do recall a red headed Lt. or Cpt. from Omaha area working with an orphanage or something. Wondering if he is still in area. I live close to Omaha.
    Vern Greunke

    • Robert Bell here,…I served w/ tm70, 69 to71 @ Lai Khe. and points north within the AO of
      the 9th Regt. 4th Batallion . I would sincerely like to have a copy of your DVD w/ 330 pictures
      of the area. My memory is real bad and the pictures help jog my memory. Great to hear from you

    • Hi Vern, would you have any pictures of Phu Hoa Dong ARVN compound? I was there as a tower guard in 1969 for the 1st of the 8th Artillery 25th Infantry Division.
      Bob

  8. Thanks lm larry Eagen was with 2/7/5div nov 65 until middle 1966 then was wounded June 10 at phu hoa after a week at phi loi i returned to P H Dong later l was switch to tm 91 left Vietnam nov 66 would like info on arvn Lt Hai arty fo for 2/7/5div 1966 thanks

  9. Hello Gentleman,
    I think I have a picture of the plaque you are referring to. The picture was taken at Lam Son on 10 May, 1969 and has 59 names on it.

    It is part of a memorial service booklet prepared for my family after the death of my father, Cpt. I. F. Padron, MACV Senior Advisor Team 70 (ARVN/ 3 BTN/ 9 REGT/ 5 DIV) who died at Song-Be, RVN on 6 May,1969

    The booklet was forwarded to our family by Brigadier General Carlton Preer, Jr., MACV III CORPS. It includes several excellent pictures of the service including; “THE CALL TO ATTENTION” which shows a very clear picture of over 50 very solemn US soldiers, the “MEMORIAL ADRESS” by Chaplain (CPT) Robert H. VOGT, “THE EULOGY” by Col. James H. Leach. As well as pictures of many soldiers “IN PRAYER”. The faces of the US Soldiers are very clear but unfortunately unknown to me.

    If any of any of you would like a copy of these pictures please send your email to the address listed below and I will forward them to you. The faces of these very young men are for the most part very clear and distinguishable. I have no doubt you will recognize many of them.

    Thank you for your service

    Regards,
    Roberto Padron, AIA
    RPadron99@aol.com

    PS: My father also sent home 100’s of great pictures of him with his fellow US Advisors, Counterparts and ARVN soldiers. Many pictures were taken in the field/bush while others are of tired men at rest. I wish I had names to go with the faces!

  10. I have a photo of the Memorial Plaque we had in mid-1970 at Lai Khe. It has 68 names on it. Unfortunately the individual names are not legible but the dedication plaque is. I have often wondered to what became of that plaque.

    • Mike, I also have a photo of the plaque. Mine was taken by Carl A. Farren of Team 70 in 1968, and he posted it on Flickr, I think. He stated that the plaque was dedicated in Oct. 68, and it had 45 names on it at the time. That was 45 killed out of 177 who had served with Team 70 in the preceding four years, Carl said. I guess it made the move to Lai Khe. I’ve often wondered about its fate, too. I have the names of 57 Team 70 KIAs, so obviously there are–sadly–more than that. I only have names for three who gave their lives in ’71 and ’72, and there were at least five who died in 1970. If you want this pic, my email is further down the thread.

    • Does anyone know when the team was disbanded? I suppose in 1973 sometime. It must have been quite small by then. By late ’71 they were sending people like me home early. I wasn’t supposed to leave Team 91 until Jan 72 and they cut a month off my time. Some others on Team 91 were asked in early ’72 if they wanted to leave early also. I hope the last guy out the door took the plaque with him. We haven’t heard from anyone later than ’72.

      • I don’t know anything about teams or disbanded, but I did read once that after the NVA overtook Saigon they had to return north to take out pockets of resistance and the article ended with something like this. “The last South Vietnamese flag came down at Lai Khe …. and the war was over”

        • Wow, that would be something. Thanks for the info. I wonder what publication that was in. I heard somewhere that the 5th ARVN commanding general committed suicide rather than be captured.

          • Check with Zippo Smith ( this website ) he was captured at Loc Ninh and has the complete story on the general

        • Brigadier General Le, Nguyen Vy committed suicide at 11:00 AM on April 30th, 1975 at the 5th Division Headquarters in Lai Khe

          • That’s really too bad. Can’t say I blame him. It would have been really bad for him when captured. There was no hope.

            • I would guess Lai Khe was completely isolated and cut off by that time. No way out. Being captured was simply not an option that I completely understand for a person in that position.

            • This is well known to the Vietnamese Community. In fact, there were 5 generals committed suicide at the fall of Saigon (April 30th, 1975).

          • To answer my own question, an internet search under Brig. Gen. Le Nguyen Vy comes up with several interesting web sites regarding him and other generals, especially in those last days. A real tragedy to lose top people like that. They were loyal to their country to the end.

    • IN early 65 the Coumpound at Phu-Loi construction was started with about four people with PAand E It was just about finished when I PCS in Oct 65. At that time the Compound had no name just Arvn 5th HQ. I do remember a memorial Board that Hung in the Co-OP mess with names of KIA Advisors

      Ed 3/9 9th Reg 5th Div Sept 1964-Oct 1965

      • Thanks for the info Ed. It was probably a quite different place in those ‘early’ days. For those of us that spent considerable time there that compound at least made life more bearable. Compared to Lai Khe that compound was heaven.

      • I have a photo of Gosney Compound in 1966, when it was the home of Advisory Team 91 (says so on the sign over the entrance). Email me, and I’ll send it to you. Also have aerials of the compound and the 5th Div. base.

  11. I tried to post a reply last week and it took a couple of days before it showed up. That’s why two of my replies seem the same. I sent a second post after I never saw the first one show up. Maybe just a glitch.

  12. Mark, I arrived in Song Be in April 66 to join the 31BDQ. All those you mentioned were still there, although Jim Hughes, SA was soon medevaced to Japan with a serious infection from tripping on the stairs to our new hooch in the BDQ compound. He qas not back from Japan long before he derosed. Heard that he was then killed in a motorcycle accident. New SA was John Oliver (?). Ski (Cezarski) and I got our CIB’s on the same ambush patrol. VC mortar squad tripped the ambush as we were setting up in broad daylight. One VC KIA was a young boy, maybe 13 with a claymore strapped around his waist and the clicker in his pocket.
    Song Be was a good base. When I went back in 69 to the 2nd Brigade, 1st Cav our firebase was just outside town. I was the S5, so got to work with all the locals that I knew from my tome with 31BDQ.
    I can’t use the acronym, BDQ, where I live,(College Station, TX, home of Texas A&M). Here BDQ stands for “band queer”. Long story, but being a “band queer”, member of the Fightin’ Texas Aggie Band is a prestigious thing.

    • Is Zippo still on line ? There are lots of Team 70 folks wanting to hear what input and history he has to tell ( since he was the LAST guy out of country) but somehow he’s not getting responses……problem ? He contacted me via e- mail

      • I am here in Bangkok but have not seen the answers to questions I posted. Yet,one cannot expect 24 hour service and I am posting from overseas.

        Zippo

      • Last post i got (via email) was yesterday when he said “We are here Glen” in repsonse to Glen Kemp. however i haven’t heard anything since. nore can i find it scrolling through the website. :/

        /john

  13. From the time I came back from Vietnam through the end of the war I was always glued to the news searching for people I knew . I have often wondered what happened to the aide of the 5 th Division CG a young Lt. named Phuc(?) . He was a good troop and I liked him a great deal.

    • I also was glued to the TV in early ’72 since I was only back home for a couple of months. A CBS reporter named Richard Wagner did a broadcast from our area so I wrote him a letter. He answered back right away and said that things had gotten markedly worse in just a few months. In 1975 I was auditing the contractor that built Gosney Compound (PA & E). It was a sad day for all of us when Saigon fell. They had a lot of friends in Vietnam also having worked there for so many years.

  14. I was glued to the TV watching what was going on in our area (Binh Duong, etc.) in 1972 after I came home. There was a reporter for CBS named Richard Wagner that did a piece that I really wanted to know more about. I wrote him a letter and he wrote me back quite quickly to talk about how things had changed just since I left in ’71. I was always looking for news on the 5th ARVN or Lai Khe or An Loc or Phu Cuong, anything in our area. 1975 was heartbreaking.

  15. Zippo,
    I consider you comment high praise and am pleased to know that you think I performed well enough to deserve it.

  16. Gentleman let’s keep the criticism of this website down, read the guidelines. Don’t get this forum shut down by blasting the administrator as I’ve been enjoying it for years and look forward to continuing to connect with other Vets.

    • my apologies if what i said was ‘blasting the administrator’. i too enjoy this site. I just asked for clarification on the comment or that was my intent
      /john

  17. I agree with John and others . This site was established for vets of Vietnam to communicate with each other and I intend to continue to do just that . Zippo was one of the last in country and spent time as a POW and has more in country time and knowledge than most . I served with Zippo and am thankful that is still abound to communicate with the rest of us.

    • I was SA with the 4/9 and DEROS May 69. I am still trying to put the pieces together and particularly what happened after I left. These current comments are extremely helpful. Thanks for your remarks, please keep the conversation going.

  18. I went back because NVA LTG Tran Van Tra,who saved my life when I was captured, asked to walk the battlefield at Loc Ninh with me for Canadian Sixty Minutes. Like Hal Moore had done. I met with he and his aides and it seemed he had fallen into disfavor because as the head of veterans affairs he wanted to treat NVA, VC and ARVN the same. Anyway we spent about six hours in his garden and agreed to walk the battlefield together but when I returned to do it a couple months later his senior aide came to see me and said the general had been poisoned.

    They sent an impersonator for the shoot and then had my name on a picture of Sergeant W. ,Mick Dumond and Ed Carlson with their hands in the air at their museum. I told the female political officer to get my name off of it and started a tad of a ruckus. The next morning they came to the little hotel to arrest me at six and I told them to come back at eight and chased them into the street. The people smiled behind their hands and loved it.

    Anyway I spent six hours at the police station until Hanoi sent a colonel to apologize and send me back to Saigon. He was young and he asked where General Tra was and I told him Tra was dead. He cried. Here was an intelligence colonel and an American had to tell him their hero was dead.

    In the end the Canadian Sixty Minutes piece was not bad.

    Communists, what are you going to do with them?

    The people in general were just happy to see us again.

    Zip

      • given that email or web access is generally an individual, i once again fail to understand what your comment means. This conversation is relevant to all who served with team 70, as it’s the history of our time in vietnam. Zippo has more history for us, and i, for one, would like to hear it. there are quite a few here that would say the same. That he is discussing his time in vietnam and subsequent to his capture is quite important to all of us.

        suggesting that he is only speaking to one other person fails to take in the content of which he speaks.

        please explain why he should take this conversation to all of us, offline to an email venue.

        /john

      • Well I have been raining reality onto many preconceived parades for most of my life.

        We are former Team 70 MACV advisors speaking to those from the same team for the first time in over forty years. That I suppose is about as significant a purpose for any group to gather and discuss. Since I served in Vietnam at least a part of every year from 1965(December) to 12 February 1973 excuse me if my experiences at times seem to cross-fertilize. Team 70 was not my first MACV assignment and if someone brings up the 3rd Ranger Group which supported us at An Loc\Loc Ninh in 1972 that should be of interest to most of those assigned to our team at any time.

        Since nothing that happened to me in Vietnam bothers me I welcome any questions from anyone and excuse me if what time the chopper brought the mail was not one of the high points of my long service in our war. But Glenn Kemp thanks for making sure I got it.

        To quote Colonel Bill Miller; Do you get up in the morning just to pies people off?

        Zippo

    • During my visit last year I found everyone friendly and happy to see me. Of course most of the ordinary people are younger and have no memory of the war. As you say, the officials are a different animal all together. Let’s hope for a positive change over time and maybe in the long run, some of our effort will have not been lost. I agree with John and others who greatly enjoy your postings. We all experienced different things while we were there, some more intensely than others, but we all have our Team 70 experiences in common. Thanks.

  19. I would like to read your book also. Is it out yet? I just finished Dereliction of Duty by General McMaster that explains why we were all there. It covers ’63-’65 and all the lies and deceptions that Johnson and McNamara used. It’s an intense read, but for all of us that were there it explains a lot. Look forward to your book.

    • Been writing for years and got an advance and then publishing house violated the agreement by going by the due date because of their desire to have the last coup here included. My lawyer handled everything and I hope to finally have in again by end of year. Let a lawyer handle all dealing with publishers.

      It is titled ALONE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RIVER.

      • I look forward to it. Since I left RVN late in ’71 I have always wanted to hear more about what happened in ’72. it was all so fresh to me when I heard about An Loc, etc. just a few months later. Keep us all updated. It’s great to hear from someone that was actually there. I was glad I had a chance to go back to Lai Khe last year and see how it’s all changed, but of course the memories will always be there.

  20. Yep , Dave Patton , distant relative . Got relieved about mid tour but in my opinion he didn’t deserve it . He and I wrestled with a JP -4 fire one night during a sapper attack . Got canned because he told his counterpart what he was doing was wrong and I thoughtPatton was right.

    • That is the way I heard it and the Regiment DCO and the SGM,who I threatened to shoot dead for stealing my gasoline , thought they could do the same with LTC Schott and I.

      Colonel Bill Miller flew up and we all had lunch and Miller said to Colonel Vinh;

      ” Problem, Generals Minh and Hollingsworth love Captain Smith and if he said he would shoot your Sergeant Major he should be very afraid.”

      That was that.

      Few realize how few of us were left in Vietnam by late 1971 and early 72.

      Our counterparts felt they were being deserted and officers who had avoided Vietnam suddeny found they needed it on their record. You’d ask what some new officer’s last assignment was and be told, ‘ Harvard getting my MBA.’

      Even NCOS who had been in Vietnam for a long time were moving back to infantry assignments for promotion purposes. SFC Lull had been at the PRU training center at Long Hai as early as late 1968 before coming to 9th RCAT. I knew him well which led to him saying he did not recall. The RIF was on and suddenly fearful folks were vying for dwindling field assignments. Our club officer got his RIF notice at Laike. Getting that job was no career enhancer.

      Heck, Ed Carlson had been at Stanford before coming back to Vietnam but at least he had been there before.

      I started to think I was the only one there because he liked the operational end of things.

      Zip

      • My last assignment before Vietnam and Team 70 was as a civilian , I’d been off active duty for several years. I volunteered to come back on active duty and go to Vietnam because I wanted to know if I could measure up. I hope I did.

        • And measure up you certainly did. Now run out there and kick that smoking satchel charge off that blivet of av-gas.

          Zip

  21. Zip you are one of a rare breed and I always thought of you as Patton in an 0-3 uniform . Different war but the same mindset.

  22. I was proud to serve beside you as you were a true warrior . I was a professional back then but I don’t believe in all my years of service l ever met another soldier who had your grasp of combat. I am anxious to read your book .

    • What a kind thing to say. The thoughts of those beside you are far more important than anything a superior will ever utter.

  23. Knew some of that history but did not know about Lull ( I never thought he was very reliable ) . You of course know that what you did saved the entire South from folding up by holding up the whole offensive . I never understood why you were. It awarded the CMH for your actions

    • Never sue your President(my favorite President) over those still missing,like Lull et al. Recommendation had fourteen eye witness statements including four generals. I,of course,never saw it until a few years ago and a general in the Pentagon quietly sent me the entire packet. The book I am writing is a cause for concern among some but I have no sour grapes about the award. I leave that to others.

      Joined the army as a 17 year old high school dropout and retired as a major,I have never considered that a failure.

  24. Ken Wallingford lives somewhere near Austin and I think George is somewhere in Vermont . Bill Miller passed a few years ago but I’m in fairly good shape except for a bad back from that helicopter crash in Cambodia and falling down stairs and breaking an ankle ( sober even )…….happy to know others are doing well after 40 + years

    • Saw both of them at BG,USAF, Dave Baker’s funeral Arlington a couple years ago. Dave had been shot down as a FAC in summer 1972 over Snoul Cambodia. Our camp was in the jungle near Kratie(Kracheh). Ed Carlson retired as a Colonel and after buying his dream home on Puget Sound died. Dick Schott shot himself at Loc Ninh to try and let me get away and SFC Lull deserted with the Regiment S-3 just after we had a fight just south of the camp during E&E on 7 April. Only rumors about Lull but communist general Tran Van Tra told me they had Lull but he was afraid to go to jail with me. Official records have him dying ‘heroically’ south of the camp by Cam Vay bridge but the doctor they quote was captured and released with me.

      WANT TO HEAR WHAT WAR STORY A POW TOLD ON HIS RETURN?

      ATTEND HIS FUNERAL!

      ZIP

  25. Things have turned out well for both of us , seems you’re the right guy in the right part of the world with the right woman…..can’t get much better at our age ! Happy to know all is well and has ended well .Stay healthy and happy

    • As I used as my mantra in the POW camp, JUST HAPPY TO STILL BE HERE.

      Glenn Kemp has just showed up on here also and he worked at Laike. He drove all night to visit me for my annual physical in Pensacola a few years ago.

      We stacked them in the wire at Loc Ninh until we ran out of soldiers in April 1972.

      Colonel Vinh ran out the front gate in his underwear and surrendered but we fought on for a few hours after I shot his fellow officer trying to lower the flag.
      The soldiers fought and fought well for three days.

      T-54 tanks,whatcha gonna do but try to make em burn.

      George Wanat from district fought his butt off and E&Ed for 31 days before they got him.

      Great to be in contact.

  26. Yep, retired from Thai gig three years ago after 27 years.

    Still here, wife still looks good so I’ll stay awhile longer.

    • I left Team 70 in Jan ’71 so we probably didn’t meet. Do you remember who the G-2 was when you were there. I was in G-2, but I can’t remember his name. O’Connell or O’Donnell or something like that.

  27. Larry: Thanks for your response. I did another tour in RVN with MACJ J-3 in 70-71. When Saigon fell I was at the Command & General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS. We had a number of Vietnamese officers and some of the wives in our class. One was the XO of the 3/9th when I served with them. Most had family members in RVN and a number of them remained here in the states inasmuch as they had no where else to go.

    • Grant & Jay: Yes, they were lucky. Some of my current Vietnamese friends had to go through quite an ordeal (camps, etc.) to get out. Some have relatives that had to go through “re-education”. It’s encouraging to see the country moving forward now. Everyone was very friendly and helpful to me while I was there last year. A large portion of the population has no memory of the war so we are the ‘good guys’ now helping them against the Chinese. What a turn since ’70-71.

  28. I was in Song Be in ’66 as an advisor with the 31st Ranger Bn. Tm sgt was Beal, SA Jim Hughes, an RTO called “ski”. Anybody out there from ’66??

    • I was also with 31st BDQ in 1969 but was in 1st Infantry Division at Laike 1966-68. Got to 5th ARVN Division in October 1971. Loved my time with BDQ.

      Mark Smith

    • Lou, I think you were a 96-b and so was John Clarke so when I arrived we had 3 96-b’s in G-2. That’s kind of odd now that I think of it.

  29. Hi Richard,
    I was in Song Be a couple of years ago with my wife. I even stayed overnight. It was surreal. The locals were very friendly and fascinated by us. The town is now a small town, complete with shops, restarants and hotel(s). The runway is there main road with shops on both sides. I was able take new pictures and match them up with my dads. I was even able to locate the approximate crash site and lay flowers.
    It was a very emotional journey buy it brought me much closure.
    Regards,
    Robert Padron

    • I’m trying to find information on 1LT Richard Holzer, who died on 01AUG69 with Team 70. Anyone able to guide me?

      • 1LT Holzer was on an 8th Infantry team. I think 1/8. He and a sergeant were with a company that was ambushed. They hit the ground, and he rolled on his side to get his 1911 out of its holster and was hit by an AK round.

        I arrived about. then, and the job I’d been sent there for wasn’t open yet, so I was sent to replace him. LTC Price was SA. He was upset about LT Holzer’s death when I checked in. The sergeant who was with him told me the story some years later. Sorry, can’t remember his name.

        • I joined the 8th Bn about the second week of September as a 1Lt. They were still talking about Holzer but I had forgotten his name. Preparing for a trip last summer to the Wall in D.C, I checked the Wall of Valor and figured out that it was Richard Holzer’s position that I was entering. I took a picture of him name on the Wall — carry it with me on my phone. — Feel like he was a brother I never met. They told me following his death the order went out that all officer would carry M-16’s rather than just a holstered pistol. I still miss my M-16 today.

  30. Hi Richard,
    Thanks for the response.
    Sorry, I did receive your previuos response. I had forgotten your last name and thought it was a different Richard.
    The exact date of the crash was May 6, 1969 not “68.
    Thank you for your service.
    Robert

    • Roberto
      Your reply made me realize that my timeline and sequence of events, as I remember, is away off base. I am trying to now ‘re-establish the sequence of my events. I had to have worked with your father – I left for stateside 11 May 69.

      My timeline based on dated “letters home”.

      10 June 68 I was in Song Be area (Phu Qua – Phuc Bing) and 17 June 68 was in Song Be City with joint operations with your father’s BN for a period of time. My BM (I think 1/9) was essentially overrun and rotated to Chon Thon ( 9th Rev Hdq) 30 July 68. I remained in Song Be area (Phuc Bing) with 4/9 until March 69. I rotated with the 4/9 to Chon Thon and essentially remaining there until 11 May 69. I, specifically remember having a face to face conversation with the ASA in the trailing CH as I reiterated previously. I thought I had this conversation in Song Be; however, they may have been rotated to Chin Thon? My memory is still trying to reconstruct these events.

      Regards
      Richard

  31. Hello Richard,
    My father was Capt. I. F. Padron. He was at Song Be 68-69.
    He was killed in the Chinook crash at the ARVN runway in June 1969.
    Did you know him?
    Regards,
    Robery

    • Roberto,

      I replied to you in April 2016 (see previous messages), I got to Song Be about 1 month after that chopper went down. I was actually in Phouic Loc (by the airstrip and fuel storage area – Where as your father was stationed actually inside the town of Song Be – a couple of miles down the road. Note, I believe where the camp the 4/9 built is now a 18 hole golf course in the shadow of Nui Ba Ra. You can reach me directly Richardcg105@gmail.com.

      Regards

      Richard

      • Richard,
        Jerry Barrett here. Team 70 68-69. One of four man FDC team assigned from 1st Infantry Division. Other members were Maj. McGowan, SSG Statler and Pfc. Cluen. I believe I know you. Did you go to Hawaii for R&R? I met my wife and we saw you on the beach, I introduced you to her. Let me know about this reunion in Louisville.
        Thanks,
        Jerry

        • Jerry,
          I spent my R/R in Hong Kong – Dec 68. Initially, I was with the 1/9 in Song Be when it was essentially overrun 6/68. Then stayed in Song Be with the 4/9 thru 6/69. A Captain Cejka (prior tour with US 1Div) spent time with me in Song Be, then rotated to some assignment at the 5th Div TOC in Lam Son. I had actually zero contact with any individuals outside of Song Be (Sgt Bangi was on my team).

          My regiment Hdq was based in Chon Thon with a couple of Majors – their names escape me. I am still trying to replace my memory.

          I am strongly considering a road trip to Louisville from Pittsburgh, PA – if others will be going. E mail me direct.

          Richardcg105@gmail.com

        • jerry I was at ben cat all of 68, to enclude being overrun TET 68 but don’t remember your team at all, I was 1 of 3 men with artillery liason team from 2 bn 33rd arty sgtv68@aol.com

  32. Hi Chuck,

    All is well here in PA. Has been very cold and we are getting some sleet and freezing rain at the moment.

    Still unsure if I am going to get to the Louisville Reunion. Would sure like to.

    Good hearing from everyone who served with Team 70.

    Regards,

    Mike

  33. Hello Mike, Chuck LaMons here. Hope you are well and happy. Will you be going to Counterparts reunion in April. Beautiful day in Hickory, NC. About 8″ of snow crisp and bright today. Loving’ it. Call when you can 828-514-3657. Larry Eagan is going to the Counterparts reunion. Should be interesting with all branches represented. Chuck
    .

  34. That’s kinda the way Col Hayes’ command worked. Very personal, almost family like. You were either in or you were out. In was good and out was out. Col Hayes brought several guys with him from his previous command. They were a “band of brothers.” So it fits that he would pull the strings required to get Major Burke’s brother assigned to the team.

  35. Always wondered what happened to MAJ Burke, too. I was relatively new on the team and I was detailed to do the line-of-duty investigations on the deaths of LT Burke, SSG Montague, and LTC Couch. A very stark awakening for me as I got to the team mid-January and they all died in mid-February. That was very strange to me that the two Burke’s were assigned to the same team.

    • My daughter, Diana, is in Vietnam., as I write this. She wanted to see where her father, 1Lt Thomas Burke died. My sister in law is back in VN at this time, Bob Burke’s wife, but Diana wants to make sure she is in the right spot. She was 22 months old when he died and my other daughter was 3 months old. If you could email her it would be great.
      Thank you. Her email:
      Diana Burke dlburke2@gmail.com

  36. Yes I remember him being distinctly different. Well I hope boy went somewhere where he has lots of chickens and ducks to eat. 😀

  37. Jay,

    I don’t know what ever happened to Boy. I would guess that COL Kampe got rid of him as soon as he took command. Kampe was a tough SA.

    Mike McMunn

  38. Hi Jay,

    Mike McMunn here. Good to hear from you! It is certainly good to hear from so many of the old Team 70 crew. Bill and I have been here for a while and others have found the site. Great to reminisce about the old times and to know many of us are still around. Have not heard from Brooks or Munhall. Did have contact with Pete Privas, Engineer Advisor, a couple of years ago. Would like to hear from Don Rennie, Don Estes, Tom Ellison and others who were there in ’69, ’70.

    Mike McMunn

  39. My understanding was that Col Hayes owned that hotel. If you had a 5th ARVN patch you didn’t pay for anything. It then my memory is distorted probably.

  40. Jay,
    Friend request sent. Hope to see you in Louisville, KY at reunion in April. All we need to do now is locate Carl Brooks and find a six pack of “33”.

  41. At the Star hotel with Carl Brooks at least once. Have located you on Facebook but not sure if I have the right person. Tell me the first name of your wife as you list on Facebook.

  42. Wow miracles never cease. Amazing my feeble mind can remember that did you ever visit the Star Hill hotel in Saigon?

  43. Jay, I am in Arlington, TX. Had I known you were that close I would have looked you up. Had two more careers after retiring from army. Life is good. Check me out on Facebook.

  44. Jay, so good to hear from you. Where are you living and what are you doing these days? Have you heard from Carl Brooks? Hope you can make the reunion this year in Louisville.

    • Retired of course. Too darned old to work much. I trade the futures markets and play golf. When is the reunion and is there a site selected yet?

    • I see I didn’t answer all your questions. Currently live in Austin Texas. Haven’t ever heard anything about Brooks. I also worked with a Cpt Munhall in lai khe who I haven’t heard anything from. I pretty much lost track of everyone. Anyway, it’s nice to talk with you. I have to look up that reunion date etc.

    • Anyone know what happened to Major Burke? He was the G3 advisor in 69/70. He escorted his brothers body back to the states when he was killed. There was some problem when he came back to Lai khe as I recall. I left in July 1970 and never heard the outcome. Major Burke had a beautiful wife who was a professional singer. She sang at the rooftop restaurant/club at the old French hotel in Saigon. Seems like it was called the Contental or something.

      • Hi Jay, The old classic French hotel is the Continental right in the middle of downtown Saigon. It was elegant then and still is now after some extensive remodeling over the last 45 years. It’s a 4 star now.

  45. Larry,

    Glad you had a worthwhile trip. I would love to go back. The whole expansion of the Saigon metropolitan area must seem unreal as would Highway 13. I did a Google Earth search of the Lai Khe area a year or so ago and saw the roadway. Going south out of Lai Khe toward Ben Cat was always chancy. There was a wood line several hundred meters right in front of that turn as you slowed down and we were always told to be aware of snipers.

    Mike

  46. Yep , I remember Ben Cat as a place to avoid when traveling although after 45 years I don’t remember why except the idea was there were vc in there but I can picture the curve

    • The famous Iron Triangle was nearby and Ben Cat had a fierce reputation from before. It was that low cluster of huts in the distance. We never slowed down around there either. We all seem to have those same memories. It’s very different now and better for us Americans. It’s a young population now looking forward despite the current regime. That too will pass one of these days.

  47. WOW ! I drove hwy 13 more times than I can count up and down Lai Khe to Loc Ninh . Can’t imagine four lanes and lots of businesses. Back then it was simply village to village .

    • Hi Tom, It used to be so empty north of Phu Cuong and Ben Cat was off in the distance where the highway curves. Not any more. It’s quite a good road. Traffic in Saigon is bad at rush hour, but it’s all motor bikes and Toyota vans. No deuce and 1/2 trucks like the old days.

      Larry

  48. Hello Everyone, I just came back from a trip to Vietnam. Quite a change after 45 years. Saigon (the locals still call it that) is a huge metropolis of 10 million that extends all the way up past what we knew at Phu Cuong. Ben Cat is a big town that now goes way past Hwy 13 on the east. Hwy 13 is a 4 lane toll road that extends to the North past Lai Khe. The Lai Khe area has been extensively covered with plantations of a tall skinny tree that looks like they were planted 10 or 15 years ago. The roads are lined with homes and businesses. The Lai Khe of long ago is now just in my mind and my photo albums. It was a complete mental reset for me. Today’s Vietnam is a go, go, motor bike society with pretty girls taking selfies on their cell phones. It was a good trip and I plan on going back again sometime.

    Larry Gale G-2 1970

  49. Looking for any information and also a photo of SSGT Eddie Louis Smith-Team 70 kia 10/4/1964 as an advisor to an ARVN unit. His photo is needed for Education Center at Vietnam Veterans Memorial in DC and for National Archives Records Admin. Any background would also help.

  50. Loved your book Curtis. Have read it three times. My son is reading it now and likes it also. Best assignment I ever had was team 70.
    All the men were great and sorry that I did get to meet you. God bless you and all the men of MACV teams. They were all warriors in the true meaning of war.

    • William, Your thoughts echo mine exactly. There are many I may have met while I was in G-2 and never really knew the name at the time. Christmas of 1970 at Team 70 was quite a memory.

      Larry Gale

    • Thanks. Glad to hear you enjoyed it. Having Team 70 vets like it really makes me feel good. Always amazed how many people have read it since it’s been out of print since 1987 or so. My second novel set in Vietnam, Common Valor is on Amazon, hardbound, soft cover, Kindle.

  51. I did not work in the MARS station. I was assigned to G4 and worked with Captains West and Brooks. I have never heard from either of those men. I have made contact with Cpt Munn and exchanged information but he is the only one that I had contact with that I have heard from.

    • Was that Captain John West? I really liked him. Whenever I was at HQ I looked him up. We had many an intellectual discussion while sipping adult beverages. He was the driver in the infamous “Pizza Hut” run in “The Advisors.” Oh, wait, that was fiction. Or was it a war story? I left my (off the books) XM177E2 Colt Commando with him looking for an appreciative home.

    • Hi this is Jay West. I was in Landon and lai khe in 2969/70. I was surprised to see your post. Was just reminiscing and found it. Good to see some team 70 guys are still around.

  52. I think I have a couple of pictures of Sam, the rocket dog, around here somewhere. Glad you made it back OK. I think you guys were in the hootch next to ours by the road facing the village.

    Mike

  53. Hey Flash, how the hell are you? I’ve thought of you often and wondered what you were up to. Give me a shout and let me know.

    • Currently residing in PUERTO RICO BUT PLANNING TO MOVE BACK TO THE MAIN LAND. MAYBE ALBANY. SO DID YOU PEOPLE TOOK GOOD CARE OF SAM.
      HOW ARE YOU DOING AND WHERE YOU LIVE.
      HOPE YOU KEEP IN TOUCH. A LOT TO TALK ABOUT IT. I ‘MY ON FACEBOOK.

  54. I served 1969 to 1970. Part of 69 at LAMSON, WE MOVED TO LAI KHE TO REPLACE REPLACE THE BIG RED ONE .I WAS A SECURITY SQUAD LEADER. CALL, SERGEANT FLASH HAD DOG NAMED SAM. BEST BUDDY SERGEANT MORRIS. REMEMBER LEIB, SNIDER….

    • do you remember Mike Mcort or Paluch when we first came back 1/71, I stayed with them both in
      Chicago for a few days. I was rto @ Div. HQ in Lam Son, then Lai Khe, and finally with the 4/9.
      As I read these wonderful words of memory from all I am stunned at how really bad my memory is
      of those days of long ago. Maybe next year we could all do Wash. DC. Maybe we could nominate a
      secretary / treasurer to co-ordinate a place for us all to get together and share pictures and memories.
      Once we are gone that’s it !!! HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL AND my friend , John Dutton

      • Hello Robert, I certainly remember McCort. He was next to my space in our hooch. I went to Saigon a couple of time with Paluch. Lots of fun.
        A Happy New Year and Tet (Jan 28) to all the guys that served on Team 70 and in Vietnam generally.
        I met with another vet the other day that I served with on Team 91 the next year. It is so different talking to someone that was there and has common experiences. Lots of things come flooding back.

        Best Wishes to All,
        Larry Gale

  55. I am the same Tom Howes . Now retired and living in Austin. Never heard back from Zippo but have heard from Glen Taylor in the last month. Hope all is well . Ken Wallingford lives near Austin but I have lost track of others.

  56. Ed pike and Chuck Lamons

    Ed the first time I found this MACV site you were trying to find Bill Fessler. My name is Mike LaLonde and I served with you, Chuck and Bill during the time frame of June 66 until August 67.
    If my memory doesn’t fail me you were Colonel Walker’s typist and worked in his office.
    I visited Bill several times at his parents house shortly after we returned from Nam.
    In summer of 69 Bill, myself, Don Bennett
    And Irl Brooks all meet in Louisville for two days.
    I believe Irl has passed. Don is at last I knew still in Acworth Georgia.
    Hempstead ….was our postmaster in the end of the company office. I’m never sure these text messages arrive so answer if u can.
    Chuck in my time there I also served during Cedar Falls. By then I was out of field duty but RTO at headquarters when Norman Plante was KIA. I took his place as RTO for 5th ARVN Recon. Can’t remember the captain’s name but he was Asian. Norm sure loved those Vietnamese in recon.

  57. I am interested in locating Oliver H. Crittenden, a former I Troop 2d ACR officer in Amberg Germany. I ran across his name in a set of orders awarding him a CIB in October 1967. Crittenden was one of the good Lieutenant’s in Amberg.

  58. Mrs. Taylor, one other thing ….without your husband I probably would never have made it home , no one else was going to come and get me .

  59. I am and your husband is the person who came in with the king bees and pulled us out of Cambodia . He was always calm and if I recall as I jumped on the helicopter and asked why it took so long to get us ( it probably didn’t ) he laughed and said that traffic was bad…..it broke the tension . Hope all is well .

  60. OMG I can hardly believe I heard from you. I have thought about you often over the years, I moved to Naples in 1999 and somehow I knew you lived here in Naples. I moved to Denver after I got out of the Army in 1970, managed a Chevrolet Dealership for 30 years, retired in 1999 and moved to Naples. My email addess is craigrmcgee@hotmail.com, my phone number is 239-896-8359. I just moved into a brand new house along I-75 in Estero, a new development called Tidewater by Del Webb. By all means contact me when you get to Florida would love to see you, I’ll buy lunch or dinner.

  61. Hello Craig McGee Dick Clark here. I am retired in Dallas Texas. Good to hear from you. It was surely a bad day when we lost Bob Boyd. I am glad you got your well deserved Bronze Star. I spent several years in Naples. We lived in WindStar. I plan to be down in Florida early next year. Please send me your contact information so we can get together. Richard W. Clark, Jr. 7012 Leameadow Drive, Dallas, TX 75248 214 226 7388.

  62. Craig, If you look back in the archives I think you name came up from some colleagues. Check it out if you haven’t done it already.
    I still think you should tell the story of your Zippo.
    Mike

  63. Craig,
    Do you remember a few years ago when I helped to reunite you with your Vietnam lighter? Maybe you want to share that story.

    Glad you are here.

    Mike

  64. Hello Karen Stith, Are you still using the same email that Larry was using? I would like to send you a picture in case you haven’t seen it. Larry and I spent quite a bit of time together on Team 70.

    Larry Gale Team 70 Jan-Dec 1970.

  65. My husband Larry Stith was on Advisory team 70 from 1970 – 71. Anyone who has any memories of him it would be greatly appreciated as he recently passed away. Does anyone remember Vinnie DePaulo ( not sure about the spelling ). Thank you.

    • Hi Karen. This is Vinny DePaola. Just found this site yesterday. So Sorry to hear about Larry’s passing. We spent some good times together during my short time in country (Sept. ’70 to Feb. ’71). Wish I had discovered the site sooner so we could have reconnected. I also sent you an email at Lwstith but not sure you’re still using that email address. Hope you are well.

      Vinny

  66. Ken, our paths must’ve crossed. I was at the team HQ, Sr. Advisor’s Office, Sept. 1962-Sept. 1963, first when it was known then as BIF Compound after the Bureau of Industrial Forestry which owned the property during the French colonial days, and later after it was dedicated to Lt. Train. When I first found this site I wondered why nobody from my time with the team was showing up and then it struck me, I was the youngest MAAG guy on the team at the time, 22, and all the NCOs and officers were veterans of Korea and WWII, so these days they’d all be in their 80s or long gone from this world. In my day Coal Bin Willie (AKA Col. Wilson) was Sr. Adv. to III Corps. I knew his SGT. Maj. who told me Col. Wilson advised an officer going home on emergency leave to attend to a sick wife, “Major, if the army wanted you to have a wife it would have issued you one.”

    • Dan, I don’t remember you, but that’s not to say we didn’t see each other as I was the enlisted Psywar/Civic Action Advisor and My boss was Captain Bodine. We too were At the 5th Div Hqs just across the street from the Sr. Advisors office. I left in Early December. I was there when President Kennedy was assinated and when the Vietnames President Diem and his brother was overthrown. When I left I came back and went to flight school at Fort Walters Tex. I did not finishe flight school and assigned to Then CONARC, DCSIntell, Operations Division. I was promoted to Staff Sgt and later to SFC and in 1966 I went to OCS and was commissioned a 2d Lt. I went back to the same office at CONARC and was the G-2 Air Officer from March to Dec of 1967 and was then assigned to Germany until 1969 when I was assigned to Vietnam where I assigned as a Company Commander of the 446 Med Truck Co in Quang Tri and later moved that Company down to Long Binh to the 48th Trans Gp, 6th Trans Bn and after six months I was transferred over to the 48th Gp proper and took command of the 261st Lt Trk Company directly under the 48th. After my year in Vienam as a commander I came home to attend the Transportation Career Course and then taught Convoy Operations and Convoy Counter ambush operations for a year and in 1972 I returned to Vietnam and to MACV where I served as a Sr Adv to the 306th Floating Caft Maintenance Group (they provided maintenance and overhaul to the entire south vietnams Army flotilla). I did that for six months and by then the US had moved out of Long Binh and the Vietnamese military was moving and I was assigned as Sr Adv to the ARVN 5th Transportation Group. I was transferred to Fort Buchanan Puerto Rico where I served as a Advisor to the US Army Reserves there and then moved over to the post proper and served as Director of Maintenance and later as Director of Transportation and when that position was civilianized I took command of the Garrison Hq & Hq Company until I returned to Fort Eustis and the Transportation School in 1976. I served there as a Team Leader in the Educational Development program until I retired in 1978.
      Hope to hear from you soon. I’m sorry I took so long to respond .

  67. Hello Ken,
    I don’t think we are related to the medic you are referring to. But, I will check with my family.
    My dad’s brother (my uncle) was also in Vietnam but he was an officer and I think he did his first tour in ’64-65.
    Thank you for your service.
    Robert

  68. I am a high school class mate of Capt.Samuel R. Stewart III who was killed in Binh Duong Province on Feb 11, 1968. He was with Advisory Team 70, 5th Infantry Division and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross posthumously. He was from Miami, Fl but I cannot find his burial place. The info provided on one page said he was interred at Miami Memorial Park but there’s no record of him there. I have visited several other cemeteries in Miami but am unable to locate his grave site. I also have not found a military picture of him. I have pictures of Sammy from our high school. Can anyone give me advise how I might find his grave site or locate pictures of him in service? I maybe reached at altownsel@altownselinc.com Thank You.

    • Hello Alphonso,My father was also in Team 70. He died in 1969 and is also buried at Miami Memorial Park.I have heen to Miami Memorial Park many times over the last 48 years. I do not remember ever seeing the gravesite of Capt. Stewart.I will double check at their office next time I am there.Good luck in your search.Roberto Padron

      Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device

      • Roberto I was in Adv Tm 70 in 1963 I was a SP5 and there was a Specialist Padron on the Team with us and he was a Medic. We were both at the Team Headquarters in Bien Hoa. Is there any chance he was related to your family?

        Ken Strickland
        Maj US Army Ret
        klams1@cox.net

      • Thank you for your response. You are correct Capt. Stewart was not buried at Miami Memorial Park and I confirmed this with Miami Memorial. I have recent information as to his burial place and can soon confirm. Again thank you for you response.

    • I was there that night when Sammy got killed , it was feb 1st 1968 about 4 am or so. I was with the artillery liaison. It was TET and we were overran , I still shake my head how I survived it .Sgt Gregory Gray was also killed and 3 others wounded. A us tank save my life by a mere second .sgtv68@aol.com

  69. I received the following information from Larry Stith’s wife Karen regarding the funeral :

    Hi Lou- i know you won’t be able to come, but the service for Larry will be on Friday, July 15th from 5-8pm at Dobies Funeral Home in Hudson. He will be buried at the Florida National Cemetary ar Bushnell on Monday at 1pm.

    The funeral home has a website with the obituary.
    Lou

  70. Hello Jesus,
    My father was Capt. Irenardo Felix Padron, US Army Senior Advisor Team 70, 3 Bn. 9 Regt, 5 ARVN Div. He died on a CH-47A Chinook that crashed at Phouc long, Song Be on 6 May, 1969.
    He was born on 30 April, 1931 in Matanzas, Cuba. He was an officer in the Cuban Army prior to joining the US Army. He fled Cuba on 19, April, 1959 after the communist takeover.
    He returned to Cuba as a 2nd Lt. in the 17, April, 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion. His ship the HOUSTON was sunk during the invasion but he still managed to join the fight. He was one of only a few to elude capture in the swamps and make it to the Colombian Embassy in Havana.
    He did two (2) tours of Vietnam, ’66-67 and ’68-69
    He received the: Combat Infantryman Badge, Bronze Star (Posthumously), Army Commendation Medal, Air Medal, National Defense Medal, RVN Campaign Medal and Vietnam Service Medal (My father never spoke of his experiences or awards, but I do.)
    BTW: My father was good friends with another Cuban-American soldier, Cpt. Felix Sosa-Camejo who died on 12 February, 1968 defending the MACV compound in Hue during the Tet Offensive. Our families are still very close.
    God bless America and good luck on your book.
    Robert Padron

    • I wonder if your father was a Captain leading 2 companies of Mike Force in Binh Long province in 1967? I met a captain of Cuban descent who had been in the Bay of Pigs mess. I thought his name was Pina`. They provided security around our air strip during a high threat time and also were inserted in the jungle to find a NVA hospital which turned out to be a regiment. I FACed the extraction and all but 3 were wounded or dead but all were extractred.

  71. Henry R. Garcia is my dad , he was kia 12-10-67 , he was from Rockport Texas, he was a ssgt and was a MACV Advisor with the 70 advisory team ,

  72. Hello Lou, I am really sorry to hear about Larry Stith. We had just started corresponding since he found this web site. I have a terrific picture of him working at his desk at Lai Khe. Condolences and best wishes to his family from all of us that knew him and worked with him during that sometimes dangerous time.

    Larry Gale

  73. It is with a heavy heart that will tell you that my friend and our brother Larry Stith, Team 70, 1970, has died. He past away 7/8/2016 at 8:00 pm from a heart attack. Funeral arrangements will follow. He will be sorely missed by all who knew him.

    • I share your heavy heart and do mourn for a comrade in arms of all of us at Team 70 5th ARVN Infantry Division.
      my condolences to his family. Robert Bell

    • Larry and I were talking in his hooch when a rocket hit close to the 1st Sgt’s hooch nearby. We both hit the floor very quickly. Some shrapnel actually went through my hootch so I might have been at the right place at the right time. When we communicated a few months ago we both remembered that day. Later we were both in Saigon to leave for R&R’s so we decided to go over to a nice French restaurant in the Caravelle Hotel and have a good lobster dinner. We both really enjoyed it. Those are the type of things you always remember. Larry was a good friend and a terrific guy and will really be missed. I hope his family is aware of this website.

  74. Hello,
    I was wondering if anyone served with my father Sgt Steven Zeller, he was an RTO with the 9th regional combat assistance team, advisory team 70 5th division combat assistance team. He was for sure there august 1970 to October 1970 but probably longer. anyone with some information can contact me directly. Thanks

    • Do you mean 9th “Regimental” assistance team and not 9th “regional” combat team, because I was an RTO at the
      9th Regimental combat team for a large part of the latter part of 1970. The last name of Zeller sounds familiar.
      If he is the man I am thinking of, him and I swapped RTO assignments from An Loc and he came in to Lai Khe
      Division Headquaters ..

      • Hi Bob,
        thanks for the reply it gives me a place to start anyway. I’m having problems tracking down anything related to my father’s time in Vietnam, he was like a ghost. I’m starting to wonder what exactly he did since there seems to be no record of him, or maybe I’m just looking in the wrong place. when you swapped assignments do you think he stayed at Lai Khe or just get another assignment?

  75. Ken Strickland here, I was a SP5 in 1963 assigned to Team 70 as asst Psywar Civic Action advisor located in Bien Hoa (Train Compound). Later I received a commission and returned to Vietnam as a Captain in Command of a truck Company assigned to the 48th Trans Gp in 1969/70 and once again in 1972/73 as a Senior Advisor to the Vietnamese 306 Floating Craft Maintenance Group at Tu Duc for six months and then when all the Americans moved out of Long Binh I was sent oveer to be the Senior Advisor to the Vietnamese 5th Transportation Command. I remember some exciting experiences while a member of Team 70, But age and memory has caused me to forget the names of most of my friends and acquaintences from 1963. May God bless all of you who served.

    Ken Strickland, Major, USA Retired. klams1@cox.net

    • Ken, hope you are well. Just scanning the Team 70 site this morning & re-read your posts. Boy, talk about “age and memory” fogging our minds! Are you in Virginia? I moved in with my son and his family in Prince George’s County, MD after my wife died. Should get together for a lunch one day. Yes, I can still eat, age hasn’t taken that from me!

  76. I did not work at the MARS station. I was the advisor to the 5th logistical BN. I left in December of 1970 and have since connected with Mike McMunn. Hope to make it in November but not sure at this time. Team 70 was the best assignment that I had in my 21 year military career and I was glad to have been part of the team.

    • Hello Bill – You and I left the team just about the same time. Did you ever come into the G-2 office at Lai Khe for maps or to register a war trophy? We might have met. I remembered your name from somewhere and then I saw that you and I were on the same awards order dated 5 December 1970. Did you move on to another assignment or finally done with the Army? I still had a year to go and moved further south back to Lam Son.

      Larry Gale

      • Larry,
        I did ship a war trophy home and that must have been when I met you. I would remain in the army for another 8 years and I retired in 1978 with 21 years active military service. I have always considered my time with team 70 as the best assignment I ever had. I hope to attend the reunion but not sure at this point. The team members always worked well together and I considered the people in team 70 to be some of the best I have ever served with. Please stay in touch and we may get to meet at the reunion.

        Bill Staton

  77. Hi Zippo, It’s great to have you on this site. I’d like to hear more about the battle around An Loc and your captivity. How long did it last? I was just back in the US in early ’72 from my time at Team 70 and 91 and was watching with great interest and was encouraged at the time as the attack finally failed.

    Larry Gale

    • This is to Larry Gale and Zippo / my name is Sp4 Robert Bell I served with the 9th for about 8 or 9
      months in 1970 at Chon Than, An Loc, FSB/hill 368, Loc Ninh, Bo Duc & Bo Dup and went on
      field ops with a company from 4/9. Do either of you know me or remember a Major from 4/9 or a capt
      from 1970, names are starting to fail me. I really hope we can pull off a reunion in Nov. For everyone
      reading this I had a reunion in New Jersey with one man and we asked a local VFW if we could use their facility
      and they let us.

      • To Bob Bell, I left the 4/9 in Chon Than June 69. A captain replaced me as senior advisor and a Lt who jumped of the chopper that flew me out to Lam Son on my way state side. I can’t remember the Cpt’s name and never did know the Lt. By chance do you know their names and if they made it out?

        Thanks
        Richard Gotch

  78. I was advisor to 3rd Bn 7th Regt
    1968 – 1969. Also was in TOC at Lam Son (Phu Loi) A reunion would be good.
    Can do

      • I too worked in the TOC at Lam Son. I was with the 1st div. (Big Red One) on assignment to clear artillery targets through my ARVN counterparts.

        • Tom,
          I was also Big Red One assigned to team 70 from Feb 68 to 69. My other 1st Infantry team members were Maj. McGowan, SSG Statler and Pfc Cluen. I was Sp4 Jerry Barrett. I saw Maj. McGowan once at Ft. Sill in 1970, but had no contact with anyone from Tm 70 until I found this site in late 2015. They are planning a reunion in DC in November. I hope plans for this is posted on line. I was wondering if you were my replacement after I left in Feb 1969 and also if you remember my team member brothers? Any info on them? I would surely love to see and talk with them. I will be 70 yrs old in November and feel like I am living on borrowed time. I live in Georgia. Want to talk (404) 404-4373. Email: jmbarrett1946@gmail.com Good luck and peace to all Team 70 brothers who served in Vietnam. Hope to meet new and old friends in November.

          Jerry

    • Jim,
      SP4 Jerry Barrett here, I was also in the TOC at Lam Son from 68-69. I was part of a 4 man team(FDC) from 1st Infantry Div.( Big Red One) attached to Tm 70. The other members were CPT. McGowan, SSG Statler and PFC Cluen. Did you know any of these guys? I have lost contact since leaving Nam. It would me great to be able to talk with them. Good to see you on this site. Have a great Christmas and New Year.
      Jerry Barrett

  79. The basic purpose of the site is for Team Vets to find each other. Many of the follow ups with former colleagues are done off the site and directly between individuals.In the tab Website Guidelines on the site home page is a recommendation to coordinate any reunion details directly among participants and not through the site. This keeps the site free of any references to commercial activities including airlines, hotels and travel agencies.

  80. Count me in also. I may be of some help setting it up since my children live in the D.C. area. I live in the Pittsburgh, PA area. Note that time period in D.C. is crowded with vets, but there’s always room for a few more.

    Richard Gotch

    • Dudbridge any chance we crossed paths at Gosney? I remember an individual who had a bronze star with either one or two oak leaf clusters. My name is La Londe I was an RTO for the 2nd of the 7th and 8 think we may have shared a brief period in the RTO hootch.

  81. Advisory Team 70 Veterans,

    Just found this website and felt compelled to send a note. My father, Robert Lott, was assigned to the Team from Jul 69 to Jul 70, first with the 7th Regiment and then later with the 5th Division HQs. After I found this website, I read off some of the comments to him. He initially worked for COL Hayes and remembers him well, he laughed at the snake and duck story. He remembered the another story about the snake getting out one night and loose in the area…..that got him really laughing.

    I am wondering if anyone may have any memories of a fire fight in the Fall of 1969 between 1st and 4th Battalions, 7th Infantry Regiment, and C Co, 2nd Battalion, “Quyet Tang – Resolve to Win” Regiment, Viet Cong vicinity of Phu Hoa Dong. Wondering if anyone remembers the dates or has any pictures to share.

    “I now know why men who have been to war yearn to reunite. Not to tell stories or look at old pictures. Not to laugh or weep. Comrades gather because they long to be with the men who once acted at their best; men who suffered and sacrificed, who were stripped of their humanity. I did not pick these men. They were delivered by fate and the military. But I know them in a way I know no other men. I have never given anyone such trust. They were willing to guard something more precious than my life. They would have carried my reputation, the memory of me for the rest of their lives. It was part of the bargain we all made, the reason we were so willing to die for one another. As long as I have memory, I will think of them all, every day. I am sure that when I leave this world, my last thought will be of my family and my comrades… Such good men.” –Author Unknown—

    Good Luck and God Speed

    Bob Lott Jr.

    • Bob,

      I remember your father very well. He became Deputy Senior Advisor after LTC Couch was killed. He then managed our move from Lam Son to Lai Khe. Not many like him. Pass on my regards.

      I did not get to the team until January 70 so I do not recall that firefight.

      Regards,

      Mike McMunn

    • I was an enlisted man / RTO, and if my memory serves me well / call signs got
      used incorrectly and the chopper pilots identified an inbound General as a 4 star /
      Hayes not being available @ Lai Khe, Lt. Col. Lott was dispatched to greet the 4 star general—
      At the chopper Lt. Col. Lott was only greeted by another Lt. Col. the pilots accepted
      responsibility for the mistake. I believe he was friends with Capt Parlow, I had contact with him
      about 6 years ago. He lives in Minnesota and when I find his address I am going to tell him about this
      website. I liked your post about your feelings of those you served with. I also think of Viet Nam every day
      of my life.
      The days, weeks, and the months are ticking by—for all reading this, where are we going to meet?

      • Thanks both Mike and Bob. I really appreciate the anecdotes. It seems, a generation or two later, those kinds of funny things still happen in the Army and I guess always will. I wouldn’t trade my own experiences or hearing stories of my father from both Korea and Vietnam for any amount of money.

        • Bob,

          A couple of other anecdotes: as I mentioned above, Colonel Lott was largely in charge of the move into Lai Khe. We took over about a 2 square block area within the ARVN perimeter, an area previously inhabited by units of the 1st Infantry Div. In the early days, we would spend half of our days performing advisory duties and the rest of the day improving the advisor compound by erecting B-40 wire, filling sandbags for machinegun emplacements, and painting sun-dried wood that soaked up paint like a sponge.

          One of the buildings had been an EM or NCO club if I remember but Col. Lott wanted to make it into the compound chapel and, of course a chapel must be white. We painted that building everyday for a week before it even gave an appearance of looking white. We must have gone through 50 gallons of paint. In the end I remember him saying that the paint job looked like hell but that the cross at the top sure looked great!

          Another story if I may: one night I was the compound duty officer. At about 2300 hrs there was an explosion on or very close to the compound. Per SOP my orders were: 1) to report to the TOC we were taking incoming and 2) to get the DSA on the field phone and inform him of what was going on. I rang and rang the field phone to his hootch with no answer. At that point I was worried he had been injured by the explosion or if he had been fragged. I sent a runner to his hootch and then we learned he was playing cards in someone else’s hootch and he was fine.

          It turned out a drunk soldier from a Signal unit housed on the compound pulled the pin on a grenade and tossed it near one of the guard posts. Fortunately, no one was harmed but it made for an interesting night.

          • Thanks Mike…..passed on the stories and my Dad remembers the signal platoon well. Thanks for the post.

            And for anyone who may know – back the the question on the engagement some time in the Fall of 69….hoping someone may know the dates, mostly because my Dad can’t recall and its bugging him (as a result, me). I’m understanding it was a two day fight, 1/7 made initial contact in daylight and was reinforced by 4/7 as nightfall approached. As 4/7 was moving to engage and make contact in the darkness, there were apparently more than several instances of fratricide between the 2 Battalions. Daybreak brought CAS and helicopter gunships which broke up the enemy. All the details I know, other than my father said ARVN soldiers fought bravely in the engagement and through the night….many times standing in the waist to chest deep rice paddies to return fire.

            …….Thank you MACV Teams.

    • Hey bob I was with Col Hayes and your dad at Lamson and lai khe. I was present when “boy” the constrictor got loose from the cage during a poker game one night at Lamson. He was Col Hayes’ “equalizer”. When boy was loose the other players were decidedly nervous and their focus was shattered. Col Hayes made up hid losses while Boy slithered around the room. Those Thursday night poker games were legendary. There was a navy Lt. jg who cleaned the Col’s out a few times. One of the players who would fly in for the game was s Ltc named Beckwith. Google him. You will orobably be impressed.

      I think my assignment to advisory team 70 was one of the highlights of my career. I remember Ltc Lott well. He was one of the good guys.

      All the best to you. Jay

  82. Hello Richard,
    My father was Capt. I. F. Padron. S.A. for the 3 Bn, 9 Rgmt, 5 Div. He died on the CH47 that crashed at Song Be on 6 May 1969. I would appreciate any information you may have regarding my father and/or the crash. My email is rpadron99@aol.com.
    Thank you for your service.
    Regards,
    Robert Padron

    • Robert
      I never met your father. I did meet and at times worked with his replacement, as well as his actual team members (actual names still escape me). I do remember that he was held in high regard especially for his prior military exploits.

      I was not there during the actual downing of that CH. However, having participated in numerous flights in and out of Song Be subject to hostile sniper fire, it is my belief that a sniper on Nui Ba Ra got lucky with a small arms round to the tail rotor. Those chopper pilots were highly skilled at knowing exactly what their aircraft was capable of handling.

      Give me some more time to refresh my memory. We’ll talk more.

      Best of luck
      Richard Gotch

      • I was in and out of Song Be once a month on the pay chopper. We flew in shortly after it was overrun in 1969 (don’t remember the month). I believe we had two advisors killed. One was a boy I knew as we came into country together. In 1969 Charlie was using SAM 57’s in that area. We had to take evasive action as they locked onto our chopper. According to the pilot, we were lucky to evade the rocket. I didn’t know up till then the manuevers a Huey was capable of. We were under mortar attack that day while on the ground.

  83. I just found this web site. I, LT Richard Gotch (captains never seemed to last long) was senior advisor with the 4/9, 5th Div May 68 – May 69 with most of time at Song Be, although the 4/9 rotated through Ann Loc and Chan Thon. I don’t remember names of the guys I served with at the moment. I do remember the CH 47 going down as 4/9’s base was near the air strip and having a discussion with the assistant senior advisor who was in the trailing CH 47.

    My memory of those years should return and would like to hear from anyone, I have several hundred slides stored somewhere in my house and will share them.

    Richardcg105@gmail.com

  84. All….I’m just now finding this site while trying to research a specific engagement in the Fall of 1969, and really glad to see the comments from the veterans. My father was with Advisory Team 70 from July 1969 – July 1970. I’m still very lucky to have him with us and proud of his service in Korea and Vietnam. We showed him some of the comments left by you guys last night and on the comment about COL Hayes’ 9′ boa eating ducks, he laughed and said that was nothing compared to the time the snake got loose and everyone was trying to catch it.

    I am interested to know if anyone remembers or has any specific information on a brief engagement in the Fall of 1969 between 1st and 4th Battalions, 7th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division (ARVN) and C Company, 2nd Battalion, “Quyet Tang – Resolve to Win” Regiment, Viet Cong, vicinity of Phu Hoa Dong, South Vietnam.

    “I now know why men who have been to war yearn to reunite. Not to tell stories or look at old pictures. Not to laugh or weep. Comrades gather because they long to be with the men who once acted at their best; men who suffered and sacrificed, who were stripped of their humanity. I did not pick these men. They were delivered by fate and the military. But I know them in a way I know no other men. I have never given anyone such trust. They were willing to guard something more precious than my life. They would have carried my reputation, the memory of me for the rest of their lives. It was part of the bargain we all made, the reason we were so willing to die for one another. As long as I have memory, I will think of them all, every day. I am sure that when I leave this world, my last thought will be of my family and my comrades… Such good men.” –Author Unknown—

  85. Hi John, Yes, I had a huge memory flood especially reading certain parts. I also am thankful for my place in the organization, but then we all had our part to play. It was truly an interesting book because many parts were real.

    Larry

  86. Great idea. I am not much into the organizing. I am a good follower now that I am I’m later years. I do have a good friend, VN era vet, who lives in Manassas, worked in DC many years. He may have some info. Maybe the current occupants of the White House would put us up? (Joke). I love DC, great place. To everyone who reads this I hope God has blessed your lives.
    I was with 4/7, PTQ, and points west 6/66 to 3/68. Worked TOC, Rto at Lam Son, (Phu Loi) for sometime. Oh those were the days. If my math is right that was 50 years ago when I left the Nam, back to the world. Wow 50 years. Hello to Mike LaLonde and Larry Eagan if you are reading.

    • Chuck,

      Thanks for stepping forward and be willing to contact your friend for help.

      May I SUGGEST, for planning purposes, hotel arrangements for the night of 11/10 and check out on 11/12. That gives us a half-day/night to meet and organize on the ground, the 11th for the Wall visit and ceremony, the evening of the 11th to get over to Eden Center in Falls Church, and some more time to shoot the bull and tell war stories.

      I welcome all to help setting the agenda and time table but at least this proposal might give Chuck’s friend some idea of what we are up to.

      Obviously, I am just throwing this out to get the conversation started. The other thing is to start getting some idea of how many may attend. With enough preparation we can get the word out through this site, VFW magazine, AL magazine, DAV magazine, etc.

      • Hello,
        As I have mentioned on previous post, my father was with Team 70 during ’68/’69. I would be honored to attend.
        Thank you for your service.

      • Hello Larry, glad to hear you had a good trip. I am hoping to hook up in Nov in DC. Would be very cool. How are you doing? Well I hope. Was nice to meet you and your wife on your trip south. See you, Chuck-
        (Sampson Scooper 4), over, the only call sign I can remember that we used.

    • Chuck, sorry for not checking in sooner. Things are great no complaints at this point. Was there a meeting in San Diego? Chuck I saw your picture on Facebook. I’m lousy with all the electronics but I enjoyed seeing your picture.
      If there is a reunion we should all bring pictures.

      • Hello Mike, no problem, good to see your post. I can not make it to San Diego. I presume it is still on for 28 &29 April. Larry Eagon must have posted the picture. I may have if it was on Facebook. Can’t remember. Nov would be terrific for s reunion. Glad to hear you are doing well. Same here, very blessed. Hope to see you before the days slip away. Take care. Chuck

      • Hello Larry, glad to hear you had a good trip. I am hoping to hook up in Nov in DC. Would be very cool. How are you doing? Well I hope. Was nice to meet you and your wife on your trip south. See you, Chuck-
        (Sampson Scooper 4), over, the only call sign I can remember that we used.

  87. Bob,

    I think your suggestion about anyone who is familiar with facilities in the DC, Arlington, Alexandria area might be able to make some contacts and see what might be available. It would be nice if we could get a general idea of how many folks might be interested. I know Tom Boyle and myself are interested.

    Mike

  88. Tom,
    I came into the team in June, 68. No problem with remembering me. When you’re new you learn everyone’s name but the old timers don’t learn the new guys.names. I was the same way, I remember you, Lou and the others who were in the hooch when I arrived but I can’t remember who took your places. I’ve also read Fred Marshall’s report in the Texas Tech Oral History Project. He has a picture of you and Lou in his archive.If you haven’t read it, you should. I’ve been thinking of doing the history and giving the perspective of someone who was in base camp the whole time.

    I worked in the admin office first as a typist and later ran the message center. Basically, I was a messenger who delivered classified documents (intsum & stireps (?) and arc light strikes) to the other offices. I visited each office twice a day so I got to know most everyone at Gosney Compound.

    I remember that after the swimming pool was built I almost drowned you horsing around in the pool. You had some lung problem. I thought I had let you breath but you hadn’t gotten enough air and I held you under too long. Scared the hell out of me.

    Sam

    • Hi All, By Jan 71 the plastic liner in the swimming pool had become infected with some kind of bacteria. Several people got bad rashes so the whole thing was closed down and the liner was taken out. It sat empty for awhile until some of the engineering guys assigned to Team 91 scrounged rebar and cement and built a really first class pool. Everyone on the team helped out when they were pouring and finishing the concrete. It sure was nice on some of those hot days.

      Larry

    • Sam…Jun/68 really and lived in our hooch…I know I was out of touch sometimes but you would think I’d remember a fellow soldier in the same hooch for 4 months!! I didn’t know a lot of the 80 or so guys at Gosney. Too much guard duty and too many drinks at the EM Club. Thanks for remembering me, I didn’t think anyone remembered me outside the G2 guys. I was promoted to E5 in August and was allowed in the NCO Club but rarely went in as my friends were E4 and below and we had more fun. Glad you made it back OK as ADV TM 70 had a 28% loss rate throughout the 5th ARVN AOR.

    • My name is Greg Skalany. I was stationed at Lam Son mid 69 until April 70 as an E-3 in the Air Force, with the forward air controllers. Beside doing generator repair on the compound and two other sites, I was tasked with keeping the pool area clean. (I remember painting the surrounding fence.) I also ran the special services photo lab at night, and processed mission photos from our pilots. I don’t remember many of the people stationed there, but remember all the different branches represented. When I left, I received a plaque from my outfit for winning “the Battle of the Pool”.

  89. My name is Robert Bell / I served (proudly) with team70 from 11/69 at Lam son and about 2
    months later at Lai Khe and the 9th Reg until 1/71. I went back to Lai Khe in 2000. The first thing I do every morning
    is check this sight for new postings. We all carried on a proud tradition of serving in the
    United States Military. This will be one of only a few opportunities we all have left to get
    together. One of this group should be able to get a place we could all meet on
    Veterans Day Nov. 2016. I thank all of you for making my tour a Honored tradition and
    a memory I think of every day.

  90. Team 70,

    If we are serious about a reunion on November 11, 2106 I am definitely in. What do we want to do? A get-together at a DC pub, visit the Wall as a group, dinner at a great restaurant at Eden Center in Falls Church, or all of the above? I am in favor of ‘all of the above.’

    Mike

    • We need a thinker like you to organize give the orders and the
      troops will follow. When I was younger and more healthy I would have
      gladly put it together but I cannot do it now. Everyone else reading this
      think about it, maybe someone knows of a hotel that will sponsor us
      a meeting room or a hall where we can gather and meet

  91. Tom,

    I was there later (Jan 70 – Jan 71) but saw you mention Tom Boyle. Tom is a very good friend of mine and I have been trying to get him to post here. Maybe this will get him out of the weeds. We live in the same general community and he, his wife and I got together last Thursday evening.

    If he does not respond here let me know and I will give you his email address after I check with him.

    Mike McMunn

    • Mike, Tom and I both ended up in Australia at Sydney in Sept 68. We saw each other the last couple days there. I believe he was from New Jersey when we served at Gosney. Tom Bacon, glad you got back OK.

  92. Everyone…it was great to read through all the comments and things remembered for us all over 46 to 50 years ago. It was a trip back to a time. I was and still am proud to have served my time with Warriors who jobs were to assist those in the field. I was at Gosney Compound Oct 67 through Oct 68. I served with Fred Marshall, Ron Schultz, Scott Farrant, Craig McGee, Rodney Smith,
    Lou Amici, Tom Boyle, SSG Scannel, SFC Anderson, Lt. Small, LT Petrero, CPT Hausch, CPT Clark at the TOC, MAJ Clark G2, and other Great guys I lived with for a year in Viet Nam. Welcome home to all and prayers for those who have passed.
    Tom Bacon. P.S. The get together on Veteran’s Day in D.C. is a great idea.

    • Tom,

      We were in the same hooch along with Lou Amici, Kerry Kurtz, Mike Choinard, Jerry Barrett, Frenchy Boileu (sp?).

      Sam

      • Sam…I must have been drunker then I remembered being so close to the EM Club. Who did you work for! I mostly hung out with the guys at G2. Lost my High School ring in the big field outside Gosney…anyone find it? 🙂

    • Tom – I will finally tell Mike McMunn that I replied on the site. I’m glad that you remembered a few of the names that time had erased from my gray matter. The fact that Mike and I are in the same town and had served in Team 70, a few years apart, was a great suprise. I am glad that this site is here so us old war horses can get in touch with each other. I remember our time in Sidney and still laugh about the ladies there not liking facial hair. Welcome home to all my brothers from the teams especially Team 70. I agree that the get together is a great idea and would be fantastic.

      • Tom…I’m in contact with Scott Farrant all the time, he’s one of the best things to come out of the Viet Nam Conflict. It’s good to hear you’re alive and well. I’m living in Merrillville, IN where are you ( if you care to tell) I remember you being from New Jersey?

        • Tom, I was assigned to the 902nd MI Group upon rotation from Nam. I met and married a lady from PA and have lived there since. We are in a township right outside of Williamsport, the home of the Little League Word Series.

    • Tom, got the pictures from Scotty today that you and Fred put together. Thanks. I was at Lam Son from June ’68 to July ’69. Some of those I served with were Rodney Smith, Fred Marshall, Scott Farrant, Curly Moore, Kerry Kurtz, Harry Krueger, Doug Zimmerman, and Rick Pearson. I would also be interested in a reunion later this year.

    • Hi Tom,
      Craig McGee here, I just found this website tonight. It’s so much fun reading all the comments and remembering all the people we were stationed with.( You did a good job remembering everybody’s names!) Hope your doing well, I’m retired now and living in Naples, Florida. I have had a great ride, have some health issues now but the VA has taken very good care of me.

  93. Larry, I would also like to read the book! Do you know, or anybody know where to find it? Anybody remember SP4 Pete WaacK (not sure of spelling) Or remember new years eve 68/69 when CS grenade thrown through basketball hoop at Lam Son and gassed the Vietnamese officer’s club.. They thought smoke grenade cause they took off my jeep. Viet. officers and wives gagging and throwing up in parking lot…!! Wow Jim C.

    • Jim, I got it on Amazon. A penny for the book and $3.99 for shipping. I checked libraries all around my area, but no one had it. Maybe some other used book sites might have it, but I had a credit at Amazon. They sent it very quickly.

      Larry

      • April 16, 2018

        I just finished reading “the Advisors”, by Curt Rich.
        Unbelievable, what some went through. Luckily I was a REMF, spent most of my time in the TOC and at Harry’s apartment in Saigon.
        I will say, it got my emotions going.
        From anger to hate, and laughter.
        Not that it was funny, it was just so ridiculous, what Jerry Harris had to go through.
        I don’t want to spoil it , if anyone else wants to read it.

  94. Larry,

    I had forgotten the Pizza Hut reference. Alas, there was no Pizza Hut at Lai Khe that I ever knew about. I guess that is artistic license. I did go through Oakland when I returned. I did not get a uniform issue there as I left RVN in khakis. The book was interesting to me since back when it was written there were few books, fiction or non-fiction, written about advisors and it hit home being somewhat based on Team 70 itself.

    Mike

    • Mike, Many parts of it hit home with me also. It had a real authentic atmosphere. It is a novel so I’m sure he used a little creativity. I suspect he created a composite to tell stories he heard about plus his own experience. I left RVN in khakis also. For me a trip to MACV HQ at TSN to have a hamburger and a milk shake in that nice air conditioned building was a mini-vacation. Plus the MP’s couldn’t hassle us. The real Curtis Rich got a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and an Air Medal and apparently left RVN sometime in Sept. 70. Thanks for telling us about the book.

      Larry

    • Thanks for telling me about this group.I just started reading the posts and saw this one. There’s a lot of fiction in The Advisors, but the real Pizza hut run did occur. We went outside the advisors compound gate and got a pizza at a hut, or at least I thing we did. It was a long time ago. Captain West drove. Neither of us were sober.

  95. Yeah Larry, I worked out of G2, but spent almost no time on the MACV compound. To say the least I was not a happy camper!! I was up in Da Nang at a SF compound working as a debriefer for MACV SOG attached to 1st special Forces group on Okinawa (I was not SF, just attached). Compound got over run 26 SF dead (CCN), and then 2 days later I had to go back to Oki to clear to go PCS to Nam. Remember now SA was Col. Leach… He threw that big heavy “Daring Advisors’ (Book) thing he had at me because he didn’t like an interrogation report I sent out ..Hit me in the side and it really hurt (was plywood or something similar) from then on HE didn’t give ME anymore trouble :).Scared us both, Ha, Ha. Spent all my time with the ARVN and picking up prisoners. Was at Nui Ba Den (Black virgin Mountain??) when that big CH46 went down. Probably wrong, but I was told they where way over loaded. Anybody hear anything like that. Anybody hear from, or remember CPT Richard Kelly?

    • Hello Jim, Mike McMunn recommended a book called “The Advisors” by Curt Rich. It’s about Team 70 during this time. On page 85 it says a Chinook was made to hold 33 and they had 50 on board when it crashed at Song Be. I haven’t finished the book yet, but it’s very good so far.

      Larry

      • Larry,

        An interesting coincidence, at least for me, from the book. In the first few pages he recounts being at the auto race in Germany when driver Jimmy Clark was killed. I was there also.

        Mike

        • Hello Mike, I finished “The Advisors”. A good read and certainly moves along quickly. He mentions many things about the general atmosphere there that I certainly remember like the phrase “Don’t mean nothin'”. We certainly used that one a lot. One point that struck me was that he did not seem to go through Oakland Army Terminal. Did officers have a different routine? I went through there every time I went back and forth to RVN (2 round trips). We got our dress green uniforms there, not at Lai Khe. Was there really a Pizza Hut at Lai Khe? I remember the 11th ACR, but I sure don’t remember a Pizza Hut. Thanks for recommending the book.

          Larry

          • l don’t believe there was a Pizza Hut at Lai Khe but I sure do remember “Shakey’s Pizza” signs all over the compound when I was there.

            Larry Stith

    • Hello Jim,

      I read your comments about the Chinook that crashed near Nui Ba Ra mountain.

      My father was Capt. I.F. Padron, US Army Senior Advisor Team 70, 3 Bn. 9 Regt, 5 ARVN Div. He died on a CH-47A Chinook that crashed at Song Be on 6 May, 1969. Song Be is located at the footsteps of Nui Ba Ra.

      On 6 May, 1969 my father and a contingent of US Advisors and ARVN were loaded on to two (2) Ch-47A,s at the MACV resupply pad west of the Song Be airstrip on their way to an airmobile assertion near the Cambodian border.

      My understanding of the events leading up to the crash are based on the Collateral Investigation Report that was done immediately after the accident.

      The report states that while the CH-47A that crashed was at the upper limits of its gross weight capabilities, it was not the cause of the accident. The report concludes that: “A mechanical malfunction resulting in the loss of power on the number 2 engine was the direct cause of this accident.”. The testimony of the survivors is that shortly after take-off engine #2 malfunctioned forcing the CH-47A to loose altitude. The pilot attempted to continue and land in the valley outside the Song Be airstrip. As it flew at low altitude the landing gear hit wires at the edge of the compound. The CH-47A rolled over and crashed on the steep slope at the end of the compound.

      The crash took the life of my father, crewman SP5 Wayne A. Allums and 37 ARVN soldiers.

      My wife and I visited Song Be in 2014. With the help of the maps and crash site photographs provided in the report I was able to locate the crash site. I laid flowers and said a prayer. We spent the night at Song Be. Visiting the last place on earth my father was at gave me some closure and has had a very positive effect on my life.

      I hope this answers your questions concerning the crash.

      Thank you for your service.

      Sincerely,
      Roberto Padron

  96. SA was Jimmy Leach. He later took over the 11th ACR. In WW2, he also served under Creighton Abrams and was wounded the day before Abram’s battalion broke through to Bastogne. Leach appeared in a couple History Channel documentaries on tank battles in WWII. One title I remember is Patton 360. He has a Wikipedia page.

    I was there while you were but don’t remember you. I worked in the Admin Office. One of my jobs was to take classified mail from office to office so I visited G2 twice a day as well as all the other offices. I knew the EM’s who worked in G2 but the only name I think I remember is Jim Arnoldt. There was also a SP4 who was bald so everyone called him Curly.

    I also remember a major later LTC Matthews who was G2 advisor. He later went to a regiment. While standing outside his hooch, he was accidentally shot by the division commander, Thanh I think his name was.

  97. Hello Jim, Welcome on line. Were you in G-2? It appears you were about 9 months ahead of most of us that have been communicating lately. We were mostly there from late ’69 for some, all the way through ’70 like me.

    Larry

  98. I’m reading all these replies and wondering where the hell I was??!. I’m SP6 Jim Chambers, and I relieved Fred Marshall early Sept 68, in Lam Son and was Med evaced(?) out in late April 69, with internal bleeding from some “bug” or something.(Could not stop bleeding from something ??) 2 months at Camp Oji, in Japan, bleeding stopped for no apparent reason, and then on to Korea for 16 more months. Remember Fred, and tall Major named Taylor. (showed up with a big FRO and had to help him with his brass.. Lots of years undercover CI in Detroit), Hell of a guy!! He was asst. G2, and I thought G2 was LTC. “Dan” something. Cpt. Kelly is another I remember….One of the best officers I have ever had the honor to work with! I was older than most there I guess, 26, and. Can’t remember the Senior Advisors name, but he was a LT. under George Patton in WWII. Made all the officers change into dress uniforms for lunch…. The KHAKIS for lunch Bunch they called it..
    Like Fred, worked mostly with ARVN intel. in the corner of the ARVN compound. Stayed in the Army and retired out of Defense language Institute in June 1983.

  99. I guess Allgood had left by then. They gave him a section 8. I went to see him in the hospital. He had 17 yrs in. They really screwed him over. That disaster with the sensors really messed me up. I remember the Cambodia op also. Renee and I hated each other. Why he chose to take me on that sensor op made no sense to me. They required someone with a security clearance so I was it. By that time I was out of G2 and never went back. Anyway. .. VN has been the focus of so much of my adult life, good and bad.

    I’ve gotten reconnected with Larry Stith in the last couple of years and it has been good for me. He is a great guy and friend. Where are you located? Maybe we can get together?

    Take care,
    Lou

    • Hi Lou, I live in the LA area. Like Larry Stith remembered, I was from Oregon in our RVN days, but when I came back to the US, Oregon was too cold and wet for me. I went to school in California and just stayed for good. If any of you are out here let me know and maybe we can get together. It would be a blast.

      Take care,
      Larry

      • How about Wash., DC Veterans Day Nov. 2016 / All that can come
        again, suggestions comments where and how — not many more times we could pull this off collectively
        Robert Bell

        • Bob,

          My wife and I would like to attend the Advisory Team 70 reunion in DC in November. I was part of a four man team assigned from Lai Kae to the 5th ARVN from Feb. 68 to Feb. 69. I have attended a 101st reunion the past two years with a friend who was 101st in Nam. I was telling him that Team 70 held no reunions as far as I knew. My team, from the 1st Infantry Division, consisted of Major McGowan, SSG Statler, PFC Cluen and a SP4 me. I have a hard time remembering after 48 years. Sam Sullivan knew me from the first time I responded to a post after finding this site. It would be great to see guys I served with in 68-69. Maybe my memory will be jogged back to life a little bit. Somebody please keep me informed about ongoing info on the reunion. I’m setting aside Nov. 10-14 for this.

          Thanks,

          Jerry Barrett

  100. was on tm#70 67-68outside phu coung amor unit hello col towle capt egan sgt sellars sgt cook sgtpapov hope you fellows are doi ng well i think of you’ll often but cant remember all names take care barry

  101. Larry go on line to Bangkok travel agent you can book a good flight through them. I did so in 2002, I think 140. is what I spent round trip

    Ed Warneld Team///70 and 90 1964 – 1965

  102. Airfares from LAX to Bangkok have been really cheap lately. I only paid $695 last Dec. I hope the oil prices will stay down for awhile. I haven’t checked on airfares from Bangkok to VN, but there are lots of flights and several airlines so it’s competitive. If anyone goes, let us all know.

    Larry

  103. Larry I have often thought of going back to nam , but allways manage to talk my self out of it .I would like to see it in peace instead of threw the eyes of war. I was there durning the war twice, 2 1/4 yrs with 1st Inf nov 66 to apr 69 and again with 101st airborne jun 71 mar 72 . Because I stayed so long my head isn’t right , saw , did too much. God bless all who served

    • Amen to that. Sounds like you just missed the Battle of An Loc by about a month. I go to Bangkok every once in awhile. i might pop over to VN next time I go. Bob Bell’s trip sounded really interesting.

      Larry

    • Phil, Bob Bell here – I know you saw a lot of BAD stuff. The place is different now and the local VN love Americans. I can tell you, for me
      going back was the most important thing in my life to me.Whatever you decide, be at peace with it, you have a right to be here and
      no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should for you.

      • Hi Bob, Phil, Mike, John, Many of the SE Asia countries like Vietnam and Cambodia have young populations now that have little or no memory of the war time. I recently went to Cambodia and Laos and was greeted with friendliness and a desire to talk. They don’t like their current governments, but life goes on and their life is definitely getting better. From my Vietnamese friends here in So Cal. I hear the same thing when they go back for visits. The corrupt communist government is one thing, but they focus on their local surroundings. I have heard the old Saigon is very busy. The Southerners were always more entreprenurial than the north and once the northern dominance eased off, the economy is booming. I hope to go and see for myself in the next couple of years or so.

        Larry

        • I have not dislike to the Asian people, in fact my son in law is Vietnamese and my grand daughter and I love them both. It would be an extremely large mountain to climb to see Nam again. Not every day , but quite often I have quick thoughts of things pertaining to Nam, like snapshots of some negative things and heaven forbid , I see a war movie on TV, for i get hooked on watching it .I think as a man the most monumental thing for him to do during his life is to be a warrior. My father and uncle were in WW2 and were so proud of there service as well as the rest of America. The negativity we came home to is imbedded in my brain. I do want to see a peaceful Vietnam, but at 68 its a long journey and not so sure it would be worth it , just not sure of its value,.Larry thank you for your input

          • Well said, Phil. Each of us has to decide how they feel about it deep down. It was one of the most significant events in our lives, certainly mine.

            Larry

    • Hi Phil, Team 91 was the Binh Duong Province Advisory Team so that makes sense since Ben Cat is in that province. Did you hear from someone that was on Team 91? I was with Team 91 in Lam Son from Feb 71 to Dec 71. They moved in to Lam Son when Team 70 moved north to Lai Khe. I wonder if the old Gosney Compound buildings are still there.

      • I don’t think anything is left of Gosney Compound. Wikipedia has a page for Phu Loi Base which gives coordinates on Google maps. The runway is still viewable. Using that as a reference, I’ve looked for some remnants of the 5th ARVN base but can’t see anything. I think it is now part of the industrial park. I also find it ironic that about a mile away is an exclusive golf club, Twin Dove Golf Club.

        Regarding Team 70 at Ben Cat, in 68-69 one the 5th ARVN’s regiments was headquartered there so a regimental advisory team and some battalion teams were there, probably about 5 to 10 men.

        • Hello Sam, I think you are probably right about Gosney. We were already right at the edge of town in those days and with development now it’s most likely gone. I went over to some of the homes of the Vietnamese that worked for us and ate in nearby shops so it was already developed. They love golf in SE Asia so a golf course nearby wouldn’t surprise me either. I never did go into Ben Cat with either team I was with at the time. The place still had a reputation.
          The other night TCM had “The Quiet American” on. It was actually filmed in Saigon in 1958. It was interesting to see it with all of the emails we have all been exchanging over the last few weeks. The Continental Hotel in downtown Saigon looked about the same as it did in 1971. I guess it’s been spiffed up now and is more of a luxury hotel, but it has survived. It would be interesting to see Saigon again.

          Larry

      • Of the Gosney compound, in 2001 I, (Bob Bell) went back and took pics but I can’t find them. The Colonels house/hooch, and the mess hall
        were still there. The bldgs, where the Colonel had his office by the TOC are there and being used. The TOC is a 15 foot high mound of
        dirt that the locals told me (in 2001) the NVA blew up in 1975. More of the Gosney compound, it is fenced off and surrounded by a rubber
        plantation. I spent 2 months at Lam Son (how sweet it was), at Lai Khe/Gosney I spent maybe 6 mos and the balance of my 14 mos out in the
        field with the 4th Bn 9th Regt. 5th Div. When I went back I could not find the little outposts where we had 2x105s on a FSB with a Battalion
        of VN on hill368,FSB @ Bo dup, and FSB@ Bo duc on the border with Cambodia where we watched arc light drop their tonnage. The place is unrecognizable from 1969/1970 it is built up so much.The road that goes north from Saigon Hwy1(?) Hwy13(?) I forget but my hired driver got a
        speeding ticket and it is a toll road now. The 2001 trip was, I do not know the words to use how it affected me but it was quite
        provoking to the senses.

        • Bob,

          A couple of clarifications: the advisor compound at Lam Son was known as Gosney Compound, named after MAJ Durwood Dean Gosney, an advisor with the 5th ARVN, who was KIA on 7 Oct 1964. The Lai Khe was known as Couch Compound, named after DSA COL Raymond Couch, killed in a helicopter accident, on 7 Feb 1970 right after wee moved to Lai Khe.

          Mike

      • this is larry eagen tm 70 nov 65 -66 the last 3 months or so i was with tm 91 at phu hoa dong also 2bn 7th reg 5th div was out of phu hoa dong after the big shot out with the 7th reg at thri tam at late nov 66

  104. Thank goodness for the drops. If you got your DEROS to within 150 days of separation, that was it. I eventually got mine also with Tm 91. I got home Dec 24, 1971. It was a good Christmas that year.
    I want to give a shout out to whomever was on Team 70 in April 1972 during the Battle of An Loc. It sounds like our guys were critical in helping the 5th ARVN to stop the NVA attack at that time. It sounds like it was one hell of a battle.

    Larry

    • I am Major(Retired) Mark A. Smith AKA Zippo, I was in the Spring Offensive of 1972 and was captured after the 3 day battle at Loc Ninh with 9th ARVN Regiment. The Division Commander,MG Hung, and the SRA Colonel Bill Miller deployed to An Loc during the An Loc\Loc Ninh battles.

      I am now in Bangkok and have been here since retirement from USA in 1985. I retired from the little position I had assisting the Thais eighteen months ago. Be happy to answer any questions about the Spring Offensive or captivity. I was commissioned by General Westmoreland after serving as a platoon sergeant with the 28th Infantry at Laike from 1966-68.

      For those who don’t know brave MG Hung chose suicide rather than surrender as the 21st Division CG in 1975.

      Zippo

      • This is to Mark Smith – I served with the 9th Regt 4th bn in 1970 Chon Than, Quan Loi, Hill368/ , Bo Duc, & Bo Dup on the border. I dont remember names now but my ARVN counterparts in the 9th were great soldiers. I am sorry to hear about MG Hung. If he had went into capitivity they would have tortured him terribly. I lived in Hawaii 2000 to 2003 and talked to dozens of ARVN troops who had endured 15 – 20 years of brutality and upon release when able, moved to Hawaii. I would love to meet you and talk. Robert Bell

        • Thank you Robert,I posted on here early on but I suspect my time in 71-72 with 5th Division was after most of the fellows. I return to the USA often now for RPW physicals,attend reunions and visit family in CA. I go to DC often because my daughter owns a home across from the Marine Barracks. Be more than happy to sit down with you,where do you reside?

          Mark

          • Mark, thanks for your reply- I live in New Jersey.
            We will stay in touch and keep each other posted. I would be very interested in your capture and
            I have topographical maps from then. At the risk of offending or doing wrong my email is
            ZX1144@AOL.COM

      • Zippo,
        Just found this site and am happy to hear you are alive and well in Bangkok. Ken Wallingford lives in Austin and George W. is in the Northeast ( Mass. or Vt. ) I retired from T.I. in 99 after 22 years making missiles for the Navy and now live in Texas. Hope all is well.
        Tom Howes , Loc Ninh ,’72

        • Tom:
          My husband, Glenn L. Taylor, a retired Army Major, is searching for a fellow VIet Nam veteran named “Tom Howes”.that served with him. Just curious if you are the right one. The individual we are searching for was involved in a rescue when my husband was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Please let me know.
          Regards,
          KTaylor
          kathytaylor2007@aol.com

  105. Feb or Mar 1970- Jan 1971
    I moved to MACV team 70 in Lai Khe, right after the move, as a radio operator.
    We had enough RTOs , so I became Col Hayes personal RTO.
    Good job for me.
    Most of the time, I spent in the The Colonel’s outer office with the Sgt Major, and the COl’s Vietnamese secretary.
    I don’t remember the Sgt Major’s name , or his replacement.
    On ocassion I drove the Col’s jeep around the base, while Col Hayes ran behind me.
    After some RTOs got laid off, I moved into the TOC.
    Most of the time I worked at night.
    The last few months I was permanent CQ in the First Sgt office at night.
    I don’t remember the First Sgt or the CO names, either.

    • It sounds like a bunch of us arrived at about the same time in early 1970. I came in Jan when the G-2 was still at Lam Son. G-2 was Maj. Muenter (sp), Lt. Rennie, Lieb, Clarke, and Andrews. I don’t know if I was being added or replacing someone. After our move to Lai Khe for awhile we worked in the office 1/2 days, dug foxholes and filled sandbags for 1/2 days and pulled guard duty at night. We were all exhausted. Over the summer Clarke, Lieb, and Andy left. I don’t remember any replacements at our rank coming in. Lt. Rennie left and was replaced by Lt. Burke. The Lt. at Tm 91 in Lam Son had tried to recruit me down there and I requested a transfer and was turned down. Maj Muenter left and was replaced by LTC Connell (not sure about the name). Andy had told be before he left that if you extended six months a time you could get another R & R out of it. I still had another year and 1/2 to go and stateside duty was the pits (“painting rocks white” was one phrase). Towards the end of my year I extended for six months and was granted a transfer to Team 91. It was a little more peaceful at the Provincial level. There was a Polish Staff Sergeant with a big long name that came in to G-2 late in my time there, but I don’t remember any other replacements. Maybe the troop draw down had started by then. If any of you can fill in anything else I would appreciate it. After so many years a lot of memories have come flooding back, but some of the details are missing. It’s great hearing again about what we were all doing. At the time we were all so busy.

      Thanks,
      Larry

      • some how I lost the page I was writing on. In finishing, the war was a terrible blight on man/humanity. when I came back I was angry for
        10 years that I had not done more killing. Now, if I kill a spider by reflex I wish I had not. All life is sacred to me. thanks for writing me
        Bob Bell

        • Now I see where you’re coming from Bob.
          I had a similar problem, about even killing an insect.
          What finally happened.
          I was in bed sleeping, when I felt something.
          I jumped out of bed, to see what was there.
          A mother Roach and 6 infants.
          I still respect life, But I know where to draw the line.

              • I got to the team mid-January 1970. I was assigned to G-4, Maintenance Bn and met with LTC Couch. He was a superb officer and I regret that he was killed about 3 weeks later. In the short time I knew him I considered him a mentor.

                He told me that he wanted me to get familiar with the 5th’s AO so he dispatched me to the various regimental bases to learn what was going on. On my first visit to an outpost I was welcomed by the regimental advisory staff and given a place to sleep and shown where the latrine was. It was an enclosed outhouse. The first evening I had to visit the latrine and went out with a flashlight in the middle of the night. I was shocked to shine the light on the interior walls of the outhouse and see 4 – 5 inch roaches covering the walls. To my knowledge I never sleep in a roach nest, than heaven.

      • I also extended 3 months ,2 weeks, and 3 days, to get the early out.I used to know that by heart, but I looked it up this time.
        Things were getting tense at the end , and I don’t know if I could handle it for 9 more months in the states.
        In answer to my own question . I think Sgt Seizmore was the First Sgt.

      • Hey Larry, you forgot MSG Allgood. He was G2 NCO. Lt Renee and he had a big problem with each other. Secret safes were left open on more than 1 occasion and Allgood after 2nd time reported it directly to III Corp. Col Hayes wan not happy about that and the good Sargent was sent packing. Since I was the one who found the safes unlocked and reported it to the Sargent Lt Renee made my life miserable. I wound up going to Lai Khe to set up the compound before the team moved in.

        Take care,
        Lou

        • Hi Lou, Wow, I do not remember Allgood at all. He must have been sent packing right around when I arrived. My orders say I reported to the team Jan 15, 1970. Was there another NCO that came to G-2? I only remember the Polish Sgt. that came late in ’70. You and Lt. Rennie went out on that sensor recon mission in early Feb. i remember that. Do you remember the choppers coming back in to Lam Son late at night when the ARVN’s went in to Cambodia? That didn’t turn out too well. It was quite a time.

          Best Wishes,
          Larry

        • Louis, was this Ron Allgood? If so he took me under his wing years August 1969 – August 1970. The Allgood I knew ETS’d before retirement to get his kids from a very nasty divorce. Also, during this time a team medic , Scottie a good friend.

  106. Larry,

    Speaking of Sgt. Dailey, yes he not only spoke fluent Vietnamese but Russian and Chinese as well. I use to tease him by saying how did a Staff Sgt. learn all those languages unless trained by the NSA. He would never reply. Yes I visited his home also after his child was born and met his wife. He really was a great guy. He had asked me to meet him and his family in California when they returned to the States so his wife would see a familiar face when arriving. I gave him my home address, but never heard from him. I often wondered if he made it back. He was at least 10 years older than me so I don’t know if he’s still around.

    Larry Stith

    • I remember Sgt Dailey also.
      It took a bit.
      I think he was there 5 yrs.
      His first name Ron. it just came back to me today.
      I’m pretty sure, He lived in Ben Cat with his wife.
      He had electric in the village, no one else did.

  107. I also remembered that one VC was placed near the road as I headed to Saigon With My Counterpart. He was starting to smell.

    • Hi All, When the Ruff Puffs would get one over night they would let it lay next to the road for awhile. i remember seeing that also. The part of the highway was always so quiet and a little creepy. Ben Cat is one of the towns the has NOT been renamed since the war ended, unlike Phu Cuong.

      Larry

      • Does anyone remember what happened to Captains Brooks or West? They were my drinking pals. Lots of good memories with those guys.

        • Bill,

          Did I ever send you photos I have of Johnnie West and Carl Brooks?

          If not, I will send.

          Good to hear you are still hanging around. Do you still meet with Dan Tran?

          Mike

          • Mike,
            Any photos would be appreciated. I have been having lunch with Dan Tran every month but lost contact and I have not heard from him. Stay in touch as our counterparts lines are getting thin. I cherish my time serving in team 70 and getting to know you and others I had the pleasure of serving with.

          • Dan Tran and I was having lunch once a month but I lost contact and I have not heard from him since. He has my email and phone but have not heard from him. I lost his info or I would contact him.

  108. Hi Lou, Glad you could join the conversation. It’s been great to renew some old acquaintances. I still remember the sensor recon mission you went out on with Lt. Rennie where an artillery shell booby trap got exploded. I was new in country at the time so I didn’t go. Maybe lucky for me.

    Larry Gale

  109. I was with Team 70, Nov 69 – Nov 70, 96B in G2. Sent to Lai Khe in early 70 to prep compound. It’s nice to see some of the names of old friends on this site. Welcome home Brothers!

    Louis Leib SP4

  110. Hello Phil, When i arrived in Jan ’70 the Headquarters of the 5th ARVN Division was at Lam Son which was located just outside Phu Cuong City on HWY 13. It had been there for quite some time. Nearby was the US helicopter base at Phu Loi. Team 70 was at Lam Son with our own compound called Gosney Compound. All the G departments (G-1, G-2, etc) were located there. In early 1970 the US 1st Div. pulled out of Lai Khe and went home. Lai Khe was an old rubber plantation located about 12 miles up Hwy 13 towards Cambodia. Ben Cat was a couple miles south of Lai Khe. The 5th ARVN HQ then moved to Lai Khe and Team 70 along with them, which is where many of us served in ’70-’71. There may have been advisors from time to time at Ben Cat, but the team and the HQ were not there. Other guys on this site would know better about operations in the field at that time. I hope this helps answer your question.

    Regards,
    Larry

    • Larry I was in Ben Cat from aug 67 to dec 69 and the team that was there was 70 . If you look up Capt Samuel Stewart 3rd on the net you will see he received a silver star and it clearly says tm 70 this was for TET 68 , the worse best day of my life I was also with 1st bn 16th inf out of Lai Khe prior to Ben Cat. Went to nam nov 66 went home april 69 . Was home a year , trouble with the law, back in army for another 3 , this time June 71 to march 72 , with the 101st air I never should have stayed so long , pay for it big time today. Did you know Americans trained ho chi minh and he was our ally durning ww2. I became engrossed in the history of viet nam,, it was about France and rubber. Not communism

      • Hi Phil, I’ve been interested in Viet Nam history also. Why the US backed the French going back in after WW II I don’t understand. And then the French were so stupid at Dien Bien Phu. What a mess. General, later President Thieu was the commanding General of the 5th ARVN. That’s one reason why it was stationed close to Saigon. Originally at Bien Hoa and involved in all the coups, etc. of the early ’60’s. Have you gone back since then? I was looking on a map last night and realized they have changed the names of many of the towns, not just Saigon. What was Phu Cuong is now Thu Dau Mot. I would like to go back for a visit sometime.

        Larry

        • Larry – My name is Bob Bell I worked the TOC in Lam Son and Lai Khe 69 to 71. I went to
          Lai Khe in 2001. All our hoochs and almost everything is gone. The compound is there, it
          is fenced off but the mess hall is there and being used for something. The Colonels French style
          hooch/house is still there. The Toc is a 15 foot high mound of dirt which some of the locals told me
          was blown up by the NVA on thier advancement to Saigon. It was an extraordinary experience.
          Do you know or remember me? I had some pictures from 1970 and 2001 but I can’t find them.
          This web site in—– yes?

          • Hi Bob, Is the old Lai Khe site still out in the middle of no where? From what I see on Google maps it doesn’t look like there is much around the area. Did you have a chance to see if the buildings in Lam Son were still there? Since they were actual concrete construction I would think maybe they were put to some other use. In my working career I audited the engineering firm (PA & E) that actually built Lam Son. What an irony to find that out 3 years later. Everyone at PA & E was very sad in 1975 on that day when Saigon fell. They had done a lot of work in RVN and had friends there.

            Larry

            • Just found this site and found your comment about PA&E interesting. I was with Team 70 in 67-68. I was initially assigned as the SA, 3/9th near Song Be. Got caught in an ambush as we were trying to break an attack on one of the companies and earned my CIB and PH at the same time. Mail Huey picked me up from the bush and took me to Song Be (B-34 SF Camp) where they patched me up and loaded me on an evac bird. Got sent back to CONUS on Emergency Leave -( my wife was at Wright-Patterson AFB Hospital having a kidney removed). Flew back to RVN and ultimately reported to COL Sonstelli (Div SA) who refused to let me return to 3/9th (I was still on crutches). Ended up at the 5th ARVN Tng Center. Bunked a bunch of PA&E guys from Phu Loi on numerous occasions. ARVN guards would stop them on Hwy 13 about dark as they were heading to Saigon and refuse to let them pass. We developed a good relationship and they brought us used conex containers, dug them in and made bunkers out of them for my team as well as the ARVN. Also showed up one day with a 100KW generator on a lowboy. Told us it was found on post! We built a place for it, and provided electricity to the 7th Regt Hq (directly behind us) and an ARVN Cav unit across Hwy 13 and, of course, the Training Center. during Tet 68 all of us got hit pretty bad but the generator continued to run and not a bullet hole anywhere near it!

              • Hi Grant;

                First and foremost, a big “thank you” for the veterans support you do.

                I was a member of Tm 70 from June 67 – June 68; specifically, the ASA for the 3/9th in Phuoc Qua/Loc. Upon my arrival at the compound, I was met by CPT Gerald Wrazen (later KIA in 69 w/101st Abn). He took the M-1 carbine(still wrapped in cozmaline(sp?)
                and gave me an M-16, steel pot, flak jacket and an operational map. He introduced me to my counterpart, and further advised that
                we were headed out for a 10-day op. The counterpart, a CPT took me to a cage nearby which contained a large boa constrictor, and he said that if we had a good operation we would be celebrating with boa steaks after. The boa steaks indeed were very good. We trucked to a debark point, and after standing around in a group for too long of a time, I said we should get a move on or a round or two would get us all. About 20 minutes into a tree plantation, the lead element ran smack into an L-ambush, and of course all hell broke out everywhere. Suffice it to say there were very minor casualtiesl on our side, but there were more on the VC side. The remainder of the operation over the next several days was rather uneventful, but in retrospective, I was glad to get “baptized” early in my tour. CPT Wrazen transferred out and MAJ Jay D. Menger became the new SA
                On October 27th, the compound was hit by the 88th NVA Bde……newly equipped/trained and specifically directed to our compound.
                Following the dust-up and follow-on ops clean up, I was transferred to become SA for 1/9th in Tan Hung/Quan Loi. The SA, MAJ Don Romano moved up to G3 at Lam Son. About two months before my DEROS, 1/9th was relocated to Phu Loi/Lam Son as the ready reaction battalion for the 5th ARVN Div. Just as we got settled in our new location, I was medevaced thru the 93rd and on to Walter Reed Hosp and seven months to get well from amoebic hepatitis. Apparently the source was a feces loaded pungi trap I had stepped in about a month before. During the chaos of moving a battalion I never paid any attention to the 39 pound weight loss, until I could not get out of bed one morning on my own.

                I like your experience with the Conex containers and generator. I had similar experiences in getting critical items for our counterparts and our team. Thank God for friends and contacts in the “logistics alley” of the Big Red One in Quan Loi.

                All the best,

                P. S.

                Do you know whatever happend to Maj Romano?

              • Hello Grant, Great story about the PA&E guys. They were a great group at the HQ here in LA. I was actually there doing an audit the day Saigon fell. A very sad day for all of us. I wonder when the Lam Son compound was built. That area is very different now. A big wide road and industrial parks. I drove by there last December on my ‘memory’ tour.

          • Hello Bob,
            If you ever find your old photos or the ones from 2001 I would like to see them. I think even since 2001 that the Lai Khe area has changed a great deal based on my trip there Dec. 2016. Ben Cat has expanded across and up Hwy 13. You mentioned getting a speeding ticket in 2001. My driver would slow way down at certain spots also. He knew what to look for. Hwy 13 has different hazards now, traffic!

            Larry Gale

      • Phil, you are right.
        If we supported Ho chi minh, instead of backing the French. There would have been no war.
        What if?
        I should know better.

  111. I was at ben cat august 67 to dec 69 with 2/33 rd artillery liason tm 24, I was with macv tm 70 that was there but I’m confused or is it me ? Everyone seems to talk of tm 70 elsewhere not ben cat , can anyone explain this to me sgtv68@aol.com

    • I remember Ben Cat being the village below Lai Khe.
      We had 3 districts, Tay Ninh, Loch Ninh,
      Not sure if Ben Cat was the third

      • Hey Dutton, Ben Cat was right outside Lai Khe, I remember being sent there to get a duce an half tire fixed it was very strange. I also remember you. Hope you are well.
        Lou

          • Hi John, This is for you or John Clarke or Lou in regard to the post from Phil regarding Ben Cat. Did we (Team 70) have anything at Ben Cat while we were there? I always remember it was a town we zoomed by on Hwy 13 when we went from Lai Khe to Saigon. It still had that Iron Triangle stigma attached to it.

            Larry

            • I always remember a big sweeping left curve on Hwy 13 just before you got to the village. There was a wood line about 500 meters directly in front of you as you slowed down and you were always warned about snipers from the wood line.

              I also remember going into Ben Cat village early one morning (I have no idea why I was there) and the VC had entered the village overnight. 3 or 4 VC were KIA and their bodies placed in the village square under the flag pole.

              • I also remember one dead VC was also place by the road as I was headed to Saigon with my counterpart.

                Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device

  112. For those of you who were assigned to Team 70 between mid-1969 to mid-1970 you may be interested in a book I came across about 20 years ago. The title of the book is “The Advisors” and the author is Curt Rich. It is a novel thinly based on Team 70 of which 1LT Rich was a member. If you have a chance to read it you may be able to identify events, team members and maybe even yourself (I’m not in it but I can identify several others). I think you can still locate it on used book sites like Alibris or Abebooks.

  113. Robert, How did you arrange to see Lai Khe again? A private tour or just hire someone for a few days?

    Larry

    • Larry, In 1999 I moved to Hawaii. After I was there about a year I sent my passport to the Vietnamese embassy for a visa, when I got that
      for a 90 day stay I flew to Ho Chi Minh city caught a cab and went any where I wanted. I saved thousands of dollars doing it that way and
      was not hampered by tour guides. For Lai Khe I bartered with a english speaking cab, paid him well and he took care of me.

      • Robert, Thanks for the info on traveling back to VN. I would like to do that myself one of these days. I have a picture of Flagg and the motorcycle if you would like it. It’s great to hear from all of you guys.

        Larry

        • LARRY Thanks for writing I am lucky enough to have the pictures. This website feeds a burning desire in me to make contact with all of team 70 Lam Son Lai Khe and the 4/9 (4th bn, 9th Regiment, 5th ARVN Div) the 4/9 I went into Cambodia with during the invasion. It took me 20 years to find John Dutton and when I did I broke down. I would like to find either John or Mike is first name and last name is Paluch. when I first got out I saw him at his mothers in Chicago and also saw Mike McCort in Chicago. It would be great for us to get together

  114. Hello Robert, I remember your name, but can’t quite picture your face (from 46 years ago). Vietnam to me seems like it was just a little while ago. So many memories. It’s nice to hear from all you guys on this website especially to fill in details I am a little fuzzy about. So you went back to Lai Khe? Wow. I would really like to do that also and to see if anything was left of the Lam Son compound. After I left Team 70 I transferred to Team 91 at Lam Son for another year until Nixon sent me home Dec 71. It was a different time.

    Regards,
    Larry

  115. I served there in all of 1970. If anyone has pics they would like to send please do so at
    zx1144@aol.com . Anyone knowing SFC Sochan, I would like to hear from him. we were at
    FSB hill368 we used to get unfriendlys in the wire and I was young and scared when we were hit
    and he took good care of me and taught me a lot. thanks for reading

  116. Hi John, It seemed like things could go from sleepy and boring to over the top tension in a flash. Thanks for the detail. My burn barrels were full of holes the next morning. Scary. Do you remember the name of the LTC that succeeded Maj. Meunter as the head of G-2? I think it was O’Connell or O’Donnell, something like that.

      • Sorry, but I cannot recall the name. LT Rennie lived in my hootch along with 1LT Tom Ellison (Asst Signal), 1LT Don Estes (Asst Arty), 1LT Don Rennie (Asst G-2), 1LT Seymour Berack, and CPT Mike Rush (Liaison from the 1st Cav).

  117. Hi John, I have some not so fond memories of walking from our living area up to the TOC at night in the pouring rain to get messages. Do you remember the night the VC walked the mortars over the top of the TOC? That was pretty scary counting them as they came in. We were in our bunker next to our living area. It always seemed like they would lob some rockets at us after the 15th of each month. Strange. Lai Khe was really the middle of nowhere.

    Larry

    • yes Larry , it’s very clear to me.
      I was supposed to be at the TOC at 7 pm every night.
      I always got there at 7:10.
      The night it happened , I got there at 7:00, and the mortars walked the path at 7:10.
      I think my mother with the help of God was watching over me.
      I think a guy named Leib, helped medivac a woman who got hit that night.And I think an old man died.

      • 2 young girls were blown up in that attack by company Hq.s I carried one of the girls to a jeep and called a medivac with
        my PRC25 and we took the 2 girls to the airstrip / the girl I carried kept moaning ” mama, mama”. I hear it like it was yesterday. I remember
        a lot of attacks on Lai Khe . my memory is not so good with names anymore but I remember a lot of people
        I would love to see again. I have been very lucky to find one such person in 46 years

      • Your right about the MEDI-VAC, she lived 2 weeks after we got her to Saigon. I wound up going on the chopper because she had an arterial injury and I was the clamp. Sad day. Dr. DeBardenis(sp) went as well and saved an infants life on the way.

        CO thought I went AWOL and as soon as I got back read me my rights under Article 31. I was still covered in her blood. I don’t want to tell you what I told him.

          • I’m Larry Stith (G1 & Security Guard / Couch Compound). I was there with Lou Leib when our Mama a san who cleaned our hooch got hit with shrapnel. I was talking with Larry Gale when we had the incoming. I went and got a medic and returned to find Lou with his fist in her arm socket so she would not bleed out. The medic told Lou not to remove his fist and to get on the medivac with her. It saved her life at least for the a time. I heard what happened when he got back and could not believe they thought he went AWOL. Lou should have got a medal for what he did.

            I was with Adv. Team70 from March 1970-71. I have been looking for Staff Sgt. Ron Dailey who I believe was in G-2 and SP4 Vinnie DePaulo also of Team 70 when I was there. If anyone knows of them or their whereabouts, I would like to know.

            Larry Stith Sgt. E-5

            • Hi Larry, I sure remember that one. The rocket hit so close to where we were sitting. Was Sgt Dailey the guy that spoke fluent Vietnamese? He had a wife in town. I went to his house a couple of times. Great guy. I hope he was able to get his family out before ’75.

              Larry Gale

  118. I worked for MAJ Shouse (sp) in G3. A great guy. At that time I was Asst G-3 Plans and Training. Then went back to G-4. Can’t recall all of the guys in the TOC. They changed so often. Went to Lai Khe about a month after I got to the team at Lam Son in Jan 70.

    Kampe was Hayes replacement. After Kampe it was COL Rhotenberry.

    • This is like a flash back.
      I’m sitting here chuckling.
      Major Shouse was a great guy, alot of respect for him.
      On of my highlights was the day Col Hayes left,
      I was on duty facing the radio, when I heard my name called.
      It was Col Hayes behind me, standing at attention, with his hand extended to shake my hand.
      You might remember me as the guy that got in a little to much trouble.
      I ended up being the night CQ in the first sgt office.

        • I remember COL Hayes’ snake very well. His name was “Boy” and we used to send the ARVN’s to the ARVN farm about once a week to bring back a few ducks. The snake would toy with them for awhile and then gobble them up.

          Mike

          • Hey Mike. Good to see you are still around. I remember one chicken that papa son put in Boy’s cage who took one look at boy and dropped dead. The old man that Col Hayes had taking care of boy was mortified. He was afraid to ask the Col for more money to buy another chicken. I told Col Hayes what happened and he laughed really hard. He told me to give the guy some more money and later went by and told him what a great job he was doing. What ever happened to boy?

        • yeah I remember him.I remember the birds sitting in the cage shaking, waiting for their turn.
          I think one of the workers left the cage opened , letting the Boa out.

  119. John,

    I’m sure I knew you. Was in the TOC every morning and evening for briefings. COL Hayes and COL Kampe were SA’s.

    • I was the radio operator. I remember Col Hayes. Was Col Kempe his replacement?
      I remember Major Shauss(probably spelled wrong)

      Not sure when I arrived, but it was soon after the move to Lai Khe.

  120. john Dutton,

    Was there from 1/70 to 1/71. Where did you work? Glad to have some more Team 70 folks on here.

    Mike McMunn
    G3, G4, Maintenance Bn.

    • I worked in the TOC.
      7 at night to 7 in the morning, 7 days a week.
      It took me 3 years, when I came home to stop saying I just got back from Viet Nam.
      Now I seem to have forgotten a lot.

      • Hi John,
        I remember you. This is Larry Gale. I worked in G-2 from Jan 70 to Dec 70 with Andy Andrews. I think several of us went to Saigon one day. Someone had an apartment there and we all went up to see the view of Saigon. I spent some nights in the TOC also waiting for messages. One night they called in an Arc Light strike in the jungle further north. It was quite a time. Good to hear from you.

          • Hi John, The trips to Saigon were always a pleasant break from the isolation of Lai Khe. It was so empty up there. Do you remember the guy who got hold of a motorcycle there for awhile? I rode it around the empty part of the plantation for a bit one day. At least something different to do. The R & R’s were the best. A chance to see the world on the Army’s dime.

            • He was a medic named Blue. As I told the first Sgt. All of a sudden the motor cycle was by the dispensory, then it turned up by my hutch.
              I took that trip around the perimiter of the camp, a few times myself.

    • Hi All, The Master Sergeant that I had a picture of and asked some of you about was Mstr. Sgt. Waggoner. It came back to me. I sure appreciated his frank opinion about not re-upping, not that I was going to anyway.

      Larry

  121. I was assigned to 2/33rd arty in Lai Khe but attached to the arvn in Ben Cat from august 67 to dec 68. I have always thought that the MACV tm there in Ben Cat was team 70. I was there for the TET battle Was any one in ben cat and remember me , sp4/ sgt vessello sgtv68@aol.com

  122. My dad , Henry R. Garcia , was part of Advisory Team 70 , he was kia in Binh Duong on December 10 , 1967. I would like to hear from anyone that knew my dad.

  123. Hello, everyone. My name is Terry Nau. I am a Vietnam veteran, 2/32 artillery, 1967-68 around Tay Ninh and Cu Chi, currently writing a book about the 21 KIA from my adopted hometown of Pawtucket, RI. One of those 21 is from Fifth Recon, Normand Plante, who died on April 28, 1967. If anyone out there would like to tell me what kind of soldier, and person, Normand was, it would relaly help with his chapter in the book, which is due out in May 2016. I just spoke to Normand’s two sisters yesterday. My email is: tnau3@cox.net … (the book is not for profit, its mission is to honor these soldiers one more time in their hometowns),

    • Mike LaLonde got in touch with me today. Thanks for everything and good luck to all of you in life. — Terry Nau, A Battery, 2/32 artillery, 25th INF DIV, 1067-68

  124. Hello again to Michael LaLonde, Just read a couple of postings from G2/recondo fellas. Do you remember a tall slim Sfc from recon, I remember him to be a bit of a country gentleman, nice fellow. G2 guys listed his name as Anderson, maybe the same? I may have a picture of him. While I am picking your brain, do you remember an Rto named Mike Garcia, kind of a short fellow. At some point he had been wounded, took a round in the jaw,but still came back to duty. For some reason I think Mike was a Recondo. I hope to hear from you and that you are doing well. Chuck LaMons.

    • chuck larry eagen I read some of comments about michael lalonde knowing don gardner and ssgt clemnts .I worked with them in nov 65 thru jun 66 .If any knows how contact please let me know . also chuck are we on jan 2016 thanks larry

      • Hello Larry, I hope you had a merry CHRISTmas with your family and friends. Those fellows you mentioned I do not remember. Did you ever know a SSGT. Al Wiltsie, or SSGT. Bobby L. Jones. Bobby was an arti advisor. Transfered to Amercal Div. about Dec 67. Was KIA at Tet. Good friend of mine, an alabama boy. Wiltsie and I split a dollar bill with our names on it and said if we were to meeet back in the world we would buy a beer with it. Never saw him after Nam. I am waiting for Miachael Lalonde to respond. You will have to excuse me for not remembering what we said about January 2016. Please call me at 828-514-3657. I have lost your number from my phone. Don’t know how. Easy for me I guess. Thank you and take care, Chuck LaMons. my email is chucklamons@gmail.com.

    • chuck I did not know terry Nau but I wouid like to hear from michael Lalonde because I beleave he toke my place with the 2/7/5 div also .I tried to contact people from counterparts no luck. so i have not made plans for reuion in san diego ca thank larry eagen email is larryeagen@att.net

  125. Hello Mike, I just finished writing a lenghty reply and some how lost it. Was really good to read your posting. Thank you for remembering. Your memory is keen. Would be terrific to speak with you, and catch up on our times and lives.My number is 828-514-3657. Call anytime. I had included a lot in the lost post. I apologize for the brevity of this post. I hope you are doing well and life has been good for you. Looking forward to speaking with you. Chuck LaMons/Zollinger.

  126. Good to hear from you Larry. Yes, I do remember the french restaurant in Saigon before we left for R& R. I found that this restaurant was in the Hotel Carville (not sure of spelling) and that this hotel was featured in a major motion picture made in the 1950’s starring Alan Ladd and was aboout trouble in Vietnam and Indochina of all things.

    If you don’t mind I will tell Lou Leib about hearing from you. He might want to reply on this site. He is a traveling man with his wife in an RV but their home base is Vero Beach, Florida on the east Florida coast. My wife and I live in Hudson, Florida on the Florida west coast about a mile from the Gulf of Mexico. Hudson is about 25 miles north of Clearwater, Florida. For your info my email address is lwstith@msn.com . Feel free to email me anytime. its always good to hear from buddies from Vietnam.

    Larry Stith

  127. Hello Larry Stith,
    Sure I remember you. After that rocket attack I remember looking at the shrapnel holes in the First Sgts. uniform hanging in his hooch. Lucky no one was injured. Do you remember counting the mortars landing when they walked them across the TOC? My burn barrels were shredded when I looked the next day. I think you and I had a nice dinner in a French restaurant in Saigon while we were waiting to go on R & R. You were going to Australia and I was going back to Hong Kong.
    I worked with Lou in G-2 while we were still in Lamson. I think he got a Purple Heart when he went out on a recon mission with Lt. Rennie and an ARVN tripped a booby trap. I was new in country at the time. I was quite a time. Great to hear from you.

    Best Wishes,
    Larry Gale

  128. Hello,
    Thanks for taking the time to respond.
    A few others have also reached out to me, including a survivor from the crash.
    It gives me great peace to hear from those who knew my Dad, especially those from his years in Vietnam.
    I went to Song Be a couple of years ago with my wife. With the help of crash scene photos and map I was able to say a prayer and lay flowers on the exact spot his helocopter went down. It has really made a difference in my life.
    My dad sent home many pictures and I was able to locate many of the landmarks at the base. The small runway and the circle where the flag was is now a road with buildings/shops on both sides. The base is now a small town and from the expression of the locals, not to many Americans have been there since. They were all very nice and sympathetic to me.
    Thanks again and thank you for your service. I pray life has been good to you since then.
    Regards,
    Robert

  129. Hello to all Advisory Team 70. I was part of a 4 man 1st Infantry Div. team (Feb 68-Feb 69) from Lai Khe attached to the 5th ARVN at Lam Son. We were with FDC. Maj. McGowen, SSG Statler, PFC Cluen and myself. I have been wanting to locate some of the guys from our Gosney Compound days. I found this web site a few weeks ago and spoke with a couple of men by email or phone. I was wondering if anyone knows Mike Choinard or “Frenchy” Boilieu and knows how to get in touch with them? I believe they were both from MA. Any pictures or info about Team 70 from 68 and 69 will be greatly appreciated. I live the northeast mountains of Georgia. Would love to here from any Team 70 members. There is not one day that goes by that I don’t think of Viet Nam. I was just there last night. Welcome Home! jmbarrett1949@gmail.com

    • Hello, my name is Chuck LaMons. I arrived in country 6/66. I was shipped out LamSon, Gosney compound. I was on security detail for a few weeks when I discovered a former CO of mine from 6thArmy Honor Guard, Presidio, San Francisco, (63-65), had arrived at Team 70. I immediately found him, James W.F. Pruitt Major, he asked me to be his rto. We were assigned to 4/7, 5th Div. Our base camp was Paris Ton Any, a former french outpost triangular, and somewhat small. What a culture shock. We had some many good and some not so good experiences. The Arvnsn needed to be motivated Major Pruitt did a good job of that. Night recon, ambushes, assaults on the VC as the partied in Trung Nhe and other hamlets. Major Pruitt did a good job of getting the Arvns out of the compound, He always went along and took me naturally. I liked working with him and the hand picked Arvns we could trust. I stayed with Team 70 for 20 months, depsrtef 28 Feb ,68.I would like to contact Maj Pruitt, if he is still alive. Hope to hear from you. This is a good site. MACV info hard to find. Chuck

      • Chuck,
        I havn’t been on this site in awhile. What a pleasant surprise to see your postings including the one where you remembered me. Michael La Londe. Of course I remember you. Let’s see if I have this right. You were originally when we first met named “Zollinger”. You went home on leave and came back having taken the name LaMons. Your Stepfather’s name?????
        When you came back from leave there was you LaMons, me LaLonde, and the little guy with glasses was LaRusso all in the same hootch. Now that is a coincidence.
        The African American you mentioned was Caldwell. He was a nice guy but so were you. These postings never disappear so I can’t write some memories but I have several more.
        We’re you there when Martha Raye worked the bunkers the night 1st Division was hit with I think 122 ml rockets. We all scrambled to our bunkers. A couple hit our runway but she ran to all bunkers in her night gown, helmet and flack jacket. Carrying a first aid kit. She was a nurse in WWII and a Lt. colonel in the reserves. She was all Army that night.
        Sorry to go on so long. It was good to hear from you.

  130. Come to think of it three of us went on a mini R&R to Vung Tau not very long before SGM Potrataz left the team for home. We left on the same day. The Vung Tao trip was Col Lawson, SGM Potratz and myself, Bill Covey. The years have deprived me of the names of many people I knew in both Train Compound and after the move to Phu Loi. bill-covey@att.net

    • I think I have a pic of you in my collection. I’ll dig it out when I get some time. I was a PFC and clerked for Col. Lawson at his office at the airbase (HQ 5th ARVN). If I recall Col Wilbur Wilson was at III Corps (I know he accompanied Gen. Westmoreland on his first visit to Train Compound). I took a picture of him at a ceremony at the airbase, and it matches the stuff on-line about “Coal Bin Willie”. Glad you are well. Memories are slowly getting dimmer about those days.

    • Bill, Col. Lawson, I remember him now, he replaced slave-driver Miller. SGM Potratz must’ve replaced my SGM whose name I forget now which is shameful because he was a good man. Shocking how time dims memory of things I should remember better. Well, most of those guys were good Old Army soldiers. I remember Coal Bin Willie, Col. Wilber (I think) Wilson, who was III Corps Sr. Adv. when I was there first time. I knew his SGM Yeager in ’62 when I was in Saigon and when I came back for my second tour in ’65 & Yeager was retired and working for Air America, he told me one day an officer came to see Col Wilson to announce he was going home on emergency leave. His wife was sick or something, and Coal Bin said, “Major, if the army wanted you to have a wife it’d have issued you one.” I presume you know how Coal Bin got that name. He visited us one day at 5th Div. and when he met one of the province Sr. Advisors he relieved him on the spot because he didn’t have a name tag on his uniform. Col. Miller talked him out of it. Col. Wilson was a skinny little guy as I remember him and he looked ridiculous in those old Bermuda shorts w/sand socks that used to be standard issue.

      Dan

      • I remember driving the road, Route 13 or Thunder Road, from Bien How to Ben Cat on a regular basis. AK’s snapped from time to time but I was never hurt. My second tour was in Advisory Team 73 where I served as the Operations Intelligence NCO for Duc Long District down south in the delta. Wouldn’t you know it, Col Wilson was a civilian by then and was the deputy commander of IV Corps. I couldn’t seem to get away from that guy.

  131. Hi John,
    Wow, thanks for filling in the details. A very intense time. I had only heard that an artillery shell booby trap had blown up. I remember watching a Cobra work our perimeter one night when we thought there was a sapper attack. It was a real fireworks show with rockets and mini’s buzzing.
    Hope all is well with you.

    Best Wishes,
    Larry

  132. Help with finding info. out about my Dad. I just discovered this group with help from virtualwall.org where I learned that my Dad was (I believe) a member of ADV TEAM 70, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV. He died July 8, 1965.

    By way of this message, I am hoping I may locate someone that served with him.

    My Dad’s name: Cpt Robert J. Voss and he was originally from Davenport. I was about 6 yrs old when he died. At that time we were at Fort Ord.

    Any information would be appreciated by myself and my family.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jon R. Voss

    • I was with team 70 at that time my name is bill phelps and also john owens good friend was there at that time, let me look at something in my records not sure don’t get hopes up. phelpswilliam99@yahoo.com if you write off this site let know what where talking about thanks bill. p.s. I have to go to my daughters to get internet might be a couple of days

    • Jon I was with the 3RD BN 9th Reg 5TH ARVN DIV.CPT Voss was S/A to the 2BN 9Reg.CPT Voss along with LT Moody,SGT Bruno and SSG Eddie Smith were KIA in a ambush just inside Tay-Ninh Providence. The brother of SGT Bruno lives in Calif he has also visited the ambush site.
      Here is Joes Email jfbruno@att.net I know he would like to hear from you. Ed Warneld ewarneld@hotmail.com

  133. Larry,

    When I got to Lam Son I thought ‘this will not be a bad tour.’ That feeling lasted about 2 weeks. CPT Paul Jackson was killed in an ambush at Bu Noi Junction; LTC Couch was killed in a helicopter accident; and then LT Tom Burke and SSG Montague were killed by a road mine, all within about two weeks. I was assigned to do the line of duty investigations on all of them.

    Lai Khe was the pits but over the year we did manage to ‘dress it up’ a little. Moving in was no fun as you and Larry well know. Here’s a link to a video of the transfer:

    I sure missed the hot showers at Lam Son.

    Stay well. Keep in touch.

    Best regards,

    Mike

    • Hi Mike, Yes, I remember LTC Couch. He interviewed me when I first arrived. It was sad to hear about the accident. Lt. Rennie and some G-2 staff almost got themselves blown up one day while out examining sensors in the field. I always remember the phrase they told us when we first arrived, “Don’t do anything stupid”. Do you know when the team was disbanded? Thanks for the YouTube. Very interesting.

      Best Wishes,
      Larry

      • this i remember. i was called up to go to the helipad to ‘relieve’ some folks in the recon company who were ‘in contact’. that’s all i knew. grabbed my gear, hoofed it to the pad. first helicopter in was stacked with bodies. pilot said a second was on the way for me.

        got on the second, thinking this is going to be shit. the team was in the Iron Triangle (a free fire zone) picking up dead sensors for the museum – first ones they had used, or something like that. when we came in, i looked for the whip anntenna and made a beline for it. someone (won’t say who because i don’t remember) literally knocked me down on his way to the helicopter. at this point, i’m still thinking we are in contact.

        get to the radio and a major (dunno who it was, but he didn’t do much of anything) and found out that the team had tripped a 105 booby trap – what i recall is 12 or 14 dead and wounded.

        we moved out to a relatively large area (though there wasn’t any cover to speak of) and prepared the team in groups for the pickup. while we waited, a pair of cobras started to circle us. knowing it’s a free fire zone i called in requesting that they contact pipesmoke at phu loi and tell them we were friendlies. I know i pissed the sargent off on the TOC end, because i started to yell a bit. see, what he did’nt see was one of them pop smoke on us and the second go up to start a combat run. well, i finally just yanked my hat off, and tried to point out my dayglo orange hair…my guess is that the radio contact was made, as the guy pulled up in mid run and sidled over to us and waved.

        needless to say, looking down the wrong end of a minigun was Not Fun.

        yep, i remember that one.

        /john

        • Hey John,
          I remember it very well as it was me and 1Lt Renee who you and the Major relieved. The chopper that you came in on was right over a 155mm extension fuse and I was trying to get the pilot to move it. That was a very strange day. Renee and I both were wounded that’s why they invited you to the party. It was messy bloodbath for ARVN. Not a good memory. Hope you are well. Send me a email if you get a chance, louleib@gmail.com.
          Take care,
          Lou

    • Mike,

      Just found this website. I was assigned to Advisory Team 70 Gosney Compound, Phu Loi, from Feb. 1968 to Feb. 1969. I was one, of a four man team, from the 1st infantry division located at Lai Kae. My commanding officer was Major McGowan, with Sgt. S. ?(sometimes I can recall his name} and Pfc Cluen. We all were assigned to FDC. I was not trained for FDC. I was at Bien Hoa when my I was called to the CO,s office. There was 1st Infantry captain with the CO. He asked if I wanted to volunteer for a job. I said yes and he brought me to Gosney Compound, 5th ARVN and I received on the job training. I have a hard time with my memory and also I have a hard time sleeping as you can see by the time of this email. I have been up since before two. I was wondering about some of the guys that I served with but can not remember names. One was Mike S. (he was from MA. and had an uncle that ran for VP of the US with Humphries) and another was a guy from Boston, who was crazy about the Boston Bruins(he was black headed, mustache and wore glasses. I never knew what any of the guys MOS’s were, just that we were different teams. I remember the basketball area and the swimming pool and the hot showers. I have a zippo lighter w/5th ARVN on the side. If you have any info it would be great. I could recall the names from a list from this period if I had one. This is the first time I had seen anything on Advisory Team 70. Thank you very much.

      I live in the town of Baldwin, Georgia which is in the N. Georgia mountains about 80 miles north of Atlanta. Ever want to talk: (706)404-4373

      Welcome home,

      Jerry Barrett

      • Jerry,

        I remember you. We were in the same hooch and shared my fan. I think you had the upper bunk and I the lower but I’m not sure.

        Also in the hooch were Kerry Kurtz, Mike Choinard whose uncle was Senator Ed Muskie and the Democratic Party’s nominee for VP, Frenchy Boilieu (sp?) who was the Bruins fan, Tom Bacon and Lou Amici who worked in G@

        Sam Sullivan

  134. Hi Mike, it’s great to hear from someone who went through the same ordeal of the move. Lai Khe seemed like the end of the world when we moved in. I left the team in Dec 70 and moved to Team 91 in Jan 71 so I ended up back at Lam Son for another 11 months with hot showers again. What a wild time. How about you?

    Best Wishes,
    Larry

    • my name is Robert Bell / I also made the move from Lam son to Lai Khe in 1970 . I went back to Lai Khe in 2001
      it is fenced off and the Col.’s house/hooch and the mess hall are all that is left. do you remember me or does anyone
      remember me ? thanks for this site, welcome home everyone. anyone wishing to email me please feel free to do so
      @ zx1144@aol.com I think of my tour over there EVERY day of my life. I was also a RTO with the 4/9 @FSB369,
      and did field operations with the ARVN throughout Binh Long Provence

  135. Hi guys,

    Lucky me I got to the team the 2nd week of Jan. just in time for the move. Rennie lived in my hootch and Burke was a good friend too.

    Mike McMunn

  136. Ken. Good to hear from you. Not too many contacts left from those days. Our trip to Dalat was to a CMA missionary school if I remember. I remember to our old tennis buddy (have a picture of him too). Send me an email address where I can send you the stuff I have directly.

  137. Just found this site. I served between 6-66 & 6-67 I was a radio operator for the 2nd BN 7th Regt 5th ARVN Div. I served With Capt Don Gardner, Lt. Ferkins, SSgt Albert Joseph Clement (a real character if the Army had any). My Name is Michael LaLonde. My e-mail is mlalonde45@gmail.com. Drop an e-mail if u like.
    I answered a request from Edward Pike about Wlilliam Fessler. hope I got that Right.

      • Don Garder i am l larry eagen I was with you nov 65 to I believe june 66 I was sp4 rto we had ssgt wise and ssgt king my e-mail is larryeagen@att.net my ph is 8104343891 hope to hear from you .also heard from chuck Lamons he was 4/7 5th div june 66 thanks guys larry eagen port huron mi

  138. Hi, Just found this site. I was Interrogation Advisor at 5th ID HQ.. from Sept 68 until April 69, when I was then evacuated to Japan with internal bleeding. SFC Mai Cao Vo, was my very good friend, and have often wondered what happened to him. I think I must have replaced Fred Marshall. I remember he spoke excellent Vietnamese, and my language was Chinese Cantonese?? Vo spoke both, plus French, and English!! Col Leach was there as well as Major Taylor when I left. Jim 520-227-2751

  139. Hello Dave,
    Thanks for the reply. It must have been a very horrific scene for you to see.
    I visited the crash site last year. The slope is in deed extremely steep. The aerial photos I have of crash site are deceiving. I had to slide down, hanging on to rubber trees as I went down. The trees were not there during the war.
    It was a very painful but memorable pilgrimage for me.
    Thanks again for sharing your memories with me. They bring my father closer to me.,
    Robert

  140. Started in Team 95 came to Team 70 somewhere between 70-71 left Team 70 to come home Oct 71. Worked Security

    Charles Wilson, MSG Retired

  141. Hi Sam,

    Welcome to the site. Seems like Team 70 has a growing fraternity. Some of those names ring a bell were probably still on the team when I got there in January 1970.

    Mike McMunn

  142. Hello,

    My name is Sam Sullivan and I served with Team 70 from June, 68 to June 69. I was a Sp/4 and worked in the admin office. My duties included delivering classified mail so I visited each office twice a day. That meant I got to meat most team members, including many officers. The senior advisers were Col Leach and Col Fink. I also remember Col Norrie and Matthews, Majors Harrison, Levine, Clark, Capt Stewart, SFCs Drake, McMinn, McElroy, Sgt Schultz and Harry Krueger, Rickey Pearson, Kerry Kurtz, Jim Arnoldt, and many others.

    I’m semi-retired now and living in Houston. I’d love to hear from any team members

    Sam Sullivan

    • Hello Sam.

      I did sleep on the top bunk. When I first got to Gosney Compound a black guy was on the bottom bunk, but I think he went home before I did. I don’t remember if or who might have taken that bunk. The only time I ever went to Lai Kae was to muster out of the 1st Infantry Division so I could go home. Ciuen and one other person(slim and wore glasses) went with me to Lai Kae. We soon encountered a douse and half truck burning. Was told it had hit a mine in the road. We went on anyway. As we went into the front gate, something happened to our truck and had to get maintenance to fix it. Major McGowan was there and was to ride back with us. But, after telling him about the mine, he said he would get a helicopter ride back. On our way back we could not go back down road we came on because of sweeping of mines, The MP’s had us follow a little car on a narrow back road. We stopped and gave an ARVN soldier a ride. Cluen got out to ride in the truck bed. After a while shots rang out, kicking dirt in front of the truck. It was Cluen trying to scare the shit out of me. I got home ok and spent the next 16 months at Ft. Sill.

      I am retired now and every day is like Saturday. I would like to talk with you Sam. I didn’t realize I put the wrong area code on my number earlier. My wife’s number is 706. Mine is (404)403-4373 Or give me your number and I will call you. It was good to hear from someone from my old unit.

      Jerry Barrett

  143. Richard, Good luck in your endeavor to find out what happened to your award. Unless you can locate supporting documents that you were recommended for the award it will be hard to get it. I suggest that you consult with the military records center in St. Louis.

    • Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

      MACV Teams wrote:

      a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com Bill Staton commented: “Richard, Good luck in your endeavor to find out what happened to your award. Unless you can locate supporting documents that you were recommended for the award it will be hard to get it. I suggest that you consult with the military records center in St. L”

  144. Sam,

    I do not know if I knew where Bill was from. I live in Williamsport.

    I have quite a few pictures of the team, Lai Khe and the AO.

    Best regards,

    Mike

  145. I served 69-70. Was advisor to the 53 ARTY Bn. and then to the Div G-5.The only name I recognize posted on this site is Don.Rennie. i often wonder what happened to my counterpart, MAJ Tong., COL (RET)

    Samuel Alitto

    • Sam,

      We probably knew one another when I was on the team in 1970. 1LT Don Rennie (Asst. G-2) was one of my hootchmates. CPT William Gaudette was probably your replacement in G-5. 1LT Don Estes (Asst Arty Advisor) was also one of my hootchmates

      Mike McMunn

      • Yes, Bill was my replacement. He was kinda from my home town. I am from Harrisburg, PA and he was from Hummelstown or Hershey.

  146. I’ll check with counterparts. The reason I inquired here is that Beckleys records show assignment to the 46th Sep Reg. 63-64 and it was operating with the 5th Inf Division during that time. If you are the webmaster, please give me a contact point for me to send you some lists.

    • Stephen,

      I am not the webmaster of either this website or of Counterparts. I do not know exactly who you should contact.

      Mike McMunn

  147. Stephen,

    There are several advisors on there who knew him personally. As you probably know, LTC Beckley died in November 1995. Stu had been a member of Counterparts Assn. and several past and current members knew him or served with him.

    Good luck,

    Mike McMunn
    Advisory Team 70
    70-71

  148. I served with Team 70,9th RCAT in 1971-72 as Senior Battalion Adviser(all units) until I was captured the day after Loc Ninh fell on 7 April 1972 two kilometers south of the camp. Captain George Wanat from the District was captured 31 days after the battle while still trying to E&E to An Loc. LTC Dick Schott died by his own hand beside me in the TOC bunker as the enemy charged in throwing grenades. Major Ed Carlson(now deceased) and Sgt. Ken Wallingford along with French photographer Mick Dumond were captured in the inner perimeter on the morning of the eighth as the communists poured gas into the firing ports of their bunker. Major Davidson escaped from the District compound with Captain Wanat but they became separated and he made it to An Loc. We were held prisoner in the jungle near Krache Cambodia until our release on 12 February 1973 at Loc Ninh. Our brave ARVN soldiers who fell into communist hands were treated far worse than any American POW and I mourn the many who died at the hands of our cruel enemy.

    Thank you for putting this site together.

    Major Mark “Zippo” Smith,USA,Retired

    • Zippo,.
      I tried to check on you years ago and was told you had passed away. We were stationed together in An Loc in ’72 Happy to know you’re alive
      Tom Howes

      • Cpt. Tom Howes ?? I was in Lai Khe dec70-jan72 MACV tm70..Sgt Sizemore, Cpt McCorkle and Lt Robt Mills are a few names I remember without burning too many brain cells rite this moment. I traveled to An Loc a few times with you… Thxs sp4 Bill Himes

  149. My Father was Capt. I. F. Padron. He was with Team 70, 3 Bn, 9th Rgt. 5th ARVN in Phouc Long Province in ’68-’69. He was killed in a CH-47 helicopter crash at the Song Be Airstrip on 5/6/69 along with 1 US aircrew and 32 ARVN.

    • My condolences. I witnessed that crash. I ran down the strip to the edge of the steep hill and it was a pretty awful sight.

    • I was a medic assigned to Team 70. I remember meeting your father a few days before the crash. Their outpost was on top of a very large hill in Song Be.

      • my name is Robert Bell I was with TM70 in 1970. I am looking for a medic named Peter Flagg
        do you know of him.

  150. Make that February1969 to September August 1970. I received a direct Warrant and was transferred to the 1st Cav in Phuoc Vinn.

    • Edward Pike…I was good friends with Bill Fessler Phu Loi Gosney Compound in ’66–’67. Not sure I have this right but is it possible you were Colonel Walker’s typist? You may remember me La Londe Michae

      • Hello Michael, Good to see your name and postings. I just discovered this site this morning. I have been wanting to find a familiar name over the years. Not much on MACV around that I could see. We arrived in country about the same time, 6/66. We shared the same hooch for a while. I saw your posting. That was exciting since I have often thought of you and wondered how you have been. The wife, myself and our children moved to Hickory NC from So Cal 9 years ago. It has been a great blessing in our lives. Was Bill Fessler kind of short and wore glasses? Someplace I have a group picture of most of the guys that lived in the hooch. There was a black fellow, really pleasant man, I think his name is Arnie, who shared the hooch? In case you don’t remember me I was about 6’4 or so and quite skinny. Initially I was on security detail and after a couple of weeks went to the 4/7 at Paris Ton Quy as RTO. My first CO from 6th Army Honor Guard, Major James W.F. Pruitt, who just arrived in country, asked me if I wanted the job. Of course I said yes because guard detail at Phu Loi stunk. He asked me if I wanted go to the field and do some good or set around there on guard duty and perform details nobody else wanted to do. I told him I knew very little about radio. He said he would teach me all I need to know. He was great to work with. I think now I will make the effort to look him up. I have thought about the team members many times over the years. Major Pruitt was a go getter and inspired the Bn to get out of the compound and kick some VC butt. He really inspired those ARVNs. He really enjoyed night operations and liked for me to be his RTO, so I got to go. If you are interested in conversing more call me. 828-514-3657

        Take care, welcome home, and God bless you- Chuck LaMons

    • Ed pike I knew you and William Fessler, I think we were all in the same hooch I would like to touch base Kim Harter team 70 – 67-68

      • My name is Chuck LaMons, Just today found this site, very cool. I know Mike LaLonde. I will be posting him shortly. The name Fessler is very familiar. I think we were in the same hooch as well. My memory is fading of those days events and people. For a period I was a RTO in TOC. was recovering from a VN bacteria that effected my digestive system. Had been RTO on a team with 4/7, 5th Div at Paris Ton Quy, then we moved around. We made Operation Cedar Falls, the Iron Triangle and Nue Ba Din. Team 70- 6/66 to 2/28/68, extended. cell # 828-514-3657

  151. SSG Bill Covey – Dec 63 – Dec 64. We were at Train Compound and moved to Phu Loi. That was many years ago. My second tour was with Advisory Team 73 in Chuong Thien Province. I was the District Operations’Intelligence NCO as a SFC. Here received a direct appointment to Warrant Officer and moved on to the 1st Cav. My advisory duty was over.

    • Served as staff clerk to Col Joel Lawson counterpart to Cmd 5th ARVN. Was quartered at Train compound 1963 1964. Looking for info on Train Compound. Was it location of first US KIA? Have a pic of memorial that has 2 names – Ovnand and Bouis.

      • I am quite sure that LT William Train, son of Gen (Possibly MG Train) was reputed to be the first one killed in Vietnam. I was also at Train Compound before we moved to Phu Loi. At any rate the compound was named for LT Train.

      • MSG Chester Ovnand and Major Dale Buis were killed on 8 July 1959. They are the first two names on the Vietnam Memorial Wall. 1LT William F. Train III was KIA on 16 June 1962 along with CPT Walther McCarthy, Jr.

        1LT Train was the son of MG William F. Train, Jr.

        If you want to read lots more about Ovnand and Buis I recommend _First on the Wall_ by MSG Ray Bows, USA, Retd. and also _Vietnam Military Lore_, also by MSG Bows.

        Mike McMunn
        Adv Tm 70, 70-71

      • Thanks for the book suggestion. Just ordered it. I hav a letter from Gen Westmoreland confirming origin of the name “Train Compound” was for William F Train. His dad was close friend of Gen W. Met Westmoreland at Train while he was still a 3 star. I also have a pic of the Ovnand-Buis memorial in front of building 7 where the attack occurred. It’s now a military museum, according to my research.

      • Seeking info on CPT Stuart Beckley, who served as Bn Advisor to 46th Regiment (Separate), 5th infantry Div 63-64. He built an interesting memorial in Colorado and would like to trace his experiences which led him to do this. My contact info: Sherman1@flash.net

      • Bob, I was with Adv. Tm. 70, Sept. ’62-Sept.’63. At that time the team was in Bien Hoa, BIF Compound, an old French compound that belonged to the Industrial Forestry Bureau (I think, thus “BIF”). Lt Train and LTC (?) Buis were killed shortly before I got there. Later a BOQ in Saigon was named after Buis. The Sr. Adv. to the 5th Div. at the time I arrived was a LTC Kurtz J. Miller. I’ll never forget him. He worked my ass to a frazzle. One morning he saw me in the mess and asked if some reports I was working on were done yet and I replied they were almost ready and I’d finish them after breakfast. He shouted in front of everyone, “Cragg, get your head out of your ass and get back to work! You can eat breakfast tomorrow morning!” Kurtz’s quarters were in an old French villa and when it came to his attention one day that someone had gotten his housemaid pregnant, he called the guy in, a sergeant with the signal detachment. I can still remember the conversation, “Sergeant, Blank, did you or did you not have sex with my housemaid in my bed?” The answer was “Mumble, mumble,” and next day the sergeant was gone. Col. Kurtz’s deputy was a LTC Coleman and the exec. was a Major whose name slips me at the moment. I worked for the Major. Aside from some guys assigned from a signal battalion to provide communications, as an E4 I was the lowest-ranking man in the team. Almost everyone else was either a WWII or Korean War vet. One exception was 1LT Humbert (“Rocky”) Versace, advisor to the 5th Div. Recon Bn. You may remember he was awarded the MoH for the time he was a POW of the VC in the Delta where he went when he was transferred from Adv. Tm. 70. I don’t remember the name of the Div. Commander when I arrived but he was replaced by Col. Nguyen Van Thieu, who later became President of the Republic of Vietnam. The 5th Div., under Thieu, played an important role in the coup against President Ngo Dinh Diem in late 1963. While I was with Team 70 I got to go on operations throughout the division’s DTA, from west up near the Cambodian border to east on the S. China Sea. At that time the DTA was just dangerous enough to be exciting, before the NVA moved in, and night road marches with the ARVN were something to write home about.

        Dan

    • 1sgt Wedsell Gene Roberts. I was in Adv. Tm 70 from. Jan 64 until Feb 65. We were at Train Compound, and moved to Thu Dau Mot . I was with Capt. Gosney the day he was killed. My partner was Capt Fred Mchaffey, who became a 3 star before his death from cancer.

  152. Does any one remember SFC Lewis Twinn? Team 70, KIA 12/31/65. He was my uncle. I served with the 114th Helicopter Company 68 & 69

    • Hi, Jerry – My name is Ron Soden and I knew your uncle. We were not only stationed together in Germany, the same company, but were also in Team 70 at the same time. The date12/31/65 was a terrible day for Team 70 in that we lost your uncle and two others on that day. I have never celebrated New Years Eve since that time. Advisory Team 70 Oct 65 – Oct 66.

      • Louis Twinn was my grandfather. His loss is still felt by our family daily. Any information you want to share about him would be welcomed.

  153. Frank,

    Welcome to this site. It is good.

    I was on Team 70 from early 70 to early 71. I recognize a couple of the names but do not have any contact with them. The camp he mentioned was actually Gosney Compound at Phu Loi. The 5th ARVN and Team 70 moved to Lai Khe in February 70 and our compound was named Couch Compound.

    Good luck with the search.

    Regards,

    Mike McMunn

  154. I was a member of Advisory Team 70 stationed at Lam Som from 67 to 68. I was the sole radio teletype operator with a portable van setup. Just before I deros out ,I was given an advisory 70 zippo lighter , a plaque, and a black and white photo of “Old Soldiers never die , they just fade away”.I still have the plaque and photo. But over the years lost my lighter. If anyone knows how to get the lighter , please let me know. If anyone me to email them a copy of the photo , I would be happy to do so. My email address is cushman.milo@gmail.com

  155. I was with ADV TM 70 from June 69 to July 70. Everything I had from those days (photos, etc) burned in a fire in 1987. I was an Intel Analyst (96B), but went out with the Strikers a lot.

    to answer a previous question about why a signals man (or anyone non-air) would have an air medal – much of our travel was done by helicopter from Pipesmoke, in Phu Loi. if you kept a record/log (which I started but forgot about) you could easily generate enough hours in the air to qualify for an air medal.

    I would love to see photos.

    welcome home to all my team mates.
    /john

    • Hi John,

      Welcome to the Team 70 site. I am sure I knew you at Phu Loi and Lai Khe. Do you remember 1LT Don Rennie? He was assistant G-2 advisor.

      I do have some pictures I would be glad to share. Send me your email address.

      Mine is covan2@verizon.net.

      Best regards,

      Mike

      • Hello Mike,
        I worked for Lt. Rennie when I was assigned to Team 70 in January 1970 at Lam Son. Then I worked for Lt. Burke after Lt. Rennie left. The move to Lai Khe was quite an exercise for all of us.

        Best Wishes,
        Larry

    • Hello Clarke, Do you remember me? We were both 96B’s when Team 70 moved from Lam Son to Lai Khe in 1970. We put in a lot of long days getting that new perimeter ready.

      • Larry,

        I don’t know if you remember me but I was in our hooch the day a rocket blew it half way apart when you and I were talking together. I remember you were from Oregon if I remember correctly and how we enjoyed my large box of goodies for Christmas that actually arrived by boat in February. I am Larry Stith from Indiana and just recently hooked up with another Advisory Team 70 member, Lou Leib who served in Adv. Team 70 in 70-71 also. Hope you are doing well my friend.

        Regards,
        Larry Stith

    • Hi John. This is John Dutton. I just found this sight.
      I was real close to a John Clark in Lai Khe.
      I was there most of 1970.
      We used to go to Harry’s in Saigon.

    • Hi John, I certainly remember you. I also remember an incident in Pho Lou and a M70 round that scared the crap out of us. Lol. I hope you are well. You can contact me at louleib@gmail.com. Take care.
      Lou Leib

      • Lou, my name is Bob Bell. Before I went into the field with the 4th Bn. 9th Regt.
        I worked the Toc at Lai khe from approximately 1/70 to 6/70. Before that sweet
        Lam Son for 2-3 mos. I was and have the good fortune now of being friends with
        John Dutton. Do you remember me? My email is zx1144@aol.com. Welcome home.

  156. Correction… My sister work for G3 at Phu Loi and then transferred to Lai Khe (5th Division ARVN) during 69-70

  157. Hi Mike
    I am writing this note on behalf of my sister, who had worked with team 70 during 68-70.
    She was a secretary for G3 at HQ of 1st Infantry Division under Maj. James M Mossburg.
    Her name is An TRAN and she is currently living in Canada (Toronto area) and would like to make some contact with her ex-colleagues.
    I am living in Dallas, TX and would very much appreciate all your helps
    You can contact me directly at:
    dant@itwsealants.com
    or 972-342-1086
    Kind regards
    Dan Tran

    • Dan Tran, not sure I remember your sister but I also live in the DFW area. Hope we can say hello some day.214 546 0081

    • Hello Dan,

      My father was Capt. Irenaldo F. Padron. He was with MACV Team 70 from 1968-1969. He died at the ARVN base in Song Be City in a helicopter crash along with 28 of his ARVN soldiers.
      I will forward you a picture to your email address. Please feel free to forward this information to your sister. I would like to know if she knew of him.

      PS: I just recently returned from Vietnam. I visited the Song Be area. My dad would not recgnize it. The compound has turned into a very busy town.

      Regards,
      Roberto Padron, AIA
      RPadron99@aol.com

  158. Hello, My name is Ken Strickland, I was a SP5 assigned to Team 70 back in 1963, I worked with then a Capt Bodine in the Psywar/Civic Action program, left in Dec 1963. Were stationed at Train compound, just down the road from 5th Inf Div Headquarters then Commande by Colonel Theui, who later became the first elected president of South Vietnam.

      • Doug, I don’t know how I overlooked your offer all this time. Yes! I would like what ever you can send about AT-70 during that time frame.

        Thank you and I do apologize for such a later response.

        Ken Strickland

    • Ken. I think I have a pic of you on R&R at Dalat. I was at Train Compound 63-64. Clerked for Col Lawson and Col Thieu.

      • I remember you, not many others on the team though. We did attend a holiday in Dalat, I remember when the plane came in to pick us up blew a tire on landing and we got to stay another day or two.

        You and I used to go over to play Tennis with the old
        Vietnamese gentleman at the BIF (bureau of industrial forestery). He looked like he was twice or three times as old as we were and he would beat the socks off us all the time.

        Ken

  159. Welcome home, I served in 1970 as the maintenance advisor to the 5th logistical BN of the 5th ARVN Division at Lai Khe. It was the best assignment that I ever had in my 21 year military career. Have you been to any functions or reunions?

  160. Hi–
    My name is Fred Marshall, and I was with Team 70 from Oct67 to Oct68 as an interrogator, translator, interpreter, and intel analyst with the G2 section under Captain Belitz and Major Richard Clark. SFC Andreas Anderson, SSgt. Bob Scannell, Cpt. Lynn Pochert, 1Lt Robert Petrero, and 2Lt Tim Small were also with G2 at that time along with 6-8 more enlisted men like myself. I spent most of my time with my counterpart Sgt. Mai Cao Vo and other ARVN soldiers at the interrogation building in the far NW corner of the decrepit 5th Division Base. Sgt. Vo and I also spent some time doing interrogations at Loc Ninh and Song Be and at Phu Loi Army Airfield, Bien Hoa and at the National Police HQ in Phu Cuong. Tet ’68 was rather intense. I have about 200 lot of color photos of Gosney Compound, the 5th Division base, the surrounding area, Vung Tau, Bien Hoa, and the great guys I worked with, both US and ARVN. I’m still in contact with a few of my enlisted G2 buddies. You can contact me at kudzu44@comcast.net if interested. My photos (scanned slides) and a number of documents are also at the Texas Tech Viet Nam Center Virtual Archive in the “Willis F. Marshall Collection”. Welcome home!

    • Hi Fred;

      I just found this website and noted a familiar name in your comment; Cpt Lynn Pochert.
      I was a member of Adv Tm 70 from June 67 to Jun 68; initially with the team advising the
      3dBn/9Rgt outside of Song Be. Following the dust-up we had with the 88th NVA Brigade
      in late Oct 67 (one of many engagements leading up to TET), I became the Senior Advisor to the 1st Bn/9Rgt in Tan Hung (outside of Quan Loi). Later into 68, 1/9th was relocated
      outside of Phu Loi/Lam Son as the ready-reation Bn for the 5th ARVN Div. Unfortunately
      for me, in late May I ended up in the 93rd Evac with amoebic dysentery and was medevaced to Walter Reed Hosp for a subsequent 7 month stay to getting rid of amoebic
      hepatitis.
      Over the remainder of my career, Lynn and I were assigned together in Korea (72-73),
      then in NATO (78-81). We stayed in contact over the years via Xmas cards/email and last
      year my wife and I spent four terrific days with Lynn and his wife in Puyallup, WA. Lynn has taken a revisit trip to Vietnam, however, I’ve not been so inclined…..still too many bad memories.

      Thank you for your service and all the best to you,

    • Hi Fred,
      My name is Pat Niemann and I just found this site this evening. Great to have space dedicated to each MACV Team. I was with Team 70 from Oct 66 – Oct 67 and served as the Advisor, G-2 Recondo Company. I remember Major Clark and SFC Anderson. You and I must have just missed each other in Oct 67. My rotation date was extended because my replacement, 1LT Robert Boyd was killed on his first operation when the Recondos hit a hot LZ in the middle of the 572nd NVA Regt. I was in the C&C chopper and I was supposed to leave the next day for Bien Hoa to take the Freedom Bird home. The G3 had the chopper land and picked up Lt. Boyd’s body and dropped me off to be with the Recondos again. It was a hell of a fight. We were reinforced very quickly by the ACR and a 1st Div Bn. I think the 5th Recon Company also assisted.

      Gene Bolin who was the advisor to the 5th Recon Co told me several years ago that Major Clark retired to Florida and passed away.

      I am going to look at your pictures as I had some old slides which are basically faded away.Thanks for that information.

      Someone mentioned that they were having trouble with VA. I received a disability from them for Agent Orange. As many of you Team 70 members know we operated in many areas in Binh Duong and Binh Long Provinces that were sprayed by Agent Orange. it must be documented as I did not have a problem with VA.

      Welcome home!

      • Pat–Thanks for your note, Sorry to hear about Major Clark. He was the finest officer I served with in Viet Nam. SFC Anderson passed away in 2002 in Idaho. I vaguely remember a 1Lt Bolin who advised the Recondos. Their adviser for most of my tour was 1Lt. Anthony Callan, who as I recall was one tough, smart soldier. I spent most of my time at the interrogation building in the far NW corner of the 5th Div. base, next to the Recon. building, I spent more time with the ARVN soldiers than our guys. I also made a number of “field trips” to pick up POWs from US and ARVN operations and bring them back to Lam Son or sometimes to Saigon or Bien Hoa. Loc Ninh, Song Be, An Loc, and the Iron Triangle area are fond memories. Sorry to hear of your service disability. One of my G2 buddies, Rodney Smith of Virginia, died last year after struggling with various ailments he said were caused by agent orange. So many good men killed, maimed, and sickened. Welcome Home!

      • Pat-The report of my passing was exaggerated. I am still on the right side of the grass. I remember you and Bolin doing a little job on the mine field at Train Compound. I was also on that slick that put you in after we recovered Boyd’s body. Also have a French rifle you and Bolin gave to me. Would like to hear from you.

        • Glad to hear you’re still with us, Major Clark (you were a Major when you were Team 70 G2 CO). It was an honor to have served with you. I was the interrogator for G2 as well as a translator, interpreter, and analyst. I have several photos of you including you shaking hands with Gen. Westmoreland and one of you receiving your Gallantry Cross. If you’ll email me at kudzu44@comcast.net, I’ll send them to you. I have a lot of photos of most of the Team at that time, our elegant G2 office, Gosney Compound, the 5th Division Base, and the local area. Hope you’re doing well. I am a retired teacher living in San Jose CA..

        • Hello Major Clark! Craig McGee here. I have been looking for you for 49 years, just found this website yesterday. I have always wanted to thank you for recommending me for the Bronze Star. I received it in a ceremony in September 1968 at Fort Hood Texas. That day that 1st Lieutenant Boyd was killed was the worst day of my life, I still remember you giving me a thumbs up as your helicopter was taking off after I had loaded LT. Boyd’s body onto it. I am now retired and living in Naples, Florida, if you are living in Florida please contact me, would love to see you again and reminisce about our days together at Advisory Team 70.

        • Hi Dick,
          I need to check this site more often. What a great surprise to hear from you! I am glad that Gene Bolin had bad intel about you. After 30 years of active duty I retired in 1993 and settled down in the Tampa Bay area.

          Brendan Battle is living in NC and lost his wife a couple of years ago. We had a nice visit with Nick Page and his wife several years ago and he unfortunately passed away last year. Gene Bolin and I communicate on a regular basis – he lives in WV and has medical problems.

          My email is niemannpat@gmail.com.

          Pat

      • Hello Lt. Niemann,
        I just found this website tonight, Craig McGee here, it has been very interesting reading all the comments. I was the guy on the ground carrying the radio with Lt. Boyd when he was killed, I carried him to the helicopter and you jumped out and walked with me the rest of the day. I still remember Major Clark giving us a thumbs up as the helicopter took off. It was a tough day for us. Hope your doing well, I am retired now and living in Naples, Florida.

        • Hi Craig,
          Great to hear from you. As I told Dick Clark, I need to check this site more often as I did not get notification of your posts.

          I don’t think I had the opportunity to thank you for all of your hard work and professionalism. The fact that you volunteered to go on the Recondo missions was truly commendable and much appreciated by me.

          My email is niemannpat@gmail.com. We live close enough for a get together. I live in Odessa.

          Hope you are well. Welcome home.

          Pat

  161. Hello,
    This is a long shot, but here I go.
    My father was Capt. Irenardo F. Padron, Advisory Team 70 (MACV). He was the senior US advisor with the South Vietnamese 3rd BN, 9th Regiment, 5th ARVN Division.
    He died on 6 May 1969 in a helicopter crash along with one US air crewman and 31 SVN troops on his way to an air assault operation. The crash occurred at take off from the MACV resupply pad near the Song Be airstrip, Phouc long Province.
    I have been able to locate the exact crash site from photographs and maps included in the accident report/investigation we received in 1970.
    The crash occurred in a village called Cu Xa Cong Choc.
    I am going there in March of next year and to lay a remembrance at the site.
    If anyone out there has any information or knew my father I would like to hear from them before I go.
    Regards,
    Roberto Padron

    • Roberto, I resent you the AT-70 list this morning (7 Jan 2014) but your email address bounced back. Doug

  162. Bill,

    Mike McMunn, here. We were both part of the G-4/Maintenance Bn advisory staff. I remember 1LT Tom Ellison was the Sig Bn Advisor and I think CWO Arnold was his assistant and ran the MARS station, too.

    Hope that life has treated you well. I may have a few photos of you and some of the other guys.

    Susanne: I would be glad to help fill in some details also as I was with Team 70 1/70 to 1/71. Thank you for your service with the ARC.

    Regards,

    Mike

    • Mike,  Great to hear from you and life has been good. I still remember some names. Capt Brooks and West come to mind. Did  you keep a roster? I used the MARS station once to call home.

      Bill

      T-Mobile, America’s First Nationwide 4G Network

      • Bill,

        Good to hear from you. Thanks for the reply.

        Some years ago (before CRS) I made a list of as many team members as I could recall. I still have the list of about 30 guys. Have lots of pictures of team members, counterparts, Lai Khe, Lam Son and AO.

        My email is covan2@verizon.net. Remember Carl Brooks and Johnny West, Pete Privas, Major Brown, Major Boone, and lots of others. Send me an email and I will send you my list and I am sure you will remember many.

        Regards,

        Mike

    • Mike, it is such a pleasure to meet you. Please accept my gratitude for your service on this Veterans Day!

      And, would that be CWO Marvin Arnold? If so, that would have been my dad. I would love to hear from you and find out anything you care to share about the job, where it took the team and if you have any photos you’d care to share, that would be wonderful too. Dad said he was based out of Duc Hoa, would that be correct?

      My email is sanne57@gmail.com

      Cheers,
      Susanne

      • Susanne,

        Thank you. This is a great list.

        I regret I have no photos of your father. I do have some photos of our compound at Lam Son and at Lai Khe including a photo of the MARS station (if you do not know what MARS was I can explain).

        He may have been at Duc Hoa was not in our Area of Operations (AO) so it may have been on his other tour. In 1970 we were headquartered at Lam Son and then at Lai Khe.

        My email is covan2@verizon.net

        Regards,

        Mike

  163. Sir, I would appreciate anything that you would care to share with me. Dad never shared much with me until after my first deployment back in 2007. Even then it was always a superficial and benign conversation. Understandably.

    My email is sanne57@gmail.com. Would you be able to talk a bit about your AO, Team 70s mission, and how it could be that Dad, a Signal guy, might have been awarded an Air Medal? I also realize that you all were spread out over a large area so it is even probable that you did not know each other. His name was CW2 Marvin Arnold. I have a photo I could send if you would like.

  164. First of all, please allow me to offer my gratitude and support for your service! I just returned from my 3rd deployment to the current AOR, with the Red Cross, and feel privileged to be able to care for and support our troops today.

    Now, to my question. My dad, CW2 Marvin Arnold, passed away a year ago last March. He was a MACV advisor during both of his tours in Vietnam, 67-68 and 70-71. In my search to gather his papers and awards through the VA, I came across his Record of Assignments, which indicated he was assigned to the 25th Division the first time … and with Team 70 the second tour. I did not know this!

    He has an Air Medal – he was Signal; why would he have an AM? – and he wore a red/white vertical striped ribbon that is not listed on his DD214. Where can I go to learn more about Team 70s operations, locations, missions, etc, during the year he was there (70-71)? Would love to find someone who may have known him then!

    Thanks very much!
    Susanne

    • I can answer your questions about awards and advisory team 70. I served with team 70 in 1970.

      William Staton
      CW3, USA Ret.

      • Larry eagen team 70 nov 65- 66 2bn 7reg 5th div phu hoa dong looking fore capt Gardner first sergents wise and king ,that was our team from nov 65 to about may-66 If anyone can help thank you . I have had melanoma over most of rightside upper cheek in 2012 .VA is giving me a hard time. does any have any info thanks again L Eagen larryeagen@att.net

      • I was supposed to be put in for the bronze star but my Captain was transferred before I got it. Radio operator Advisory team 70 Dec. 65 to Nov66 5th. ARVN. 8th. infantry.

      • William Staton, did you run the MARS station? I worked the TOC in 1970 and knew you better than you knew me. I
        cannot remember their names but you had an E-6 & a Sp4 who worked from the same building that housed the
        MARS station, do you remember their names or where they lived stateside. I was good friends with both of them-
        the sp4 name may have been Rozell. I hope we can both make the reunion in November

        • mr. bell am a disaster on a computer hope this reaches you just found the sight served at tm 70 70,71 as tm medic sfc bob stoltz was my superior remember bill rozell well you bill stoltz and I and others would on occasion cook our own dinners much to the anger of the col. hope you are well sincerely jay doc crumlish

          • John j Crumlish / I am thrilled beyond words to hear from you. where are you? I am in Flemington New Jersey.
            Do you remember Peter Flagg ( nickname Blue ) Happy holidays

            • Bob Bell, I have a picture of Flagg and his famous motorcycle he had at Lai Khe for awhile. I got to ride it once. Great fun riding around the plantation. I am in Bangkok and going to Vietnam on Monday. I am taking your advice and have hired a driver for the day and will just take a ride up Hwy 13 to see what things look like. It’s been 46 years since I left Lai Khe. I’m interested to see how it’s changed. Happy Holidays to everyone on this website who was there in those days long ago.

              Larry Gale

              • LIKE OTHERS HAVE SAID , MY TIME W/ TEAM 70 WAS PROBABLY THE HIGHLIGHT OF MY LIFE
                ( I DO NOT WISH TO GLAMORIZE WAR) ENJOY YOUR TRIP, BE CAREFUL THAT AN EXTRA GUIDE IS NOT PLACED IN YOUR TAXI
                AT THE LAST SECOND. FOR A LARGE FEE TO SHOW YOU THE HIGHLIGHTS. THE VIETNAMESE PEOPLE NOW LOVE US
                AMERICANS. HAPPY TO JUST TAKE A PICTURE WITH YOU. THINGS HAVE REALLY CHANGED. MY TAXI DRIVER GOT A
                SPEEDING TICKET. THANKS FOR THE EMAIL AND HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!—- BOB BELL

        • Hey Bob. This is Vinny DePaola. I was at Lai Khe Sept 70- Feb 71 and you’re right, the Sp4 at the MARS station was named Rozell, Bill Rozell. The E-6 was Bob Hanna. Both great guys. I spoke with them a couple of times right after we got out. But have no idea where they might be today. Hope you are well.

      • Do you remember my Dad, Captain Paul N Jackson? He was with Advisory Team 70 from May, 1969 until he was KIA 1/24/70.

    • I, was the Supply Sergeant (SSG) for Team 70 from December 1963 to December 1964. The Sergeant Major was SGMJ Potratz. At first our Division Senior Advisor was Col Wilson better known then as Coal Bin Willie. I later served as the Operations NCO (SFC) with Team 73 from September 1960 to September 1970. John Paul Vann was the big boss and his deputy was none other than Mr. Wilson also known as Coal Bin Willie.

      Bill Covey, CWO (Retired)

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